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It seems that c# does not support c++ like templates. For example

template <class myType>
myType GetMax (myType a, myType b) {
 return (a>b?a:b);
}

I want my function to have return type based on its parameters, how can i achieve this in c#? How to use templates in C#

EDIT: Can i use object and getType for the almost same purpose?

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I don't see how you'd use GetType to accomplish the same thing, no. And you don't want an API returning object unless you're happy for the caller to have to cast all over the place. –  Jon Skeet Jun 15 '10 at 22:00

6 Answers 6

up vote 22 down vote accepted

The closest to C++ templates in C# is generics - but they're not very close. In particular, you can't use operators like > between generic type values, because the compiler doesn't know about them (and you can't constrain types based on operators). On the other hand, you can write:

public T GetMax<T>(T lhs, T rhs)
{
    return Comparer<T>.Default.Compare(lhs, rhs) > 0 ? lhs : rhs;
}

or

public T GetMax<T>(T lhs, T rhs) where T : IComparable<T>
{
    return lhs.CompareTo(rhs) > 0 ? lhs : rhs;
}

Note that the first of these is null-safe; the second isn't.

A full description of generics is well beyond the scope of a Stack Overflow answer; MSDN has some information, or consult your favourite C# book.

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1  
I've heard C# in depth has some good explanations of generics :) –  SWeko Jun 15 '10 at 21:28
    
The function i given was just a sample, What about functions other than comparison? –  LifeH2O Jun 15 '10 at 21:28
    
@Life2HO: Well, what function do you want? Is it an instance method which is specified in an interface? If so, you're fine. –  Jon Skeet Jun 15 '10 at 21:52

You use Generics in C# to get template like functionality.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms379564(VS.80).aspx

public class MyType<T>
{
}
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Generics!

class MyClass<T> where T : IEnumerable (any parent class here!)
{
   T myGeneric {get; set;}
}
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You'll want to have a look at generics. Syntax:

public T GetMax<T>(T a, T b) {
    return (a>b?a:b);
}

UPDATE because of some comments... I just wanted to provide a very quick overview. Yeah I guess it doesn't compile or execute properly. But this is the basic idea on how this would look like. You'll find more complete replies on this topic - meanwhile.

Execution Syntax:

int a = 5;
int b = 10;
int result = GetMax(a, b);

Hope this helps,

Regards, Thomas

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I was about to say the same but that won't compile because of the line 'return (a>b?a:b);' He will need an interface constraint or something... –  µBio Jun 15 '10 at 21:18
    
You cannot compare a and b in this way, as the compiler has no idea what T is. What if the type T does not support comparison? –  Matt Greer Jun 15 '10 at 21:20

Your code would become something like this:

public T GetMax<T>(T a, T b) where T : IComparable<T>
{
    return a.CompareTo(b) > 0 ? a : b;
}
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Generics in C# are not as powerful as templates in C++. What you want to do does not work in C#.

A hack/workaround for your situation is

public T GetMax<T>(T a, T b) where T: IComparable {
    if(a.CompareTo(b) > 0) {
        return a;
    }
    return b;
}
share|improve this answer
    
The function i given was just a sample, What about functions other than comparison? –  LifeH2O Jun 15 '10 at 21:28
1  
@LifeH2O: It depends - is it specified in an interface? If so, you can constrain the generic type to implement the interface (or derive from a given base class, etc). –  Jon Skeet Jun 15 '10 at 21:29
    
As a C++ developer you may find yourself disappointed with C#'s generics. But they are still useful in many scenarios, and worth learning. –  Matt Greer Jun 15 '10 at 21:33

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