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What are some guidelines for the best use of if versus unless in Perl code? Are there strong reasons to prefer one or the other in some situations?

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If this question wouldn't be years old, I would think about marking it as argumentative. What do others think? :) –  Karel Bílek Aug 22 '13 at 6:03

8 Answers 8

In Perl Best Practices, the advice is to never use unless. Personally, I think that's lunacy.

I use unless whenever there's a simple condition that I would otherwise write as if( ! ... ). I find the unless version to be more readable, especially when used as a postfix:

do_something() unless $should_not_do_that;

I recommend avoiding unless anytime things get more complicated, such as when you will have elsif or else blocks. (Fortunately, or perhaps unfortunately, depending on your perspective, there is no elsunless. :) )

Also, any time a conditional is a complex expression made up of other booleans. For example,

unless( $foo and !$bar )

Is pretty damn confusing, and does not have any advantage over the equivalent if.

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3  
I don't think unless need be automatically avoided for complex expressions. if (!($foo and !$bar)) isn't necessarily clearer and the programmer shouldn't have to (and may not want to) apply DeMorgan's Theorem to get the cleaner if (!$foo or $bar). –  Michael Carman Jun 15 '10 at 21:41
2  
+1 for mentioning Perl Best Practices, and elsunless. –  Matthew J Morrison Jun 16 '10 at 1:57
2  
@Michael The problem with not applying DeMorgan's Theorem is that the next programmer to come along will have to apply it in his head when he reads the code. I ran across this at work recently with a bit of code like unless ($obj->has_errors || !$obj->is_valid) { return 1 } # error handling code follows Or in English "If the prior actions on the object were not not successful don't run the error handling code." –  Ven'Tatsu Jun 16 '10 at 15:24

Aside from one esoteric case1 unless is just syntactic sugar for if !. It exists to allow you to write code that is clearer and more expressive. It should be used when it achieves this goal and shunned when it impairs it.

I find unless to be most useful for flow control in loops. e.g.

while (<$fh>) {
    next unless /\S/;
    # ...
}

For simple negations I find it clearer than a negated if -- it's easy to miss that leading ! when reading code.

unless ($condition) {
    do_something();
}

if (!$condition) {
    do_something();
}

But don't write unless ... else, because that's just jarring.

In postfix form it provides a hint about what the expected path through the code is.

do_normal_thing() unless $some_unlikely_condition;

1) The last expression evaluated is different, which can affect the behavior of subs without an explicit return.

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2  
+1 Great point about implicit returns. –  friedo Jun 15 '10 at 23:29
1  
Sometimes I find the negation reads more clearly if the keyword 'not' is used rather than '!', e.g.: get_ready() if not $ready; –  Grant McLean Jun 16 '10 at 2:07
2  
Absolutely great response. unless exists to improve readability. Remember that and everything else follows. –  daotoad Jun 17 '10 at 5:41
    
Can somebody provide more detail about the footnote ("The last expression evaluated is different, which can affect the behavior of subs without an explicit return")? I can't find any documentation related to it. –  jfritz42 Oct 22 '13 at 20:47
1  
@jfritz42: Implicit return values are documented in perlsub. There's no documentation of the difference between unless (EXPR) and if (!EXPR) with respect to implicit returns; it's just a natural consequence of how they're used. Assuming that EXPR is true (so the conditional's block is not entered) and that there's no else block, the condition is the last evaluated expression and thus its result is the implicit return value. With unless that expression is EXPR (true), whereas with if it's !EXPR (false). –  Michael Carman Oct 23 '13 at 17:47

A rule of thumb is that 'unless' should probably be used infrequently.

It is particularly useful in the postfix form, e.g.:

delete_old_widgets() unless $old_widget_count == 0

Situations where you should never use unless:

  • with a compound condition (and, or, not)
  • with an else clause
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My opinion would be to never use unless. My reasons are:

  • I think the syntax makes code more difficult to read. Having a single method of doing an if makes thing simpler and more consistent.
  • If you need to add an else statement later on you should really change the unless to an if. It's just easier if it is already an if.
  • If the logic inside the unless statement becomes more complex then you can end up with odd code like "unless (x == 5 && y != 7). This is odd because there is a double negative on the second check.
  • There are other ways to negate things, ie x != 5
  • It's more consistent with other languages. I don't know of any other language that has an unless statement and I think there is a very good reason for this.

In perl there are really 4 ways to write an if statement, if, unless and then putting the check at the end of the line instead of the start. I much prefer a single consistent method that is consistent with other langauges also.

Just my $0.02 worth.

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So what you're saying is do_use($feature) unless (!grep($_->name ne "perl" && $_->has_feature($feature), @languages)); Following that to its logical conclusion would have us all writing assembler or FORTRAN. :-) I think even if I'd never seen Perl before I might guess correctly what unless meant. –  Denis Howe Mar 5 at 12:27
    
Hi Denis, I don't really buy the argument that the logical conclusion is that we will end up using assembler. I write perl code as if it was any other language. I don't even write the "or die" any more. I will always write "if(!doSomething()) { die; }. It makes for VERY readable code, something that is lacking in a lot of perl code. If you're a maintenance programmer and you come in after me you get a lot of very clear code that uses no tricks and has lots of clearly defined functions. Did you read code you wrote above, it has a triple negative on name eq perl, or is it ne? It's hard to tell. –  MikeKulls Mar 7 at 3:53

Though I understand the motivations for these sorts of questions I don't believe it's really sensible to boil down the use of something like unless into concrete rules of thumb. This, like a lot of auxiliary syntax in Perl is provided as a minor convenience for programmers to help them articulate themselves clearer at their own discretion; I've seen as much said in more ways than one by the lead developers throughout "Programming Perl". There's no higher purpose or rationalization. I'm well aware this finesses the question, but the only constraint I'd impose on using it is to see that it serves its broader purpose of making the code clearer. If it does, then all is well. Recognizing whether code is understandable is intuitive in itself and can't be reduced to a large handful of overly generalized usage conditions concerning every nuance of the built-in modifiers/operators/overall syntax, and where constraints and guidelines are needed in large group projects I don't think it would make sense to split hairs this finely.

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I spent an hour recently trying to explain to someone how two nested 'unless' clauses worked, it was difficult to decypher without having to invert them into if statements with boolean logic.

If you try to convert it into English, it helps to guide you.

A simple unless works fine. For example.

'Unless you are quiet, I am going to ignore you'.

unless ($quiet) {
    ignore();
}

Although I think this works equally well

'If you are not quiet, I am going to ignore you'

if (not $quiet) {
    ignore();
}

when it starts getting complicated is when you have negation.

'Unless you are not noisy, I am going to ignore you'

unless ( ! $noisy) {
    ignore();
}

Far better written as

'If you are noisy, I am going to ignore you'

if ($noisy) {
    ignore();
}

So, don't use an 'unless' if you also have a negate.

Also don't use 'unless else'

unless ($quiet) {
    ignore();
}
else {
    give_a_sweet();
}

'Unless you are quiet, I will ignore you, otherwise I will give you a sweet'

Change it by inverting the condition.

if ($quiet) {
    give_a_sweet();
}
else {
    ignore();
}

'If you are quiet, I will give you a sweet, otherwise I will ignore you'.

with more than one condition, it get's messy.

unless ($quiet and not $fidgit) {
    punish();
}

'Unless you are quiet and you don't fidgit, I will punish you'.

(sorry my comprehension is failing here!)

again, negate it.

if (not $quiet or $fidgit) {
    punish();
}

'If you are not quiet, or you fidgit, I will punish you'.

the problem with using 'unless' even for the simplest cases, they often (by yourself or by outhe

I hope that makes it clear when you should, or should not, use unless?

(unless you don't have another opinion?)

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Just a personal opinion maybe, but I like to use Unless when the if condition would start with a !

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Alas, many Perl built-in functions and operators seem to exist only to demonstrate how not to design a language. It pains me when I see people earnestly defending a construct that could not have been intended as anything but a joke.

Part of my job requires me to maintain a 34,000 line Perl project. Aside from the near total lack of user input validation and error handling, the use of ten or twenty lines of perl where 1-3 lines of shell would have been clearer (and faster) makes me feel that it was only written in Perl because the manager at hand had heard that Perl was good for corns, callouses, and bunions.

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