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#include "stdafx.h"

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    string s = "Haven't got an idea why.";
    auto beg =  s.begin();
    auto end = s.end();
    while (beg < end)
    {
        cout << *beg << '\n';
        if (*beg == 'a')
        {//whithout if construct it works perfectly
            beg = s.erase(beg);
        }
        ++beg;
    }
    return 0;
}

Why if I erase one or more chars from this string this code breaks? I suppose it has something to do with returned iterator after erase operation being created at higher address than end iterator but I'm not sure and it surely isn't right behaviour. Or is it?

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It's probably easier to erase characters from end() to begin(), since begin() won't change while erasing characters. –  MSalters Jun 16 '10 at 10:45

6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

There are several problems with this code.

  1. Don't cache the value of s.end(); it changes as you delete elements.
  2. Don't use beg < end. The idiomatic approach is to write beg != end. If you try to iterate past end, the result is undefined, and a debug version of the string library may deliberately crash your process, so it is meaningless to use <.
  3. The iterator returned from s.erase(beg) might be s.end(), in which case ++beg takes you past the end.

Here's a (I think) correct version:

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    string s = "Haven't got an idea why.";
    for (auto beg = s.begin(); beg != s.end();)
    {
        cout << *beg << '\n';
        if (*beg == 'a')
        {//whithout if construct it works perfectly
            beg = s.erase(beg);
        }
        else
        {
            ++beg;
        }
    }
}

EDIT: I suggest accepting FredOverflow's answer. It is simpler and faster than the above.

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"Don't cache the value of s.end(); it changes as you delete elements." One of my main problems with auto. Look at auto end = s.end() and tell me that this is not misleading to language newcomers! [general comment; not referring specifically to this OP] –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 21 '11 at 22:30
    
@Tomalak: I agree that the non-self-evident meaning of auto is unfortunate, but are you suggesting that the choice to use auto was incorrect? –  Marcelo Cantos Jun 22 '11 at 3:12
    
@Marcelo: Not at all! –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 22 '11 at 8:38
    
@Tomalak: I just realized that my question was ambiguous, and I'm not sure which interpretation you were answering. So, just to be clear, I didn't mean, "Was I incorrect to use auto?". What I meant was, "Do you think the language designers chose poorly in co-opting auto for type inference?" Sorry for the confusion. –  Marcelo Cantos Jun 23 '11 at 0:01
    
@Marcel: Aha. The answer is now "yes, possibly". –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 23 '11 at 0:23

Erasing elements one by one from vectors or strings has quadratic complexity. There are better solutions with linear complexity:

#include <string>
#include <algorithm>

int main()
{
    std::string s = "Haven't got an idea why.";
    s.erase(std::remove(s.begin(), s.end(), 'a'), s.end());
    std::cout << s << std::endl;
}
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The previous s.end() value stored in end is invalid after s.erase(). Hence, do not use it.

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I'm sure you're right but it doesn't make much sense, does it? Why whould the end iterator be invalidated? –  There is nothing we can do Jun 16 '10 at 10:16
1  
@A-ha: It is invalidated by definition. The standard says so. –  Marcelo Cantos Jun 16 '10 at 10:18
1  
@A-ha What the standard says (as Marcelo correctly pointed out) has a good reason to be so. The iterator was looking at the end position of your string, and you deleted one character of it. It is only logical that its previous value is no longer valid. If you want to check against the new end, you must ask the container again (s.end()), not use a previously cached value. –  Daniel Daranas Jun 16 '10 at 10:20

Note the semantics of a basic_string and it's iterators.

From www.ski.com/tech/stl

Note also that, according to the C++ standard, basic_string has very unusual iterator invalidation semantics. Iterators may be invalidated by swap, reserve, insert, and erase (and by functions that are equivalent to insert and/or erase, such as clear, resize, append, and replace). Additionally, however, the first call to any non-const member function, including the non-const version of begin() or operator[], may invalidate iterators. (The intent of these iterator invalidation rules is to give implementors greater freedom in implementation techniques.)

Also what happens if

 beg = s.erase(beg);

Returns an iterator equivalent to end()

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On calling erase operation, stored end iterator pointer becomes invalid. So, use s.end() function in while loop condition

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You have to iterate from .end()-1 to .begin(). At the same time, it is not safe to use comparison operators other than == and !=.

Here's my code:

    vector<long long> myVector (my, my+myCount);
    //sort and iterate through top correlation data counts
    sort (myVector.begin(), myVector.end());
    cout << endl;
    int TopCorrelationDataCount = 0;
    bool myVectorIterator_lastItem = false;
    vector<long long>::iterator myVectorIterator=myVector.end()-1;
    while (true) {                      
        long long storedData = *myVectorIterator;
        cout << TopCorrelationDataCount << " " << storedData << endl;                       

        //prepare for next item
        TopCorrelationDataCount++;
        //if (TopCorrelationDataCount >= this->TopCorrelationDataSize) break;
        if (myVectorIterator_lastItem) break;
        myVectorIterator--;
        if (myVectorIterator==myVector.begin())
        {
            myVectorIterator_lastItem = true;
        }
    }

Note: It can't be done using an ordinary for, because you have to find out if ==.begin(). If it is, this will be your last iteration. You can't check if ==.begin()-1, as it will result in run time error.

If you only want to use to X items in a vector, use TopCorrelationDataCount.

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