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my .bashrc has the following function

function myfile {
 file $1
}
export -f myfile

it works fine when i call it directly

rajesh@rajesh-desktop:~$ myfile out.ogv 
out.ogv: Ogg data, Skeleton v3.0

it does not work when i try to invoke it through exec

rajesh@rajesh-desktop:~$ find ./ -name *.ogv -exec myfile {} \;
find: `myfile': No such file or directory

is there a way to call bash script functions with exec?

Any help is greatly appreciated.

Update:

Thanks for the response Jim.

But that's exactly what I wanted to avoid in the first place, since I have lot of utility functions defined in my bash scripts, I wanted to use them with other useful commands like find -exec.

I totally see your point though, find can run executables, it has no idea that the argument passed is function defined in a script.

I will get the same error when I try to exec is on bash prompt.

$ exec myfile out.ogv

I was hoping that there may be some neat trick that exec could be given some hypothetical command like "bash -myscriptname -myfunctionname".

I guess I should try to find some way to create a bash script on the fly and run it with exec.

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This isn't a forum. Please don't post responses as answers to the question unless they are. –  Dennis Williamson Jun 16 '10 at 23:58
    
The reason I am doing is that add comment does not allow you to add code. –  sharrajesh Jun 17 '10 at 0:27
    
But editing your own original post allows you to add as much code as you want and is more clear. –  msw Jun 17 '10 at 15:35

8 Answers 8

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can get bash to run a function by putting the command into bash's StdIn:

bash$ find ./ -name *.ogv -exec echo myfile {} \; | bash

The command above will work for your example but you need to take note of the fact that all of the 'myfile...' commands are generated at once and sent to a single bash process.

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This also looks good. It worked in my case as expected. Thank you. –  sharrajesh Jun 16 '10 at 23:38
$ cat functions.bash
#!/bin/bash

function myecho { echo "$@"; }
function myfile { file "$@"; }
function mycat { cat "$@"; }

myname=`basename $0`
eval ${myname} "$@"
$ ln functions.bash mycat
$ ./mycat /etc/motd
Linux tallguy 2.6.32-22-core2 ...
$ ln functions.bash myfile
$ myfile myfile
myfile: Bourne-Again shell script text executable
$ ln functions.bash myecho
$ myecho does this do what you want\?
does this do what you want?
$ 

where, of course, the functions can be a tad more complex than my examples.

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+1, elegant solution :) –  João Portela Jun 17 '10 at 13:00
find ./ -name *.ogv -exec bash -c 'myfile {}' \;
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1  
You should probably quote the filename: bash -c 'myfile "{}"'. –  Janus Jul 20 '11 at 2:05
    
Pretty sure that bash command won't expand the variable as you have it. I think it should be bash -c 'myfile "$0"' {} \; –  JellicleCat Aug 12 at 18:41

I managed to run it perhaps more elegantly as:

function myfile { ... }
export -f myfile
find -name out.ogv -exec bash -c '"$@"' myfile myfile '{}' \;

Notice that myfile is given twice. The first one is the $0 parameter of the script (and in this case it can be basically anything). The second one is the name of the function to run.

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I don't think find can do this, since it's the find command itself that's executing the command, and not the shell you're currently running...so bash functions or aliases won't work there. If you take your function definition and turn it into a separate bash script called myfile, make it executable, and install it on your path somewhere, find should do the right thing with it.

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even simpiler

function myfile { ... }
export -f myfile

find . -type f -exec bash -c 'myfile "{}"'  \;
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This works really well, thank you! What does the export "-f" do? As soon as I added it after my function, it worked! Before I only had "export myfile" –  Benxamin Jun 5 '13 at 22:20
1  
the -f means to export the item as a function instead of as a variable –  kdubs Jun 7 '13 at 1:56

Child shell scripts seems to keep the parent functions so you could do a script similar to this one:

'runit.sh'

#! /bin/bash

"$@"

then do find -name out.ogv -exec ./runit.sh myfile '{}' \; and it works! :)

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Thanks Joao. This looks like very clever and elegant solution. Little issue was that I had to source my script first to run myfile function e.g. I borrowed from your suggestion and made my runint.sh as follows #!/bin/bash script_name=$1 func_name=$2 func_arg=$3 source $script_name $func_name $func_arg $ find ./ -name *.ogv -exec ./runit.sh ~/.bashrc myfile {} \; ./out.ogv: Ogg data, Skeleton v3.0 Otherwise I was getting $ find ./ -name *.ogv -exec ./runit.sh myfile {} \; ./runit.sh: 1: myfile: not found Any thanks a lot. –  sharrajesh Jun 16 '10 at 23:31
    
Rather than sourcing the script from runit.sh, you can have the script export the function (export -f myfile) before using it. –  Gordon Davisson Jun 18 '10 at 18:14
    
I assumed he was doing it in his .bashrc. Thats why it should have worked, right? –  João Portela Jun 19 '10 at 14:03

Thanks Joao. This looks like very clever and elegant solution. Little issue was that I had to source my script first to run myfile function e.g. I borrowed from your suggestion and made my runint.sh as follows

#!/bin/bash
script_name=$1
func_name=$2
func_arg=$3
source $script_name
$func_name $func_arg

Now I can run it as follows

$ find ./ -name *.ogv -exec ./runit.sh ~/.bashrc myfile {} \;
./out.ogv: Ogg data, Skeleton v3.0

Otherwise I was getting

$ find ./ -name *.ogv -exec ./runit.sh myfile {} \;
./runit.sh: 1: myfile: not found

Anyway thanks a lot.

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