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in the System.Linq namespace, we can now extend our IEnumerable's to have theAny() and Count() extension methods.

I was told recently that if i want to check that a collection contains 1 or more items inside it, I should use the .Any() extension method instead of the .Count() > 0 extension method because the .Count() extension method has to iterate through all the items.

Secondly, some collections have a property (not an extension method) that is Count or Length. Would it be better to use those, instead of .Any() or .Count() ?

yea / nae ?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 294 down vote accepted

If you are starting with something that has a .Length or .Count (such as ICollection<T>, IList<T>, List<T>, etc) - then this will be the fastest option, since it doesn't need to go through the GetEnumerator()/MoveNext()/Dispose() sequence required by Any() to check for a non-empty IEnumerable<T> sequence.

For just IEnumerable<T>, then Any() will generally be quicker, as it only has to look at one iteration. However, note that the LINQ-to-Objects implementation of Count() does check for ICollection<T> (using .Count as an optimisation) - so if your underlying data-source is directly a list/collection, there won't be a huge difference. Don't ask me why it doesn't use the non-generic ICollection...

Of course, if you have used LINQ to filter it etc (Where etc), you will have an iterator-block based sequence, and so this ICollection<T> optimisation is useless.

In general with IEnumerable<T> : stick with Any() ;-p

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3  
Marc: ICollection<T> does not actually derive from ICollection. I was surprised too, but Reflector doesn't lie. –  Bryan Watts Nov 25 '08 at 22:45
4  
Doesn't Any() implementation check for ICollection interface and check after for Count property? –  derigel Sep 29 '09 at 8:35
4  
No, it doesn't (having checked reflector) –  Marc Gravell Sep 29 '09 at 20:24
125  
I think there is another reason for using Any() most of the time. It signals the precise intent of the developer. If you are not interested in knowing the number of items, but only if there are some, then somecollection.Any() is simpler and clearer than somecollection.Count > 0 –  T.J.Kjaer Nov 22 '10 at 8:21
1  
An even better option may be to create your own IsEmpty() extension method that tries to cast to collection or array (to use Count or Length), and falls back on Any(). Optimised in all cases, and makes intent clear. –  Eldritch Conundrum Dec 19 '13 at 9:53

OK, I've just had situation in which Count is faster by order of magnitude on SQL server (EntityFramework 4). Here is query that thew timeout exception (on ~200.000 records):

con = db.Contacts.
    Where(a => a.CompanyId == companyId && a.ContactStatusId <= (int) Const.ContactStatusEnum.Reactivated
        && !a.NewsletterLogs.Any(b => b.NewsletterLogTypeId == (int) Const.NewsletterLogTypeEnum.Unsubscr)
    ).OrderBy(a => a.ContactId).
    Skip(position - 1).
    Take(1).FirstOrDefault();

Count version executed in matter of milliseconds:

con = db.Contacts.
    Where(a => a.CompanyId == companyId && a.ContactStatusId <= (int) Const.ContactStatusEnum.Reactivated
        && a.NewsletterLogs.Count(b => b.NewsletterLogTypeId == (int) Const.NewsletterLogTypeEnum.Unsubscr) == 0
    ).OrderBy(a => a.ContactId).
    Skip(position - 1).
    Take(1).FirstOrDefault();

I need to find a way to see what exact SQL both LINQs produce - but it's obvious there is a huge performance difference between Count and Any in some cases, and you can't just stick with Any in all cases.

EDIT: Here are generated SQLs. Beauties as you can see ;)

ANY:

exec sp_executesql N'SELECT TOP (1) 
[Project2].[ContactId] AS [ContactId], 
[Project2].[CompanyId] AS [CompanyId], 
[Project2].[ContactName] AS [ContactName], 
[Project2].[FullName] AS [FullName], 
[Project2].[ContactStatusId] AS [ContactStatusId], 
[Project2].[Created] AS [Created]
FROM ( SELECT [Project2].[ContactId] AS [ContactId], [Project2].[CompanyId] AS [CompanyId], [Project2].[ContactName] AS [ContactName], [Project2].[FullName] AS [FullName], [Project2].[ContactStatusId] AS [ContactStatusId], [Project2].[Created] AS [Created], row_number() OVER (ORDER BY [Project2].[ContactId] ASC) AS [row_number]
    FROM ( SELECT 
        [Extent1].[ContactId] AS [ContactId], 
        [Extent1].[CompanyId] AS [CompanyId], 
        [Extent1].[ContactName] AS [ContactName], 
        [Extent1].[FullName] AS [FullName], 
        [Extent1].[ContactStatusId] AS [ContactStatusId], 
        [Extent1].[Created] AS [Created]
        FROM [dbo].[Contact] AS [Extent1]
        WHERE ([Extent1].[CompanyId] = @p__linq__0) AND ([Extent1].[ContactStatusId] <= 3) AND ( NOT EXISTS (SELECT 
            1 AS [C1]
            FROM [dbo].[NewsletterLog] AS [Extent2]
            WHERE ([Extent1].[ContactId] = [Extent2].[ContactId]) AND (6 = [Extent2].[NewsletterLogTypeId])
        ))
    )  AS [Project2]
)  AS [Project2]
WHERE [Project2].[row_number] > 99
ORDER BY [Project2].[ContactId] ASC',N'@p__linq__0 int',@p__linq__0=4

COUNT:

exec sp_executesql N'SELECT TOP (1) 
[Project2].[ContactId] AS [ContactId], 
[Project2].[CompanyId] AS [CompanyId], 
[Project2].[ContactName] AS [ContactName], 
[Project2].[FullName] AS [FullName], 
[Project2].[ContactStatusId] AS [ContactStatusId], 
[Project2].[Created] AS [Created]
FROM ( SELECT [Project2].[ContactId] AS [ContactId], [Project2].[CompanyId] AS [CompanyId], [Project2].[ContactName] AS [ContactName], [Project2].[FullName] AS [FullName], [Project2].[ContactStatusId] AS [ContactStatusId], [Project2].[Created] AS [Created], row_number() OVER (ORDER BY [Project2].[ContactId] ASC) AS [row_number]
    FROM ( SELECT 
        [Project1].[ContactId] AS [ContactId], 
        [Project1].[CompanyId] AS [CompanyId], 
        [Project1].[ContactName] AS [ContactName], 
        [Project1].[FullName] AS [FullName], 
        [Project1].[ContactStatusId] AS [ContactStatusId], 
        [Project1].[Created] AS [Created]
        FROM ( SELECT 
            [Extent1].[ContactId] AS [ContactId], 
            [Extent1].[CompanyId] AS [CompanyId], 
            [Extent1].[ContactName] AS [ContactName], 
            [Extent1].[FullName] AS [FullName], 
            [Extent1].[ContactStatusId] AS [ContactStatusId], 
            [Extent1].[Created] AS [Created], 
            (SELECT 
                COUNT(1) AS [A1]
                FROM [dbo].[NewsletterLog] AS [Extent2]
                WHERE ([Extent1].[ContactId] = [Extent2].[ContactId]) AND (6 = [Extent2].[NewsletterLogTypeId])) AS [C1]
            FROM [dbo].[Contact] AS [Extent1]
        )  AS [Project1]
        WHERE ([Project1].[CompanyId] = @p__linq__0) AND ([Project1].[ContactStatusId] <= 3) AND (0 = [Project1].[C1])
    )  AS [Project2]
)  AS [Project2]
WHERE [Project2].[row_number] > 99
ORDER BY [Project2].[ContactId] ASC',N'@p__linq__0 int',@p__linq__0=4

Seems that pure Where with EXISTS works much worse than calculating Count and then doing Where with Count == 0.

Let me know if you guys see some error in my findings. What can be taken out of all this regardless of Any vs Count discussion is that any more complex LINQ is way better off when rewritten as Stored Procedure ;).

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Would love to see some Sql Query plans that are generated by each linq-query for each scenario. –  Pure.Krome Jun 15 '12 at 0:50
14  
based on the SQL, all I can say is: both queries look horrible. I knew there was a reason I normally write my own TSQL... –  Marc Gravell Jun 15 '12 at 7:29

For SQL Server and EF4-6, Count() performs about two times faster than Any().

When you run Table.Any(), it will generate something like(alert: don't hurt the brain trying to understand it)

SELECT 
CASE WHEN ( EXISTS (SELECT 
    1 AS [C1]
    FROM [Table] AS [Extent1]
)) THEN cast(1 as bit) WHEN ( NOT EXISTS (SELECT 
    1 AS [C1]
    FROM [Table] AS [Extent2]
)) THEN cast(0 as bit) END AS [C1]
FROM  ( SELECT 1 AS X ) AS [SingleRowTable1]

that requires 2 scans of rows with your condition.

I don't like to write Count() > 0 because it hides my intention. I prefer to use custom predicate for this:

public static class QueryExtensions
{
    public static bool Exists<TSource>(this IQueryable<TSource> source, Expression<Func<TSource, bool>> predicate)
    {
        return source.Count(predicate) > 0;
    }
}
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Well, the .Count() extension method won't use the .Count property, but I would assume you wouldn't use the .Count() method for a simple collection, but rather at the end of a LINQ statement with filtering criteria, etc.

In that context, .Any() will be faster than .Count() > 0.

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6  
Actually, for an ICollection<T>, it will. But as you say - this doesn't help once you have filtered etc –  Marc Gravell Nov 20 '08 at 12:45

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