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can anyone tell me if the C# Random.Next() method is thread safe?

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“Any public static (Shared in Visual Basic) members of this type are thread safe. Any instance members are not guaranteed to be thread safe.” (from the docs on System.Random). [OK, to be fair: the single most common problem with pseudo-random numbers that people seem to have is also explained there and they still keep asking] – Joey Jun 16 '10 at 8:43

11 Answers 11

up vote 16 down vote accepted

There's nothing special done in the Next method to achieve thread safety. However, it's an instance method. If you don't share instances of Random across different threads, you don't have much to worry about.

Jon has nice posts on this subject:

StaticRandom
Revisiting randomness

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10  
"If you don't share instances of Random across different threads, you don't have much to worry about." - This is false. Because of the way Random was created, if two separate instances of Random are created on two separate threads at nearly the same time, they will have the same seeds (and thus return the same values). See my answer for a workaround. – BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Dec 26 '12 at 2:33
2  
@BlueRaja I was specifically targeting the state corruption issue within a single instance. Of course, as you mention, the orthogonal problem of statistical relation across two distinct Random instances requires further care. – Mehrdad Afshari Dec 26 '12 at 3:39
4  
I have no idea why this is marked as the answer! Q: "Is Random.Next thread safe?" A: "If you only use it from one thread, then yes it is thread safe".... Worst answer ever! – Mick Apr 23 '15 at 3:55

No, using the same instance from multiple threads can cause it to break and return all 0's. However, creating a thread-safe version (without needing nasty locks on every call to Next()) is simple. Adapted from the idea in this article:

public class ThreadSafeRandom
{
    private static readonly Random _global = new Random();
    [ThreadStatic] private static Random _local;

    public ThreadSafeRandom()
    {
        if (_local == null)
        {
            int seed;
            lock (_global)
            {
                seed = _global.Next();
            }
            _local = new Random(seed);
        }
    }
    public int Next()
    {
        return _local.Next();
    }
}

The idea is to keep a separate static Random variable for each thread. Doing that in the obvious way fails, however, because of another issue with Random - if multiple instances are created at nearly the same time (within about 15ms), they will all return the same values! To fix this, we create a globally-static Random instance to generate the seeds used by each thread.

The above article, by the way, has code demonstrating both of these issues with Random.

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6  
Nice, but don't like the way you need to create a ThreadSafeRandom to use this. Why not use a static property with a lazy getter which contains the construtors code at present. Idea from here: confluence.jetbrains.com/display/ReSharper/… Then the whole class can be static. – weston May 10 '13 at 8:40
1  
@weston: That is usually considered an anti-pattern. Aside from losing all OOP benefits, the primary reason is that static objects cannot be mocked, which is vital for unit-testing any classes that use this. – BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft May 10 '13 at 16:14
1  
Does that then mean you're against all static classes and static public methods? – weston May 10 '13 at 19:13
1  
You can always add a layer of indirection when needed, e.g. add an IRandom, and a class that redirects calls to a static at runtime, this would allow mocking. Just for me, it all the members are static, that implies I should have a static class, it tells the user more, it says that each instance is not separate sequence of random numbers, it is shared. This is the approach I have taken before when I need to mock a static framework class. – weston May 10 '13 at 19:23
1  
@weston: Static classes are basically singletons, but worse in almost every way (singletons are also pretty rarely used nowadays - DI is preferred). The only time you should really ever have a static class is when you have a group of functions that you want logically grouped together, but which share no state (like the Math class) - this is not the case here. This is the general consensus among programmers, not just my opinion. – BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft May 10 '13 at 21:09

No, it's not thread safe. If you need to use the same instance from different threads, you have to synchronise the usage.

I can't really see any reason why you would need that, though. It would be more efficient for each thread to have their own instance of the Random class.

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This can bite you in the ass if you have a unit test object and want to generate tons of test objects at once. The reason for this is that many people make Random a global object for ease of use. I just did that and rand.Next() kept generating 0 as a a value. – JSWork Sep 22 '11 at 21:17
1  
@JSWork: I don't really follow what you mean. What do you refer to when you say "this"? If I understand your last sentence correctly, you accessed the object across threads without synchronising it, which would explain the result. – Guffa Sep 22 '11 at 21:43
1  
You are correct. I apologize - I phrased this poorly. Not doing what you mentioned can bite you in the ass. As cautionary note, readers should be careful when making a new random object for every thread as well - random objects use the current time as their seed. There is a 10ms gap between seed changes. – JSWork Sep 26 '11 at 13:59
2  
@JSWork: Yes, there is a timing issue if the threads are started at the same time. You can use one Random object in the main thread to provide seeds for creating Random objects for the threads to get around that. – Guffa Sep 26 '11 at 14:14
1  
If you are to make a separate random for each thread use something more unique to each thread for a seed, such as thread id or time+thread id or similar. – apokryfos Jan 20 '13 at 12:49

The offical answer from Microsoft is a very strong no:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.random.aspx#8
There is a very nasty side effect that can happen when the same Random object is used by multiple threads: it just stops working

(i.e. there is a race condition which when triggered, the return value from the 'random.Next....' methods will be 0 (for all subsequent calls))

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There is a nastier side effect of using different instances of random object. it returns the same generated number for multiple threads. from same article: Instead of instantiating individual Random objects, we recommend that you create a single Random instance to generate all the random numbers needed by your app. However, Random objects are not thread safe. – AaA Oct 4 '15 at 6:35

Another thread safe way is to use ThreadLocal<T> as follows:

new ThreadLocal<Random>(() => new Random(GenerateSeed()));

The GenerateSeed() method will need to return a unique value each time it is called to assure that the random number sequences are unique in each thread.

static int SeedCount = 0;
static int GenerateSeed() { 
    return (int) ((DateTime.Now.Ticks << 4) + 
                   (Interlocked.Increment(ref SeedCount))); 
}

Will work for small numbers of threads.

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ThreadLocal doesnt necessarily make a method thread-safe. – Winfred Mar 16 '11 at 8:03
    
But in this case, doesn't it make sure that the method doesn't need to be thread-safe.... each thread will access their own copy of the object. – gap Jun 29 '11 at 19:47
4  
++SeedCount introduces a race condition. Use Interlocked.Increment instead. – Edward Brey Dec 25 '12 at 3:17
    
As noted by OP, this will work with a limited number of threads, this would likely be a poor choice inside of ASP.NET – Chris Marisic Sep 17 '14 at 18:13

For what its worth, here is a thread-safe, cryptographically strong RNG that inherits Random.

The implementation includes static entry points for ease of use, they have the same names as the public instance methods but are prefixed with "Get".

A call to the RNGCryptoServiceProvider.GetBytes is a relatively expensive operation. This is mitigated through the use of an internal buffer or "Pool" to make less frequent, and more efficient use of RNGCryptoServiceProvider. If there are few generations in an application domain then this could be viewed as overhead.

using System;
using System.Security.Cryptography;

public class SafeRandom : Random
{
    private const int PoolSize = 2048;

    private static readonly Lazy<RandomNumberGenerator> Rng =
        new Lazy<RandomNumberGenerator>(() => new RNGCryptoServiceProvider());

    private static readonly Lazy<object> PositionLock =
        new Lazy<object>(() => new object());

    private static readonly Lazy<byte[]> Pool =
        new Lazy<byte[]>(() => GeneratePool(new byte[PoolSize]));

    private static int bufferPosition;

    public static int GetNext()
    {
        while (true)
        {
            var result = (int)(GetRandomUInt32() & int.MaxValue);

            if (result != int.MaxValue)
            {
                return result;
            }
        }
    }

    public static int GetNext(int maxValue)
    {
        if (maxValue < 1)
        {
            throw new ArgumentException(
                "Must be greater than zero.",
                "maxValue");
        }
        return GetNext(0, maxValue);
    }

    public static int GetNext(int minValue, int maxValue)
    {
        const long Max = 1 + (long)uint.MaxValue;

        if (minValue >= maxValue)
        {
            throw new ArgumentException(
                "minValue is greater than or equal to maxValue");
        }

        long diff = maxValue - minValue;
        var limit = Max - (Max % diff);

        while (true)
        {
            var rand = GetRandomUInt32();
            if (rand < limit)
            {
                return (int)(minValue + (rand % diff));
            }
        }
    }

    public static void GetNextBytes(byte[] buffer)
    {
        if (buffer == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("buffer");
        }

        if (buffer.Length < PoolSize)
        {
            lock (PositionLock.Value)
            {
                if ((PoolSize - bufferPosition) < buffer.Length)
                {
                    GeneratePool(Pool.Value);
                }

                Buffer.BlockCopy(
                    Pool.Value,
                    bufferPosition,
                    buffer,
                    0,
                    buffer.Length);
                bufferPosition += buffer.Length;
            }
        }
        else
        {
            Rng.Value.GetBytes(buffer);
        }
    }

    public static double GetNextDouble()
    {
        return GetRandomUInt32() / (1.0 + uint.MaxValue);
    }

    public override int Next()
    {
        return GetNext();
    }

    public override int Next(int maxValue)
    {
        return GetNext(0, maxValue);
    }

    public override int Next(int minValue, int maxValue)
    {
        return GetNext(minValue, maxValue);
    }

    public override void NextBytes(byte[] buffer)
    {
        GetNextBytes(buffer);
    }

    public override double NextDouble()
    {
        return GetNextDouble();
    }

    private static byte[] GeneratePool(byte[] buffer)
    {
        bufferPosition = 0;
        Rng.Value.GetBytes(buffer);
        return buffer;
    }

    private static uint GetRandomUInt32()
    {
        uint result;
        lock (PositionLock.Value)
        {
            if ((PoolSize - bufferPosition) < sizeof(uint))
            {
                GeneratePool(Pool.Value)
            }

            result = BitConverter.ToUInt32(
                Pool.Value,
                bufferPosition);
            bufferPosition+= sizeof(uint);
        }

        return result;
    }
}
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2  
Why can GetNext not return 0? Also since maxValue is exclusive,minValue == maxValue should be impossible. – Rawling Jul 9 '14 at 8:43
1  
@Rawling, both seem like valid points to which I'm unable to argue with. I've updated the answer and tested the code to address these issues and assert that they are resolved. – Jodrell Jul 9 '14 at 12:47
    
What is the purpose of PositionLock = new Lazy<object>(() => new object());? Shouldn't this just be SyncRoot = new object();? – Chris Marisic Sep 17 '14 at 18:03
    
@ChrisMarisic, I was following the pattern linked below. However, there is minimal benefit, if any, to the lazy instantiation of the lock so your suggestion seems reasonable. csharpindepth.com/articles/general/singleton.aspx#lazy – Jodrell Sep 18 '14 at 8:08

Per documentation

Any public static (Shared in Visual Basic) members of this type are thread safe. Any instance members are not guaranteed to be thread safe.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.random.aspx

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2  
Documentation that you quoted is actually incorrect. I believe it's a machine-generated content. The Community Content to that topic on MSDN contains a lot of info why the Random type is not thread safe and how to solve this problem (either with cryptography or by using "semaphores") – MTG Aug 14 '11 at 23:34

For thread safe random number generator look at RNGCryptoServiceProvider

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4  
How is a random number generator being cryptographically secure related to thread-safety? – dtb Jun 15 '10 at 22:45
    
And RandomNumberGenerator is much slower as well (and doesn't easily give you integers). – Callum Rogers Jun 15 '10 at 22:58
3  
The documentation you linked to specifically states that the crypto RNG is not thread safe. – Eric Lippert Jun 15 '10 at 23:00
1  
Yeah the RNGCryptoServiceProvider is gold. Much better than Random, though there is a bit more legwork to make it spit out a particular type of number (since it generates random bytes). – Rangoric Jun 16 '10 at 5:05
1  
@Rangoric: No, it's not better than Random for any purpose where either can be used. If you need randomness for encryption purposes the Random class is not an option, for any purpose where you can choose, the Random class is faster and easier to use. – Guffa Jun 16 '10 at 6:06

UPDATED: It is not. You need to either reuse an instance of Random on each consecutive call with locking some "semaphore" object while calling the .Next() method or use a new instance with a guaranteed random seed on each such call. You can get the guaranteed different seed by using cryptography in .NET as Yassir suggested.

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Whilst this may theoretically answer the question, it would be preferable to include the essential parts of the answer here, and provide the link for reference. I also fail to see how this link answers the OP's question about thread safety. – Kev Aug 13 '11 at 12:08
2  
Because I answered much later than others, I posted a link - not the solution. This way someone who might be still interested in this topic can find some additional info. And you need to read the content you've been given BEFORE judging if it actually contains an answer or not. – Kizz Aug 13 '11 at 14:28
    
Big apologies, when I searched the page for "thread" I think I typed "tread". Anyhow, you should still summarise the the content, noting key points so that if the link becomes unavailable this answer still has some use. – Kev Aug 13 '11 at 14:35
    
You have a valid point. I didn't think about the link going bad in time. – Kizz Aug 14 '11 at 23:29

The traditional thread local storage approach can be improved upon by using an lock-less algorithm for the seed. The following was shamelessly stolen from Java's algorithm (possibly even improving on it):

public static class RandomGen2 
{
    private static readonly ThreadLocal<Random> _rng = 
                       new ThreadLocal<Random>(() => new Random(GetUniqueSeed()));

    public static int Next() 
    { 
        return _rng.Value.Next(); 
    } 

    private const long SeedFactor = 1181783497276652981L;
    private static long _seed = 8682522807148012L;

    public static int GetUniqueSeed()
    {
        long next, current;
        do
        {
            current = Interlocked.Read(ref _seed);
            next = current * SeedFactor;
        } while (Interlocked.CompareExchange(ref _seed, next, current) != current);
        return (int)next ^ Environment.TickCount;
   } 
}
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Since Random isn't thread-safe, you should have one per thread, rather than a global instance. If you're worried about these multiple Random classes being seeded at the same time (i.e. by DateTime.Now.Ticks or such), you can use Guids to seed each of them. The .NET Guid generator goes to considerable lengths to ensure non-repeatable results, hence:

var rnd = new Random(BitConverter.ToInt32(Guid.NewGuid().ToByteArray(), 0))
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