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I have the following classes with an implicit cast operator defined:

class A
{
    ...
}
class B
{
    private A m_a;

    public B(A a)
    {
        this.m_a = a;
    }

    public static implicit operator B(A a)
    {
        return new B(a);
    }
}

Now, I can implicitly cast A to B.

But why can't I implicitly cast A[] to B[] ?

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    // compiles
    A a = new A();
    B b = a;

    // doesn't compile
    A[] arrA = new A[] {new A(), new A()};
    B[] arrB = arrA;
}

Thanks, Malki.

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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

As Mehrdad Afshari mentioned, you're out of luck doing this implicitly. You'll have to get explicit, and it'll involve an array copy. Thankfully, you can probably do it with a one-liner:

arrB = arrA.Cast<B>().ToArray();

Although if you only want to iterate arrB in a foreach statement, you can avoid the copy by omitting ToArray()

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1  
Array.ConvertAll has this covered already msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/exc45z53.aspx –  bottlenecked Jun 16 '10 at 14:01
    
@bottlenecked: excellent point. ConvertAll will do the same thing as my example. It won't, however, allow for iteration against the array as a different type without copying the array, which a simple call to Cast will allow. If a copy is needed, ConvertAll. If iteration is needed, Cast. –  Randolpho Jun 16 '10 at 14:41
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Array covariance only works for reference types and in the inheritance hierarchy (note that it's not a representation-changing conversion: just a set of pointers with identical size interpreted differently.) It will not work for value types and user defined conversions.

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Also, covariance of that sort will only work in .NET 4. –  Randolpho Jun 15 '10 at 18:04
2  
@Randolpho: Not true. Array covariance has been around since .NET 1.0. It's not statically checked safe co/contra-variance for generics that's new in .NET 4. –  LeakyCode Jun 15 '10 at 18:05
    
Heh... Good point. –  Randolpho Jun 15 '10 at 18:07
    
Can't I write an implicit cast method that casts from A[] to B[] ? I don't mind having to loop through the array and casting each object individually into the other array. Can't it be done? (I can't seem to find the syntax for that...) –  Malki Jun 15 '10 at 18:07
    
@Malki: if you don't mind a loop and cast/copy, just use my suggested answer; the methods I mention will do the loop and copy for you. –  Randolpho Jun 15 '10 at 18:12
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Imagine for a moment if Arrays used the same syntax as other collections in .Net, and what you're trying to compare is an Array<A> with an Array<B>. You wouldn't compare a List<A> to a List<B>. Well, that's essentially what you're trying.

I'd recommend using a simple extension method to get the result you want, you'll need to change your syntax slightly to say 'B[] arrB = arrA.ToBArray();`

static class ArrayCast {
    public static B[] ToBArray(this A[] source) {
        var result = new B[source.Length];
        for (int i = 0;i < source.Length;i++)
            result[i] = source[i];
        return result;
    }
}
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ConvertAll

Just to be explicit, here is how you use ConvertAll.

In the case where class B has a member of class A called m_a, do this:

B[] arrB;
A[] arrA = Array.ConvertAll(arrB, b => b.m_a);

.

If class B has some member data that you need to manipulate before you can return an object of type A (such as turning a bunch of numerical values into a string description), do this:

class B
{        
    public static A makeAfromB(B b)
    {
        // Do something with B data...

        A a = new A("data made from B data")
        return a;
    }

    // rest of class B implementation ...
}

// somewhere else in your code...
A[] arrA = Array.ConvertAll(arrB, new Converter<B, A>(B.makeAfromB));

.

You can also use Lambda functions:

A[] arrA = Array.ConvertAll(arrB, new Converter<B, A>(
    delegate(B b)
    {
        // Do something with B data, though object b is const

        A a = new A("data made from B data")
        return a;
    }));

.

It would be nice if ConvertAll could use the implicit operator to do the conversion, but I haven't figured out how to do that.

.

Cast

@Randolpho @bottlenecked

For the cases where you simply want to iterate and would prefer not to make a copy, using cast makes sense. However I have been unable to make it work.

I have an InkPoint class which has a Point object and some other members. I want to call the DrawLines(Pen, Point[]) function. However, I have an array of InkPoint[].

Here is my class and the code I currently have to use, which makes a copy:

public class InkPoint
{
    public InkPoint(int x, int y)
    {
        point = new Point(x, y);
    }

    public Point point { get; set; }

    public static implicit operator Point(InkPoint p)
    {
        return p.point;
    }
}

private void Form1_Paint(object sender, PaintEventArgs e)
{
    InkPoint[] inkPoints = { new InkPoint(1,2), new InkPoint(3,4) };
    Point[] points = Array.ConvertAll(inkPoints, x => x.point);

    Pen pen = new Pen(Color.Black, 1);
    e.Graphics.DrawLines(pen, points);
}

.

I would rather call this, but it won't compile, citing invalid arguments:

e.Graphics.DrawLines(pen, inkPoints.Cast<Point>()); // Compile err: invalid args

.

I've also tried iterating over a cast, but it throws an exception, citing the cast is not valid

foreach (Point p in inkPoints.Cast<Point>()) { } // Exception: cast not valid

.

I don't understand why the specified cast is not valid since I've defined an implicit operator. I'm able to do the following just fine:

InkPoint ip = new InkPoint(10, 20);
Point p1 = ip; // implicit conversion
Point p2 = (Point)ip; // cast

.

For me, the situation is actually slightly more complicated than that. I actually have a list of InkPoints, List<InkPoint>, but the DrawLines function accepts only arrays. So my code looks like this:

List<InkPoint> inkPoints = new List<InkPoint>();
inkPoints.Add(new InkPoint(5, 10));
inkPoints.Add(new InkPoint(10, 15));
Point[] points = inkPoints.ConvertAll<Point>(x => x.point).ToArray();

I can rearrange it slightly to this:

Point[] points = Array.ConvertAll(inkPoints.ToArray(), x => x.point);

.

So I think there's actually two copies happening here. This is annoying since all I want to do is draw the lines. It doesn't seem unreasonable that the DrawLines function should be able to iterate over some array/list that contains references to objects that can be implicitly converted to Point objects.

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