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I've written a custom comparator to compare my node classes, but the java priority queue is not returning my items in the correct order.

Here is my comparator:

public int compare(Node n1, Node n2){

    if (n1.getF() > n2.getF()){
        return +1;
    }
    else if (n1.getF() < n2.getF()){
        return -1;
    }
    else {  // equal
        return 0;
    }
}

Where getF returns a double. However after inserting several Nodes into the priority queue, I print them out using:

while(open.size() > 0) {
    Node t = (Node)(open.remove());
    System.out.println(t.getF());
}

Which results in:

6.830951894845301
6.830951894845301
6.0
6.0
5.242640687119285
7.4031242374328485
7.4031242374328485
8.071067811865476

Any ideas why this is so? Is my comparator wrong? Thanks.

Mike

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What actual Java class is your "java priority queue" (I assume PriorityQueue) and how are you constructing it? –  Gray Jun 15 '10 at 19:59
    
java.util.PriorityQueue, I assume? –  Ceilingfish Jun 15 '10 at 20:00
    
Doesn't answer your question, but I did notice that you could simplify your comparator to: return Double.compare(n1.getF(), n2.getF()); –  Richard Fearn Jun 15 '10 at 20:00
    
@Gray - this is how I declare it: Comparator<Node> comparator = new NodeComparator(); PriorityQueue<Node> open = new PriorityQueue<Node>(INITIAL_SIZE, comparator); –  Michael Simpson Jun 15 '10 at 20:29
1  
Bit of an obvious one but, you're not in a multi-threaded environment are you? There's not another thread writing data as you're printing it out? –  Ceilingfish Jun 15 '10 at 20:36

2 Answers 2

How are you printing out those values? I don't think the iterator from PriorityQueue provides the same ordering assurances that the overall class does, so potentially if you're doing

for(Node n : queue) {
System.out.println(n.getF());
}

You'll be getting unordered output. The ordering assurance only applies to offer, take, poll, peek, and possibly some other methods.

There's a special mention on the iterator in the javadocs for priority queue http://java.sun.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/PriorityQueue.html

share|improve this answer
1  
That's correct; from the PriorityQueue javadoc for the iterator() method: "The iterator does not return the elements in any particular order." –  Richard Fearn Jun 15 '10 at 20:02
    
"How are you printing out those values?".... The question says "I print them out using...". –  aioobe Jun 15 '10 at 20:12
1  
I am not using the iterator. Comparator<Node> comparator = new NodeComparator(); PriorityQueue<Node> open = new PriorityQueue<Node>(INITIAL_SIZE, comparator); And then the above while loop. –  Michael Simpson Jun 15 '10 at 20:38

Don't know what's wrong with your code, but this works for me:

import java.util.*;
public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        PriorityQueue<Node> open = new PriorityQueue<Node>(10,
                new Comparator<Node>() {
            @Override
            public int compare(Node n1, Node n2){
                if (n1.getF() > n2.getF()){
                    return +1;
                }
                else if (n1.getF() < n2.getF()){
                    return -1;
                }
                else {  // equal
                    return 0;
                }
            }
        });

        for (int i = 0; i < 20; i++)
            open.add(new Node());

        while(open.size() > 0) {
            Node t = (Node)(open.remove());
            System.out.println(t.getF());
        }
    }
}

class Node {
    double d = Math.random() * 10;
    public double getF() { return d; }
}

Output:

0.21442281608773262
1.9965384843480016
2.6660026888929824
2.888889937975976
3.098932914222398
3.1059072964534638
4.193212975907516
4.296282412431935
4.3241392173963735
4.825876226139123
5.193550353435191
5.637831708672641
5.949759449054407
6.620639629878806
7.505126870725806
7.966337123623846
8.270840212631589
8.484502118941545
8.730910327480023
9.191324325662219

Make sure getF() doesn't accidentally return an int-version of the double.


Update: You cannot update the data which defines the order of the elements after insertion. In that case you need to extract the element, updated it, and reinsert it.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you try using the class iterator? See if you get unordered output? –  Ceilingfish Jun 15 '10 at 20:04
    
Then it's not ordered correctly. Makes sense. If it's implemented as a heap, all it knows is which the next element to remove is. –  aioobe Jun 15 '10 at 20:07
    
Hmm... well I add the nodes to the prio queue first, then use the Node's "setF" function to change the f values after. Is there something about values not being updated in the prio queue after they object has been inserted? Even though I am pointing to the node in the prio queue? @Ceilingfish - my node class initializes the f value to -1 and then inserts into prio queue then updates f val. Which is different than your above example. I appreciate you double checking the basic logic though, thanks. –  Michael Simpson Jun 15 '10 at 20:37
7  
PriorityQueue inserts the data in the correct location. The data is not resorted before it is it is polled. If you are changing the data after insertion it will not be ordered. –  Jacob Tomaw Jun 15 '10 at 20:51
2  
Jacob, you should probably turn this comment into an answer so you can get credit for it (and so that people looking at the question know where to find the answer of course) –  DJClayworth Jun 15 '10 at 21:28

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