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Here is the HTML:

<div id="outer">
    <div id="inner"></div>
    Test
</div>

And here is the CSS:

#inner {
    float: left;
    height: 100%;
}

Upon inspection with the Chrome developer tools, the inner div is getting a height of 0px.

How can I force it to be 100% of the height of the parent div?

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So you want the text in the outer div (not in the inner div), but the floated inner div to be the height of the outer div? –  edl Jun 15 '10 at 23:48
    
@edl: Yes. Exactly. –  Nathan Osman Jun 16 '10 at 0:03
    
What is the end result you are trying to achieve? I guess my confusion lies in that if the inner div is as high as the outer and the outer is as high as the text, isn't that the same as having the text in the inner div? –  edl Jun 16 '10 at 0:09
1  
@edl: Yes, it is :) The reason I want it this way is that the inner div has an image as its background. The text needs to be beside it. Both need to be inside the outer div as it has a background image too. –  Nathan Osman Jun 16 '10 at 0:24
11  
giveupandusetables.com –  Craig Walker Jun 16 '10 at 0:30
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5 Answers

up vote 60 down vote accepted

For #outer height to be based on its content, and have #inner base its height on that, make both elements absolutely positioned.

More details can be found in the spec for the css height property, but essentially, #inner must ignore #outer height if #outer's height is auto, unless #outer is positioned absolutely. Then #inner height will be 0, unless #inner itself is positioned absolutely.

<style>
    #outer {position:absolute; height:auto; width:200px; border: 1px solid red; }
    #inner {position:absolute; height:100%; width:20px; border: 1px solid black; }
</style>

<div id='outer'>
    <div id='inner'>
    </div>
    text
</div>

However... By positioning #inner absolutely, a float setting will be ignored, so you will need to choose a width for #inner explicitly, and add padding in #outer to fake the text wrapping I suspect you want. For example, below, the padding of #outer is the width of #inner +3. Conveniently (as the whole point was to get #inner height to 100%) there's no need to wrap text beneath #inner, so this will look just like #inner is floated.

<style>
    #outer2{padding-left: 23px;
            position:absolute; height:auto; width:200px; border: 1px solid red; }
    #inner2{left:0;
            position:absolute; height:100%; width:20px; border: 1px solid black; }
</style>

<div id='outer2'>
    <div id='inner2'>
    </div>
    text
</div>

I deleted my previous answer, as it was based on too many wrong assumptions about your goal.

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10  
You're a goddamn genius. I hope knowing this much css doesn't drive you mad, stay sane for us. –  Clayton Rabenda Oct 1 '13 at 18:31
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Actually, as long as the parent element is positioned, you can set the child's height to 100%. Namely, in case you don't want the parent to be absolutely positioned. Let me explain further:

<style>
    #outer2{padding-left: 23px;
        position: relative; height:auto; width:200px; border: 1px solid red; }
    #inner2{left:0;
        position:absolute; height:100%; width:20px; border: 1px solid black; }
</style>

<div id='outer2'>
    <div id='inner2'>
    </div>
    text
</div>
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5  
Cool, this is less limiting than Chadwick's requirement of position:absolute (which could interfere with a site's styles) –  henry May 16 '13 at 5:01
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As long as you don't need to support versions of Internet Explorer earlier than IE8, you can use display: table-cell to accomplish this:

HTML:

<div class="outer">
    <div class="inner">
        <p>Menu or Whatever</p>
    </div>
    <div class="inner">
        <p>Page contents...</p>
    </div>
</div>

CSS:

.inner {
    display: table-cell;
}

This will force each element with the .inner class to occupy the full height of its parent element.

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Although this will work, it won't show a margin, even if you specify one. So this solution will fail if you want to assign a margin. You can assign padding as a work-around, but how would you solve this if you needed a margin (& not padding)? –  Devner Sep 2 '13 at 12:10
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I made an example resolving your problem.

You have to make a wrapper, float it, then position absolute your div and give to it 100% height.

HTML

<div class="container">
    <div class="left">"Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum." </div>
  <div class="right-wrapper">
    <div class="right">"Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua." </div>
  </div>
  <div class="clear">&nbsp;</div>
</div>

CSS:

.container {
    width: 100%;
    position:relative;
}
.left {
    width: 50%;
    background-color: rgba(0, 0, 255, 0.6);
    float: left;
}
.right-wrapper {
    width: 48%;
    float: left;
}
.right {
    height: 100%;
    position: absolute;
}

Explanation: The .right div is absolutely positioned. That means that its width and height, and top and left positiones will be calculed based on the first parent div absolutely or relative positioned ONLY if width or height properties are explicitly declared in CSS; if they aren't explicty declared, those properties will be calculed based on the parent container (.right-wrapper).

So, the 100% height of the DIV will be calculed based on .container final height, and the final position of .right position will be calculed based on the parent container.

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If you're prepared to use a little jQuery, the answer is simple!

$(document).ready(function(e) {

  $('.parent').find('.child').css('height', $('.parent').innerHeight());

}

This works well for floating a single element to a side with 100% height of it's parent while other floated elements which would normally wrap around are kept to one side.

Hope this helps fellow jQuery fans.

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