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Is there an easy way within C# to check to see if a DateTime instance has been assigned a value or not?

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up vote 38 down vote accepted

The only way of having a variable which hasn't been assigned a value in C# is for it to be a local variable - in which case at compile-time you can tell that it isn't definitely assigned by trying to read from it :)

I suspect you really want Nullable<DateTime> (or DateTime? with the C# syntactic sugar) - make it null to start with and then assign a normal DateTime value (which will be converted appropriately). Then you can just compare with null (or use the HasValue property) to see whether a "real" value has been set.

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how about checking if the value is equal to default datetime value. Is there any unnoticeable downside to this approach? if(request.StartDateTime == default(DateTime) { request.StartDateTime = DateTime.Now; } – Menol May 13 at 8:33
2  
@Menol: Well that doesn't tell the difference between a field which has deliberately been given a value of default(DateTime) and one which was just that way to start with. Basically it's treating one value within the domain as "special and unavailable for normal use" which I dislike. – Jon Skeet May 13 at 8:54

do you mean like so:

DateTime datetime = new DateTime();

if (datetime == DateTime.MinValue)
{
    //unassigned
}

or you could use Nullable

DateTime? datetime = null;

 if (!datetime.HasValue)
 {
     //unassigned
 }
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35  
wow! outvoted THE Jon Skeet! – testpattern Sep 25 '13 at 8:28
4  
Only the second of these is bullet-proof. The first assumes something about the unset representation of a DateTime that is not guaranteed by the framework. Personally I think they should have added an Unset static member for this scenario. – Rupert Rawnsley Oct 10 '13 at 12:51
5  
To add on what @RupertRawnsley said, you should actually compare with default(DateTime), which is the value of an unassigned DateTime. It just so happens to be equal to MinValue, but it could change. – Tsahi Asher Jan 6 '15 at 12:48

put this somewhere:

public static class DateTimeUtil //or whatever name
{
    public static bool IsEmpty(this DateTime dateTime)
    {
        return dateTime == default(DateTime);
    }
}

then:

DateTime datetime;

if (datetime.IsEmpty())
{
    //unassigned
}
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Use Nullable<DateTime> if possible.

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DateTime is value type, so it can not never be null. If you think DateTime? ( Nullable ) you can use:

DateTime? something = GetDateTime();
bool isNull = (something == null);
bool isNull2 = !something.HasValue;
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I just found out that GetHashCode() for an unassigned datetime is always zero. I am not sure if this is a good way to check for null datetime, because, I can't find any documentation on why this behavior is displayed.

if(dt.GetHashCode()==0)
{
    Console.WriteLine("DateTime is unassigned"); 
} 
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GetHashCode returns 0 because of ticks (internal representation of DateTime) are also equal to 0. Hash code calculated by the following way: unchecked((int)ticks) ^ (int)(ticks >> 32);. Also see here: referencesource.microsoft.com/#mscorlib/system/datetime.cs,836 – KvanTTT Mar 18 at 21:50

I'd say the default value is always new DateTime(). So we can write

DateTime datetime;

if (datetime == new DateTime())
{
    //unassigned
}
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This Solution was already given by +Hath in 2008 and, as +Rupert Rawnsley added as comment, is not bullet-proof... – Roland Bär May 21 '14 at 14:16

I generally prefer, where possible, to use the default value of value types to determine whether they've been set. This obviously isn't possible all the time, especially with ints - but for DateTimes, I think reserving the MinValue to signify that it hasn't been changed is fair enough. The benefit of this over nullables is that there's one less place where you'll get a null reference exception (and probably lots of places where you don't have to check for null before accessing it!)

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