Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've looked all over for more information on this, and would like to know why it happens.

Here's the code:

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN"
    "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html>
<head>
</head>
<body>
    <div style="position:absolute; top:200px; left:200px; height:200px; width:200px; border:1px solid black; filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.Matrix(sizingMethod='auto expand', M11=0.9886188373396114, M12=-0.15044199698646263, M21=0.15044199698646263, M22=0.9886188373396114);">
        <div style="position:absolute; top:10px; left:10px; border:1px solid darkblue;">
            I do not rotate in IE 8.
        </div>
    </div>
</body>
</html>

The problem is that absolutely or relatively positioned elements within a div that has been rotated using MS's dximagetransform.matrix do not inherit the transformation in IE 8.

IE 6 & 7 render correctly, and I can solve the IE8 problem by triggering compatibility mode, but I'd rather not do that. Does anyone have any experience with this? I'm using css3 transform on other browsers and using dximagetransform.matrix to achieve this effect in IE.

EDIT: Added the opening html tag. Problem still exists.

http://i45.tinypic.com/nf4gmq.png

share|improve this question
    
Is there no need to open the html tag? –  Babiker Jun 16 '10 at 16:45
    
Hmm, problem still exists. –  davydka Jun 16 '10 at 19:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think the position absolute stops the filter from inheriting. I found the same thing when I was experimenting with blur filters recently, except in that case I wanted a way to make the filters stop inheriting. I hadn't realised IE8 was different from IE6/7 in this respect.

Is this the effect you're trying to get?

Rotate in IE8 using margin instead of position

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN"
    "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html>
<head>
</head>
<body>
    <div style="position:absolute; top:200px; left:200px; height:200px; width:200px; border:1px solid black; filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.Matrix(sizingMethod='auto expand', M11=0.9886188373396114, M12=-0.15044199698646263, M21=0.15044199698646263, M22=0.9886188373396114);">
        <div style="margin-top:10px; margin-left:10px; border:1px solid darkblue;">
            I do not rotate in IE 8.
        </div>
    </div>
</body>
</html>

Of course, if you needed the child element absolutely position for a specific reason you may be out of luck (might be able to achieve something with floats, but it would depend exactly what you needed).

share|improve this answer
    
Hi RobertC, if that were true, how come I'm seeing partial implementation? Did you try your suggestion? When I try it, the issue still remains. In fact, it seems worse since it's now rotating off axis. tinypic.com/r/2dhis95/6 –  davydka Jun 17 '10 at 18:21
    
Sorry, I misunderstood your issue. –  robertc Jun 18 '10 at 0:14
    
Edited: I've tried answering the question you actually asked this time. –  robertc Jun 18 '10 at 0:29
    
Hi RobertC, Thank you for your replies. That is the effect I am going for. Floats are an interesting idea. Forcing 'Compatibility Mode' also solves the problem. This can be done by putting the following meta tag in the header. <meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="IE=EmulateIE7" > So, the real question I'm wondering is: Should this different/newer rendering in IE8 be considered more "correct", or should it be considered a bug? –  davydka Jun 18 '10 at 23:19
    
I think I prefer having a way to 'turn off' filters on descendent elements and still be able to position relative to the containing block, but I'm not sure if it's compatible with the way CSS transforms work in other browsers. –  robertc Jun 19 '10 at 10:12

I solved it magicaly just adding z-index: 1 to parent element with matrix filter. Well, any z-index should work.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Thanks man! That did the trick for me –  Jose Rui Santos Nov 29 '11 at 10:34
    
I lost 2 weeks founding this solution. I am so happy, IE looks like a basket with Easter eggs or even dungeon full of traps.. >:-[] –  Epsiloncool Apr 24 '12 at 22:30
    
Perfect solution! ...too bad the result looks like vomit. =( –  Clint Tseng May 24 '12 at 23:23
    
Woah, this saving me so much heart-ache, thanks a lot man this really helped!!! –  JackMahoney Dec 19 '13 at 1:06

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.