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I am using a buffered writer and my code, closes the writer in the finally block. My code is like this.

 ...........
    BufferedWriter theBufferedWriter = null;
    try{
    theBufferedWriter =.....
    ....
    ......
    .....
    } catch (IOException anException) {
    ....
    } finally {
        try {
            theBufferedWriter.close();              
        } catch (IOException anException) {
            anException.printStackTrace();
            }
    }

I have to use the try catch inside the clean up code in finally as theBufferedWriter might also throw an IOException. I do not want to throw this exception to the calling methos. Is it a good practice to use a try catch in finally? If not what is the alternative? Please suggest.

Regards, Hiral

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it's ok, but to check null first is better. –  qrtt1 Jun 16 '10 at 7:10
    
+1 Its not pretty but it has to be done –  David Relihan Jun 16 '10 at 8:38

6 Answers 6

up vote 10 down vote accepted

A somewhat nicer way to do this is to use IOUtils.closeQuiety from Apache commons-io. It keeps your code tidy and eliminates some of the boilerplate that's inherent in Java.

You code then becomes:

BufferedWriter theBufferedWriter = null;
try{
    theBufferedWriter = ...
    ...
} catch (IOException anException) {
    ...
} finally {
    IOUtils.closeQuietly(theBufferedWriter);
}

Much nicer and more expressive.

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3  
Closing a buffered writer like this is risky; if characters remain in the buffer and close throws an exception when trying to write them, the data is truncated and your application does not handle the error. To make this safe, you'd need to call close just before the catch block. –  McDowell Jun 16 '10 at 8:46
1  
@McDowell: Good to know. Presumably you could call flush() before the catch block too, right? –  scompt.com Jun 16 '10 at 9:09
1  
closing the buffer will flush it (see the javadoc). In case it isn't clear, this pattern requires close to be called twice. If you moved the try/finally{close} into the existing try block, you'd 1) only need to call close once 2) avoid the redundant null assignment 3) not need to import a 3rd party library. Nested trys look ugly, but you usually can't make decisions about error handling this locally anyway, so the catch block would be in a caller further up the call stack. illegalargumentexception.blogspot.com/2008/10/… –  McDowell Jun 16 '10 at 12:01

Absolutely. I would say that the way you have written it is the way to go.

The only remark I have is the usual one; don't ignore exceptions.

I agree that it looks a bit clunky and there is indeed an proposal for improvement for this kind of situations: Automatic Resource Management Blocks, Joshua Bloch.

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Or you can use Lombok and the @Cleanup annotation and you shall never write a try catch inside finally again.

This is how you would normally write it (Note the throws IOException):

//Vanilly Java

import java.io.*;

public class CleanupExample {
  public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {
    InputStream in = new FileInputStream(args[0]);
    try {
      OutputStream out = new FileOutputStream(args[1]);
      try {
        byte[] b = new byte[10000];
        while (true) {
          int r = in.read(b);
          if (r == -1) break;
          out.write(b, 0, r);
        }
      } finally {
        out.close();
      }
    } finally {
      in.close();
    }
  }
}

Now with Lombok you just write @Cleanup on the streams

import lombok.Cleanup;
import java.io.*;

 public class CleanupExample {
   public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {
     @Cleanup InputStream in = new FileInputStream(args[0]);
     @Cleanup OutputStream out = new FileOutputStream(args[1]);
     byte[] b = new byte[10000];
     while (true) {
       int r = in.read(b);
       if (r == -1) break;
       out.write(b, 0, r);
     }
   }
 }
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This is what we will have to live with until Java 7 and ARM Blocks.

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It's OK but you should test if theBufferedWriter is not null before closing it.
You could also do:

BufferedWriter theBufferedWriter;
try {
    theBufferedWriter = new ...
    try {
        ...
    } finally {
        try {
            theBufferedWriter.close();
        } catch (IOException closeException) {
            closeException.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
} catch (IOException anException) {
    ...
}

or:

BufferedWriter theBufferedWriter;
try {
    theBufferedWriter = new ...
} catch (IOException createException) {
    // do something with createException 
    return;  // assuming we are in a method returning void
}

try {
    ...
} catch (IOException anException) {
    ...
    // assuming we don't return here
}

try {
    theBufferedWriter.close();
} catch (IOException closeException) {
    closeException.printStackTrace();
}

but mostly I do such operations (e.g. writing a file) in a dedicated method and prefer to throw the/an Exception so the caller can handle it (e.g. asking for another file, stopping the application, ...):

void someMethod(...) throws IOException {
    BufferedWriter theBufferedWriter = new ...

    try {
        ...
    } catch (IOExcepption anException) {
        try {
            theBufferedWriter.close();
        } catch (IOException closeException) {
            closeException.printStackTrace();
            // closeException is not thrown, anException represents the main/first problem
        }
        throw anException;
    }

    theBufferedWriter.close();  //  throws the Exception, if any
}

Please note: English is not my first nor my second language, any help would be appreciated

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It's ok to put a try-catch in a finally. It is the tool that does what you want to do. However, I feel the thrown IOException on close is uncommon enough that I would allow it to suppress any exception in the body like so.

try {
    BufferedWriter writer = .....
    try {
        .....
    } finally {
       writer.close();
    }
 } catch (IOException e) {
     ....
 }
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