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If I have 2 synchronized methods in the same class, but each accessing different variables, can 2 threads access those 2 methods at the same time? Does the lock occur on the object, or does it get as specific as the variables inside the synchronized method?

Example:

class X {

    private int a;
    private int b;

    public synchronized void addA(){
        a++;
    }

    public synchronized void addB(){
        b++;
    }

}

Can 2 threads access the same instance of class X performing x.addA() and x.addB() at the same time?

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up vote 85 down vote accepted

If you declare the method as synchonized (as you're doing by typing public synchronized void addA()) you synchronize on the whole object, so two thread accessing a different variable from this same object would block each other anyway.

If you want to synchronize only on one variable at a time, so two threads won't block each other while accessing different variables, you have synchronize on them separately in synchronized () blocks. If a and b were object references you would use:

public void addA() {
    synchronized( a ) {
        a++;
    }
}
public void addB() {
    synchronized( b ) {
        b++;
    }
}

But since they're primitives you can't do this.

I would suggest you to use AtomicInteger instead:

import java.util.concurrent.atomic.AtomicInteger;
class X {
    AtomicInteger a;
    AtomicInteger b;
    public void addA(){
        a.incrementAndGet();
    }
    public void addB(){ 
        b.incrementAndGet();
    }
}
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67  
If you synchonize on the method you lock the whole object, so two thread accessing a different variable from this same object would block each other anyway. That's a bit misleading. Synchronizing on the method is functionally equivalent to having a synchronized (this) block around the body of the method. The object "this" doesn't become locked, rather the object "this" is used as the mutex and the body is prevented from executing concurrently with other code sections also synchronized on "this." It has no effect on other fields/methods of "this" that aren't synchronized. – Mark Peters Jun 15 '10 at 18:16
4  
Yes, it is truly misleading. For real example - Look at this - stackoverflow.com/questions/14447095/… - Summary : Locking is only at synchronized method level and object's instance variables can be accessed by other thread – mac Sep 1 '13 at 11:10

Syncronized on the method declaration is syntactical sugar for this:

 public void addA() {
     syncronized (this) {
          a++;
     }
  }

On a static method it is syntactical sugar for this:

 ClassA {
     public static void addA() {
          syncronized(ClassA.class) {
              a++;
          }
 }

I think if the Java designers knew then what is understood now about syncronization, they would not have added the syntactical sugar, as it more often than not leads to bad implementations of concurrency.

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1  
Not true. synchronized method generates different bytecode than synchronized(object). While functionality equivalent, it is more than just syntactic sugar. – Steve Kuo Jun 15 '10 at 18:07
3  
I don't think that "syntactical sugar" is strictly defined as byte-code equivalent. The point is it is functionally equivalent. – Yishai Jun 16 '10 at 0:05
1  
If the Java designers had known what was already known about monitors they would have/should have done it differently, instead of basically emulating the innards of Unix. Per Brinch Hansen said 'clearly I have laboured in vain' when he saw the Java concurrency primitives. – EJP Aug 12 '13 at 2:25

The lock accessed is on the object, not on the method. Which variables are accessed within the method is irrelevant.

Adding "synchronized" to the method means the thread running the code must acquire the lock on the object before proceeding. Adding "static synchronized" means the thread running the code must acquire the lock on the class object before proceeding. Alternatively you can wrap code in a block like this:

public void addA() {
    synchronized(this) {
        a++;
    }
}

so that you can specify the object whose lock must be acquired.

If you want to avoid locking on the containing object you can choose between:

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You can do something like the following. In this case you are using the lock on a and b to synchronized instead of the lock on "this". We cannot use int because primitive values don't have locks, so we use Integer.

class x{
   private Integer a;
   private Integer b;
   public void addA(){
      synchronized(a) {
         a++;
      }
   }
   public synchronized void addB(){
      synchronized(b) {
         b++;
      }
   }
}
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This might not work as the boxing and autoboxing from Integer to int and viceversa is dependant on JVM and there is high possibility that two different numbers might get hashed to same address if they are between -128 and 127.

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If you have some methods which are not synchronized and are accessing and changing the instance variables. In your example:

 private int a;
 private int b;

any number of threads can access these non synchronized methods at the same time when other thread is in the synchronized method of the same object and can make changes to instance variables. For e.g :-

 public void changeState() {
      a++;
      b++;
    }

You need to avoid the scenario that non synchronized methods are accessing the instance variables and changing it otherwise there is no point of using synchronized methods.

In the below scenario:-

class X {

        private int a;
        private int b;

        public synchronized void addA(){
            a++;
        }

        public synchronized void addB(){
            b++;
        }
     public void changeState() {
          a++;
          b++;
        }
    }

Only one of the threads can be either in addA or addB method but at the same time any number of threads can enter changeState method. No two threads can enter addA and addB at same time(because of Object level locking) but at same time any number of threads can enter changeState.

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From oracle documentation link

Making methods synchronized has two effects:

First, it is not possible for two invocations of synchronized methods on the same object to interleave. When one thread is executing a synchronized method for an object, all other threads that invoke synchronized methods for the same object block (suspend execution) until the first thread is done with the object.

Second, when a synchronized method exits, it automatically establishes a happens-before relationship with any subsequent invocation of a synchronized method for the same object. This guarantees that changes to the state of the object are visible to all threads

Have a look at this documentation page to understand intrinsic locks and lock behavior.

This will answer your question: On same object x , you can't call x.addA() and x.addB() at same time when one of the synchronized methods execution is in progress.

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