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I found this code in NVIDIA's CUDA SDK samples.

void computeGold( float* reference, float* idata, const unsigned int len)
{
    reference[0] = 0;
    double total_sum = 0;
    unsigned int i;
    for( i = 1; i < len; ++i)
    {
        total_sum += idata[i-1];
        reference[i] = idata[i-1] + reference[i-1];
    }
    // Here it should be okay to use != because we have integer values
    // in a range where float can be exactly represented
    if (total_sum != reference[i-1])
        printf("Warning: exceeding single-precision accuracy.  Scan will be inaccurate.\n");
}
//(C) Nvidia Corp

Can somebody please tell me a case where the warning would be printed, and most importantly, why.

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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The function is written with a certain range of input data in mind. If that input data expectation isn't met, the warning will print:

#include <stdio.h>
#define COUNT_OF(x) (sizeof(x)/sizeof(0[(x)]))

void computeGold( float* reference, float* idata, const unsigned int len)
{
    double total_sum = 0;
    unsigned int i;

    reference[0] = 0;

    for( i = 1; i < len; ++i)
    {
        total_sum += idata[i-1];
        reference[i] = idata[i-1] + reference[i-1];
    }
    // Here it should be okay to use != because we have integer values
    // in a range where float can be exactly represented
    if (total_sum != reference[i-1])
        printf("Warning: exceeding single-precision accuracy.  Scan will be inaccurate.\n");
}
//(C) Nvidia Corp


float data[] = {
    1.0,
    2.0,
    3.0,
    4.0,
    5.0
};

float data2[] = {
    123456.0,
    999999.0,
    999999.0,
    999999.0,
    999999.0,
    999999.0,
    999999.0,
    999999.0,
    999999.0,
    999999.0,
    999999.0,
    999999.0,
    999999.0,
    999999.0,
    999999.0,
    999999.0,
    999999.0,
    999999.0,
    123456.0
};

float ref[COUNT_OF(data2)] = {0.0};

int main()
{
    computeGold( ref, data, COUNT_OF(data));
    computeGold( ref, data2, COUNT_OF(data2));
    return 0;
}
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But my problem is that both the calculations inside compute gold add the exact same numbers in the exact same order, where are things going wrong?. –  user247077 Jun 16 '10 at 12:52
    
@user247077: Are you saying that you're seeing the warning, but not all the time - even for the same set of numbers? –  Michael Burr Jun 16 '10 at 14:13
    
No, what I'm saying is that if the set of numbers is x1, x2,..., xn, then in both the cases, actual addition and reference addition, I'm adding them in the same order. Then why is it that I'm getting an error. I'll be really grateful if you could answer this. Thank you. PS I'm sorry for the late reply. I thought that stackoverflow would notify me of the comments. –  user247077 Jun 21 '10 at 5:56
1  
@user247077: one set of additions is accumulated in total_sum which is of type double. The other addition is accumulated in the reference array members, which are of type float. Type double generally has more precision than type float, so it's able to accumulate results with more significant digits before losing data. As Jerry Coffin mentioned, float will often have only about 6 digits of precision, while double will have about 15 (note those numbers aren't hard and fast, but they're often in the ballpark for 32-bit platforms). –  Michael Burr Jun 21 '10 at 15:16
    
Oh Damn! I completely missed that they had different types. :( –  user247077 Jun 22 '10 at 5:06
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Normally, you cannot sum many floating point numbers.

Eventually the sum becomes different order of magnitude than every new added number, so precision is lost. For example, in case of float, adding a million numbers of the same order of magnitude gives the same result as ten million, because by the time it's done, every new number added doesn't change anything.

There're algorithms around this which involve a couple of multiplications for every added number (indeed, just to sum numbers properly). Yeah, floating point is tricky.

See http://floating-point-gui.de/

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+1 for the link. I was going to link to What Every CS Should Know..., but that is linked there, and a much more difficult read. –  RBerteig Jun 15 '10 at 19:21
    
in fact, I don't like this gui.de, but I just can't seen to find a better one online. –  Pavel Radzivilovsky Jun 15 '10 at 19:39
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A float normally has a range of something like +/- 1e38, but a precision of only about 5 or 6 digits. This means, for example, that something like 12345678 can be stored, but it'll only be stored with ~6 digits of precision, so you'll get the warning.

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