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I want to check if a variable has a valid year using a regular expression. Reading the bash manual I understand I could use the operator =~

Looking at the example below, I would expect to see "not OK" but I see "OK". What am I doing wrong?

i="test"
if [ $i=~"200[78]" ]
then
  echo "OK"
else
  echo "not OK"
fi
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possible duplicate of bash regex with quotes? –  outis Apr 1 '12 at 3:24

4 Answers 4

up vote 81 down vote accepted

It was changed between 3.1 and 3.2:

This is a terse description of the new features added to bash-3.2 since the release of bash-3.1.

Quoting the string argument to the [[ command's =~ operator now forces string matching, as with the other pattern-matching operators.

So use it without the quotes thus:

i="test"
if [[ $i =~ 200[78] ]] ; then
    echo "OK"
else
    echo "not OK"
fi
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2  
You need spaces around the operator =~ (thanks Michiel) –  Matthew Hegarty Jul 28 '10 at 13:57
    
How do i handle the situation when the regex contains spaces if I cannot quote? If the regex is e.g. a +b it will report a syntax error... –  Alderath Aug 6 '13 at 13:04
2  
@Alderath: Use a\ \+b to escape the space and the plus character. –  blinry Aug 18 '13 at 9:27

You need spaces around the operator =~

i="test"
if [[ $i =~ "200[78]" ]];
then
  echo "OK"
else
  echo "not OK"
fi
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1  
paxdiablo's answer is right, adding spaces here does not help (you now also get "not OK" for 2008, the only string that gets matched is literally "200[78]"). –  Marcel Stimberg Sep 26 '12 at 17:41

This article uses double square brackets, and a semi-colon before the then. I'm pretty sure the latter is not needed when you have a line break, though. But try changing your brackets.

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Could it be you need quotes around the $i ?

This example does that.

It also mentions Bash v3 - but I guess you are using that...

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