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I have a simple question hopefully - how does one free memory which was allocated in the try block when the exception occurs? Consider the following code:

try
 {
  char *heap = new char [50];
        //let exception occur here
  delete[] heap;
 }
 catch (...)
 {
  cout << "Error, leaving function now";
  //delete[] heap; doesn't work of course, heap is unknown to compiler
  return 1;
 }

How can I free memory after the heap was allocated and exception occurred before calling delete[] heap? Is there a rule not to allocate memory on heap in these try .. catch blocks?

Thanks

share|improve this question
8  
Why use new, when you can use smart pointers and RAII-friendly containers? –  Pavel Radzivilovsky Jun 15 '10 at 19:35
1  
@Pavel - Smart pointers and RAII containers still have issues in complex usage, most notably around cycles causing memory leaks and strange behavior when passing pointers around (which is why auto_ptr isn't used all that much). If you have something that has clear creation and deletion points and you want it to be able to be used in any way in between then there's nothing wrong with raw pointers. –  tloach Jun 15 '10 at 19:39
8  
I disagree categorically. C++ is powerful enough to design clear abstractions into clear classes with exception-friendly behavior buried inside, instead of exposing it to the user. –  Pavel Radzivilovsky Jun 15 '10 at 19:41
7  
@tloach: That is some of the worst advice I have seen for C++. There is practically no need for RAW pointers in code. Any raw pointers should be wrapped and managed by an object. This is because using RAII guarantees the pointers life span (When it is wrapped (eg std::vector never ever leaks)) is correctly controlled even in the presence of exceptions (which is exceptionally hard to do correctly with RAW pointers). –  Loki Astari Jun 15 '10 at 19:52
2  
@tloach: recommending not to use smart pointers because you can do it wrong in some corner case is like recommending not to use a helmet while boxing because you can still be hit in the face. In both cases, you will be less beat up if you decide to use them. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 15 '10 at 20:38

9 Answers 9

up vote 28 down vote accepted

Study the RAII idiom (Resource Acquisition Is Initialization)! See e.g. the Wikipedia article on RAII.

RAII is just the general idea. It is employed e.g. in the C++ standard library's std::auto_ptr template class, or (if I remember correctly) in Boost's boost::shared_ptr template class, which is considered by some to be superior to auto_ptr.


Very brief explanation of the RAII idiom:

Basically, it is the C++ version of try..finally blocks found in some other languages. The RAII idiom is arguably more flexible.

It works like this:

  • You write a wrapper class around your resource (e.g. memory). The destructor is responsible for freeing the resource.

  • You create, as a local (automatic) variable, an instance of your wrapper class in a scope. Once program execution leaves that scope, the object's destructor will be called, thereby releasing the resource (e.g. memory).

The important point is that it doesn't matter how the scope is exited. Even if an exception is thrown, the scope is still exited and the wrapper object's destructor is still called.


Very crude example:

// BEWARE: this is NOT a good implementation at all, but is supposed to
// give you a general idea of how RAII is supposed to work:
template <typename T>
class wrapper_around
{
  public:
    wrapper_around(T value)
        : _value(value)
    { }
    T operator *()
    {
        return _value;
    }
    virtual ~wrapper_around()
    {
        delete _value;  // <-- NOTE: this is incorrect in this particular case;
                        // if T is an array type, delete[] ought to be used
    }
  private:
    T _value;
};
// ...

{
    wrapper_around<char*> heap( new char[50] );
    // ... do something ...

    // no matter how the { } scope in which heap is defined is exited,
    // if heap has a destructor, it will get called when the scope is left.
    // Therefore, delegate the responsibility of managing your allocated
    // memory to the 'wrapper_around' template class.
    // there are already existing implementations, e.g. 'boost::shared_ptr'!
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for pointing to the concept (RAII) first and the implementation (smart pointers, whatever) then. –  Eduardo León Jun 15 '10 at 19:48
    
Thank you for the excellent though. Im pretty new to C++ and for the time being I'd rather use my own implementation instead of blindly using already-made solutions which I have no idea what they do in fact. I'll try to implement it myself firstly and then check what RAII is and how to use it properly. Thank you once again. –  Kra Jun 15 '10 at 19:59
    
Fix your example so it calls delete [] –  Loki Astari Jun 15 '10 at 20:04
    
@Kra: You are welcome. If you implement your own version, you will also need to think about what happens when you copy-construct (or duplicate via = assignment) such a wrapper object. There will be two instances that manage the same resource, but the resource must only be freed once. -- It's not beginner's stuff, but may I suggest a good book on this topic (and others) anyway: Exceptional C++ by Herb Sutter. –  stakx Jun 15 '10 at 20:04
2  
@Kra: I would advise just the opposite. The earlier you get used to the available libraries the better. Note also that if you are not experienced you are prone to make mistakes in the implementation, and it will most probably be hard to debug where the problems are. If you used tested libraries you will be able to focus on your particular code problems. Later, once you get more experienced you can play implementing your own or try to understand the implementations in the libraries and the rationale for each decisions. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 15 '10 at 20:47

OK mister Java programmer:

try
{
    // Exception safe dynamic allocation of a block of memory.
    std::vector<char>  heap(50);

    // DO STUFF

    // Note in C++ we use stack based objects and their constructor/destructor
    // TO give a deterministic cleanup, even in the presence of exceptions.
    //
    // Look up RAII (bad name for a fantastic concept).
}
catch (...)
{
    cout << "Error, leaving function now";
    return 1;  // Though why you want to return when you have not fixed the exception is
               // slightly strange. Did you want to rethrow?
}
share|improve this answer
    
Nope I didn't want to rethrow. I have functions which return 0 when everything is fine (contains also handled exceptions in try block) and when something goes terribly wrong (like unhandled exception) function returns 1. Its up to the caller to handle the situation afterwards. Thanks for the RAII point. –  Kra Jun 15 '10 at 19:56
2  
@Kra: Any reason why you want to translate from exception to return value for error handling? –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 15 '10 at 20:50

Either move the new before the try, so that the pointer is still in scope, or use a smart pointer like shared_ptr or unique_ptr (in a pinch, auto_ptr, but it has issues) that will clean up for you on exit. Exceptions are a huge reason why smart pointers are important.

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2  
In this situation auto_ptr<> is perfect (if smart pointers were the solution). But what about other methods like a dynamic container? –  Loki Astari Jun 15 '10 at 19:48
1  
@Martin York: You can't use auto_ptr with an array, can you? –  Fred Larson Jun 15 '10 at 19:49
1  
Ah yes, that is correct. You aren't supposed to use auto_ptr because it calls delete instead of delete[]. Though some compilers will let you get away with it...not recommended practice though. –  A. Levy Jun 15 '10 at 19:52
1  
boost::scoped_arr or boost::shared_arr would work for this case. –  Fred Larson Jun 15 '10 at 19:54
2  
@John Dibling: auto_ptr would result in undefined behavior in this case since it uses delete instead of delete[], as A. Levy said (and I implied earlier). –  Fred Larson Jun 15 '10 at 19:56

The general answer is use RAII.

However, its possible to solve it by moving the variable out of the try{} scope:

char * heap = NULL;
try {
  heap = new char [50];
  ... stuff ...
} catch (...) {
  if (heap) {
    delete[] heap;
    heap = NULL;
  }
  ... however you want to handle the exception: rethrow, return, etc ...
}

Please note that I'm not recommending this as a good practice - but more of a down & dirty to be used only if you really know the risks and are still willing to take them. Personally, I'd use RAII.

Peace

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2  
RAII: Resource Aquisition Is Initialization. RIAA is a different more evil entity. :) –  Zan Lynx Jun 15 '10 at 22:17
3  
I think maybe you mean RAII. I don't think getting the music industry involved will help exception safety :) –  Peter Jun 15 '10 at 22:20
    
Lolls - thanks guys - obviously when I think of evil, RIAA springs to mind! ;) –  Mordachai Jun 23 '10 at 14:20
1  
if (heap) delete[] heap; is an anti-pattern. It's perfectly safe to use delete[] on a NULL pointer, and does nothing. –  Ben Voigt Feb 24 '12 at 19:17

The 'correct' answer is RAII and shared_ptr as mentioned above, but just to be complete: in your example, you could substitute

char *heap = new char [50];

with

char *stack = static_cast<char*>( alloca(50) );

alloca is almost identical to malloc, except that it alocs memory on the stack instead of the heap, so no matter how you function exits (throwing or now), the memory will be reclaimed, and no deletes or frees are necessary.

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3  
If you're going down that road, just do char heap[50];. The only reason to use alloca is if you don't know the size at compile time, and you're not too bothered about portability. –  Mike Seymour Jun 15 '10 at 23:37

I have to agree with all those that said RAII, however, I'd use Boost's shared_array instead of an auto_ptr. Auto pointer calls delete and not 'delete []' which will cause leaks with an array.

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The easiest way would be to declare the variable before the try block, and then just do the initialization within the block.

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Yes - if you are considering the simplicity - pointer that is outer to your try block is the solution.

Regards

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Agreed with the answers on RAII and smart pointers.

However, if you insist, you can do this:

try { dangerous operations } 
catch { cleanup; throw; }
share|improve this answer
    
How do you clean up something that is not in scope? Why are you re-throwing the exception? –  John Dibling Jun 15 '10 at 19:55
    
(And you forget to clean up in case that all dangerous operations succeed.) –  stakx Jun 15 '10 at 20:01
    
of course, it should be in scope. rethrowing exception is to enable us catch any exception, without killing the error information. The common pattern above is equivalent to 'finally' in SEH and in other programming languages. –  Pavel Radzivilovsky Jun 15 '10 at 20:28
3  
So the OP asked "how does one free memory which was allocated in the try block when the exception occurs?" and you responded basically by saying "by freeing memory which was allocated in the try block when the exception occurs." How useless. –  John Dibling Jun 15 '10 at 22:04

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