Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to write a simple (stand alone) C# extension method to do a Fade-In of a generic WPF UIElement, but the solutions (and code samples) that I found all contain a large number of moving parts (like setting up a story, etc...)

For reference here is an example of the type of API method I would like to create. This code will rotate an UIElement according to the values provided (fromValue, toValue, duration and loop)

public static T rotate<T>(this T uiElement, double fromValue, double toValue, int durationInSeconds, bool loopAnimation)
    where T : UIElement
{
    return (T)uiElement.wpfInvoke(
            ()=>{
                    DoubleAnimation doubleAnimation = new DoubleAnimation(fromValue, toValue, new Duration(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(durationInSeconds)));
                    RotateTransform rotateTransform = new RotateTransform(); 
                    uiElement.RenderTransform = rotateTransform;
                    uiElement.RenderTransformOrigin = new System.Windows.Point(0.5, 0.5);  
                    if (loopAnimation)
                        doubleAnimation.RepeatBehavior = RepeatBehavior.Forever;
                    rotateTransform.BeginAnimation(RotateTransform.AngleProperty, doubleAnimation);
                    return uiElement;
                });
}
share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Sounds like you're looking for something like this:

public static T FadeIn<T>(this T uiElement, int durationInSeconds)
{
  return uiElement.FadeFromTo(0, 1, durationInSeconds, false);
}
public static T FadeOut<T>(this T uiElement, int durationInSeconds)
{
  return uiElement.FadeFromTo(1, 0, durationInSeconds, false);
}

public static T FadeFromTo<T>(this T uiElement,
                              double fromOpacity, double toOpacity,
                              int durationInSeconds, bool loopAnimation)
where T : UIElement
{
  return (T)uiElement.wpfInvoke(()=>
  {
    var doubleAnimation =
      new DoubleAnimation(fromOpacity, toOpacity,
                          new Duration(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(durationInSeconds)));
    if(loopAnimation)
      doubleAnimation.RepeatBehavior = RepeatBehavior.Forever;
    uiElement.BeginAnimation(UIElement.OpacityProperty, doubleAnimation);
    return uiElement;
   });
}
share|improve this answer
    
Sweet, thanks I knew that there should be an easier way :) I works ok, except when I try to run one after the other (but I think that that might be some threading issue) –  Dinis Cruz Jun 16 '10 at 16:33
    
It is not a threading issue. Perhaps you are looking for Compose behavior. If so, pass HandoffBehavior.Compose as a third argument to BeginAnimation. On the other hand, perhaps you want to animate from the current value, in which case you should leave the default HandoffBehavior alone (it defaults to SnapshotAndReplace) but pass in null for "fromOpacity" in FadeIn and FadeOut. Note: To accept nulls, FadeFromTo needs to take arguments of type double? and construct the DoubleAnimation thusly: new DoubleAnimation { From = fromOpacity, To=toOpacity, Duration = ... }; –  Ray Burns Jun 16 '10 at 16:55
add comment

Here is the solution for the Grid.

Where the Grid is **<Grid Name="RootGrid" Opacity="0">**

 this.Dispatcher.Invoke(DispatcherPriority.Background, new Action(() =>
            {
                var doubleAnimation = new DoubleAnimation(0, 1, new Duration(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(5)));
                RootGrid.BeginAnimation(UIElement.OpacityProperty, doubleAnimation);
            }));
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.