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I have a question about the following code:

#include <iostream>
#include <boost/scoped_ptr.hpp>

class Interface
{
};

class A : public Interface
{
    public:
        A() { std::cout << "A()" << std::endl; }
        virtual ~A() { std::cout << "~A()" << std::endl; }
};


Interface* get_a()
{
    A* a = new A;
    return a;
}

int main()
{
    {
        std::cout << "1" << std::endl;
        boost::scoped_ptr<Interface> x(get_a());
        std::cout << "2" << std::endl;
    }
    std::cout << "3" << std::endl;
}

It creates the following output:

1
A()
2
3

As you can see, it doesn't call the destructor of A. The only way I see to get the destructor of A being called, is to add a destructor for the Interface class like this:

virtual ~Interface() { }

But I really want to avoid any Implementation in my Interface class and virtual ~Interface() = 0; doesn't work (produces some linker errors complaining about a non existing implementation of ~Interface().

So my question is: What do I have to change in order to make the destructor being called, but (if possible) leave the Interface as an Interface (only abstract methods).

share|improve this question
    
This question essentially overlaps with: stackoverflow.com/questions/270917/… – Owen S. Jun 15 '10 at 23:35
2  
You can combine =0 with an empty body to avoid the error, but there's little benefit in doing so. This is C++, and there is no such thing as an "interface" - it's all just classes - so there's no good reason to avoid functions with bodies. Especially in such an idiomatic case as a virtual destructor. – Pavel Minaev Jun 15 '10 at 23:37
    
I removed the smart pointer tags since this isn't really related about smart pointers, it's about base class destructors. – James McNellis Jun 15 '10 at 23:48
up vote 5 down vote accepted

You must define a virtual destructor in the base class, otherwise you'll get no polymorphic behavior.

And more importantly, you get undefined behavior otherwise; §5.3.5/3:

If the static type of the operand is different from its dynamic type, the static type shall be a base class of the operand’s dynamic type and the static type shall have a virtual destructor or the behavior is undefined.

Emphasis mine.


I'd argue the best is this one:

class Interface
{
public:
    virtual ~Interface(void) = 0;
};

inline Interface::~Interface(void) {}

The compiler can easily inline this, unlike a solution where the implementation resides in a source file. (Speaking of which, this solution doesn't even mandate you have one.) It also leaves the class pure virtual.

share|improve this answer
    
The other solution (with function outside the body of the class) does not require a source file - you can declare it right there in the header so long as it's inline. There is also a very hypothetical possibility that the compiler will completely elide the vtable for a given class if all its functions are pure virtual, including destructor (there is a potentially observable difference due to vtable switching during construction/destruction) - it's normally so marginal that it's not worth the bother, but I worked with a codebase where we actually needed __novtable regularly once... – Pavel Minaev Jun 15 '10 at 23:44
    
@Pavel: You're right. So right that I'm changing my post. :P – GManNickG Jun 15 '10 at 23:46
    
Thanks! That really seems to be the best solution for this problem :) – bb-generation Jun 15 '10 at 23:48

You need to define a pure virtual version of the Interface destructor, but you need to also define the body of the destructor. This is a sort of weird case in C++ where even though the function is virtual it must be defined because after the A destructor is called, the Instance destructor will also be called.

Thus the correct answer is:

virtual ~Interface() = 0;

And later, in a cpp file:

Interface::~Interface() {}
share|improve this answer
2  
Interface is simple enough that it might be fine to leave that destructor inline. – Billy ONeal Jun 15 '10 at 23:39

You must declare the destructor virtual if you want to delete derived-class objects via a pointer to your base class interface type, and that destructor must have an implementation.

You may still declare it pure virtual, though:

class Interface
{
public:
    virtual ~Interface() = 0;
};

inline Interface::~Interface() { }
share|improve this answer
3  
You can't do this as written - while pure virtual functions can have bodies, you can't have a function definition and =0 all in one. You have to put a declaration (with no body) but with =0 in class body, and the actual definition (with a body) outside, properly qualified. – Pavel Minaev Jun 15 '10 at 23:35
    
Clever. I learn another new thing. – Loki Astari Jun 15 '10 at 23:36
1  
@Pavel: Thanks... I should have learned by now not to use Visual C++ to check syntax :-) – James McNellis Jun 15 '10 at 23:37
    
@James: comeaucomputing.com/tryitout is indispensable for every StackOverflow C++ ninja for precisely this reason :) – Pavel Minaev Jun 15 '10 at 23:41
    
+1 For having the in-header inline destructor first. – GManNickG Jun 15 '10 at 23:46

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