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I'm trying to build my own MVC as a practice and learning experience. So far, this is what I have (index.php):

<?php
require "config.php";

$page = $_GET['page'];
if( isset( $page ) ) { 
    if( file_exists( MVCROOT . "/$page.php" ) ) {
        include "$page.php";
    } else {
        header("HTTP/1.0 404 Not Found");
    }
}


?>

My problem here is, I can't use header to send to a 404 because the headers have been sent already. Should I just redirect to a 404.html or is there a better way? Feel free to critique what I have so far (it's very little). I would love suggestions and ideas. Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Try removing or commenting out the echo "isset is true" line. –  BoltClock Jun 16 '10 at 3:13
    
Oh yes, i was using that for testing purposes. Let me remove that. –  Strawberry Jun 16 '10 at 3:17
    
What happens if $_GET['page'] is '../../../../etc/passwd'? (i.e. example.com/index.php?page=../../../../etc/passwd) –  dbemerlin Jun 29 '10 at 14:30
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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Standard practice in MVC frameworks is to use output buffering (ob_start(), ob_get_contents(), and ob_end_clean()) to control how, when, and what gets sent to the user.

This way, as long as you capture your framework's output, it doesn't get sent to the user until you want it to.

To load the 404, you would use (for example):

<?php
require "config.php";

$page = $_GET['page'];
ob_start();

if (isset($page)) {
    echo "isset is true";
    if (file_exists(MVCROOT."/$page.php")) {
        include MVCROOT."/$page.php";
        $output = ob_get_contents();
        ob_end_clean();
        echo $output;
    } else {
        ob_end_clean(); //we don't care what was there
        header("HTTP/1.0 404 Not Found");
        include MVCROOT."/error_404.php"; // or echo a message, etc, etc
    }
}
?>

Hope that helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I like this! –  Strawberry Jun 16 '10 at 3:21
    
I'm expecting some 404 message, but it's just a blank page on Firefox. It says broken on other browsers. –  Strawberry Jun 16 '10 at 3:37
    
A lot of times, if there is no content along with the response code, then the browser will supply their own. Try adding your own 404 page after the header. I'll update my answer. –  Austin Hyde Jun 16 '10 at 3:40
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Im not very good at english but i will try; the 404 error trigers on the server before running any code (because is suposse that the page does not exist, so there is no code).

So, if you want to give the user a 404 error seeking for the error in a php code, you must use a simple redirection to a 404.html.

In other hand, if you have access to the server config files you can program this on the server instead of a web page running on it. You can use WAMP to practice...

I hope you understand me. Cyaa

EDIT i must add:

$page = $_GET['page'];

This will give you an error if $_GET['page'] is not set, you MUST check for isset($_GET['page']) before trying using it.

share|improve this answer
    
Don't exactly agree with the edit part. –  Strawberry Jun 16 '10 at 3:20
1  
@Doug, it won't give you an error, but it will give a warning. You should do something like $page = isset($_GET['page'])?$_GET['page']:null; That way, no warnings are generated, and you know the exact value of $page in the event $_GET['page'] is not set. –  Austin Hyde Jun 16 '10 at 4:28
    
I actually never knew it generated an error. I see it now. I stand corrected. Thanks for showing me that guys! –  Strawberry Jun 16 '10 at 6:52
    
thats right, not an error, a warning... still improving my english :) –  DomingoSL Jun 18 '10 at 0:10
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You should either redirect or simply include it, here is modified code:

require "config.php";

$page = $_GET['page'];
if( isset( $page ) ) { 
    echo "isset is true";
    if( file_exists( MVCROOT . "/$page.php" ) ) {
        include  MVCROOT . "$page.php";
    } else {
        include  MVCROOT . "404.html";
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's just including a page telling a user about the 404 error, with the actual HTTP 404 header totally gone. –  BoltClock Jun 16 '10 at 3:13
    
@BoltClock: Yes that's true, it is basically to this sentence of the OP Should I just redirect to a 404.html –  Sarfraz Jun 16 '10 at 3:16
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