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Is it possible to "break" from a Groovy each Closure?

Or should I be using a classic loop instead?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 70 down vote accepted

Nope, you can't abort an "each" without throwing an exception. You likely want a classic loop if you want the break to abort under a particular condition.

Alternatively, you could use a "find" closure instead of an each and return true when you would have done a break.

This example will abort before processing the whole list:

def a = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]

a.find { 
    if (it > 5) return true // break
    println it  // do the stuff that you wanted to before break
    return false // keep looping
}

Prints

1
2
3
4
5

but doesn't print 6 or 7.

It's also really easy to write your own iterator methods with custom break behavior that accept closures:

List.metaClass.eachUntilGreaterThanFive = { closure ->
    for ( value in delegate ) {
        if ( value  > 5 ) break
        closure(value)
    }
}

def a = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]

a.eachUntilGreaterThanFive {
    println it
}

Also prints:

1
2
3
4
5    
share|improve this answer
    
Great thanks. "find" is actually perfect for my requirement. –  tinny Jun 16 '10 at 2:38
1  
I've also submitted a patch to groovy that adds a findResult method that does a short-circuited find that returns the first non-null result from the closure. This method could be used to cover almost all situations that someone might want to break out of an each early. Check the patch to see if it gets accepted and rolled into groovy (I'm hoping by 1.8): jira.codehaus.org/browse/GROOVY-4253 –  Ted Naleid Jun 23 '10 at 3:07
1  
I've tried this case : def a = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, -1, -2] It returned 1 2 3 4 5 -1 -2 . So, "breaK" does not work. –  Phat H. VU Dec 6 '13 at 8:12

Replace each loop with any closure.

def list = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
list.any { element ->
    if (element == 2)
        return // continue

    println element

    if (element == 3)
        return true // break
}

Output

1
3
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Just a trick. What happens if there is a statement after "break". This statement will be still exectured after meet "break". –  Phat H. VU Dec 7 '13 at 5:54
1  
@Phat H. VU I've added return. The statement after "break" won't be executed –  Michal Zmuda Dec 7 '13 at 17:13
    
Thanks for your reply. You're right. I also vote up your answer. More : the any method is defined in DefaultGroovyMethods and it is a predicate function that returns true if an element in a collection satisfies the supplied predicate closure. –  Phat H. VU Dec 9 '13 at 1:57
    
Using any() in this way is a bit misleading, but it certainly does work and gives you the ability to break or continue. –  vegemite4me May 15 at 16:52

No, you can't break from a closure in Groovy without throwing an exception. Also, you shouldn't use exceptions for control flow.

If you find yourself wanting to break out of a closure you should probably first think about why you want to do this and not how to do it. The first thing to consider could be the substitution of the closure in question with one of Groovy's (conceptual) higher order functions. The following example:

for ( i in 1..10) { if (i < 5) println i; else return}

becomes

(1..10).each{if (it < 5) println it}

becomes

(1..10).findAll{it < 5}.each{println it} 

which also helps clarity. It states the intent of your code much better.

The potential drawback in the shown examples is that iteration only stops early in the first example. If you have performance considerations you might want to stop it right then and there.

However, for most use cases that involve iterations you can usually resort to one of Groovy's find, grep, collect, inject, etc. methods. They usually take some "configuration" and then "know" how to do the iteration for you, so that you can actually avoid imperative looping wherever possible.

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Just using special Closure

// declare and implement:
def eachWithBreak = { list, Closure c ->
  boolean bBreak = false
  list.each() { it ->
     if (bBreak) return
     bBreak = c(it)
  }
}

def list = [1,2,3,4,5,6]
eachWithBreak list, { it ->
  if (it > 3) return true // break 'eachWithBreak'
  println it
  return false // next it
}
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You could break by RETURN. For example

  def a = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]
  def ret = 0
  a.each {def n ->
    if (n > 5) {
      ret = n
      return ret
    }
  }

It works for me!

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4  
it is plain wrong, return exits the clojure only –  mrembisz Aug 23 '11 at 20:01
1  
Which is exactly what the OP asked, even though it's obviously not what he meant. –  Szocske Aug 26 '13 at 18:54

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