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I have an object which has both a copy constructor and assignment operator defined. It is enclosed inside a shared pointer.

I want to make another shared pointer that contains a copy of the original shared pointer (i.e. new shared pointer to a new memory location, which however, has the same data as the original object).

Thanks for any assistance.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You invoke the copy constructor when creating the new object:

std::shared_ptr<C> ptr1(new C());      // invokes the default constructor
std::shared_ptr<C> ptr2(new C(*ptr1)); // invokes the copy constructor

In this case, it's really no different than if you have regular, dumb pointers.

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I find the question slightly hard to read, but is that what the OP is asking? Or are they asking how to create another shared pointer to the object? –  Loki Astari Jun 16 '10 at 10:34
    
@Martin: I think so, but I'm not sure now. The "pointer to a new memory location" was what led me to this being the answer, but I could be wrong. –  James McNellis Jun 16 '10 at 13:42
    
James you read my question correctly the first time, and the answer was exactly what I was looking for. Reading back, I am amazed how you made any sense of my question. Many hours of debugging had left my brain quite scrambled... Thanks for the answe again. –  user367848 Jun 21 '10 at 20:12

Often I'll be using shared pointers with polymoprphic types. In this case you can't use the method suggested by James McNellis.

class Base
{
 ...
  virtual void doSomething()=0;
};

class Derived : public Base
{
  ...
  void doSomething() { ... }
};

std::shared_ptr<Base> ptr(new Derived);
std::shared_ptr<Base> cpy( new Base( *ptr ) ); // THIS DOES NOT COMPILE!

So what I do instead is to add a clone function into the base class, and implement it in the derived classes.

class Base
{
 ...
  virtual void doSomething()=0;
  virtual std::shared_ptr<Base> clone() const =0;
};

class Derived : public Base
{
  ...
  void doSomething() { ... }
  std::shared_ptr<Base> clone() const 
  { 
     return std::shared_ptr<Base>( new Derived( *this ) );
  }
};


std::shared_ptr<Base> ptr(new Derived);
std::shared_ptr<Base> cpy = ptr->clone();
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Actually the the top case does compile if you have no pure virtual functions. you just wont get a proper copy of the object, it'll get sliced to the base class... –  Michael Anderson Jun 16 '10 at 3:06
2  
And you probably want your clone method to return a Base*, so derived classes can take advantage of covarient return types –  Terry Mahaffey Jun 16 '10 at 3:13
2  
... plus having shared_ptr in your class interface adds unneeded coupling. You are forcing (shared_ptr cannot relinquish ownership) your users into using an specific type of smart pointer regardless or their use of the data. They might prefer using scoped_ptr, or unique_ptr, or a pointer container that handles ownership. Maybe even their own (locking?) smart pointer... The decision of smart pointer should be in the receiving call, where the most information is known. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 16 '10 at 7:42
    
C++ gets very ham-fisted with this sort of thing. Writing a one-liner clone function for every descendant class? Laaaaame. –  Andres Jaan Tack Jun 16 '10 at 10:16
    
@David Its a trade off, but returning a shared pointer allows me to control the destruction of the object, rather than the caller. Otherwise using a caching, or my own allocators can lead to trouble. Now there are ways around some of those issues, but they'd obscure the core of the idea. –  Michael Anderson Jun 16 '10 at 10:26

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