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The R language has a nifty feature for defining functions that can take a variable number of arguments. For example, the function data.frame takes any number of arguments, and each argument becomes the data for a column in the resulting data table. Example usage:

> data.frame(letters=c("a", "b", "c"), numbers=c(1,2,3), notes=c("do", "re", "mi"))
  letters numbers notes
1       a       1    do
2       b       2    re
3       c       3    mi

The function's signature includes an ellipsis, like this:

function (..., row.names = NULL, check.rows = FALSE, check.names = TRUE, 
    stringsAsFactors = default.stringsAsFactors()) 
{
    [FUNCTION DEFINITION HERE]
}

I would like to write a function that does something similar, taking multiple values and consolidating them into a single return value (as well as doing some other processing). In order to do this, I need to figure out how to "unpack" the ... from the function's arguments within the function. I don't know how to do this. The relevant line in the function definition of data.frame is object <- as.list(substitute(list(...)))[-1L], which I can't make any sense of.

So how can I convert the ellipsis from the function's signature into, for example, a list?

To be more specific, how can I write get_list_from_ellipsis in the code below?

my_ellipsis_function(...) {
    input_list <- get_list_from_ellipsis(...)
    output_list <- lapply(X=input_list, FUN=do_something_interesting)
    return(output_list)
}

my_ellipsis_function(a=1:10,b=11:20,c=21:30)

Edit

It seems there are two possible ways to do this. They are as.list(substitute(list(...)))[-1L] and list(...). However, these two do not do exactly the same thing. (For differences, see examples in the answers.) Can anyone tell me what the practical difference between them is, and which one I should use?

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this stream seems like a book in itself.. Awsum :) –  JstRoRR Apr 24 at 9:40

5 Answers 5

up vote 40 down vote accepted

I read answers and comments and I see that few things weren't mentioned:

  1. data.frame uses list(...) version. Fragment of the code:

    object <- as.list(substitute(list(...)))[-1L]
    mrn <- is.null(row.names)
    x <- list(...)
    

    object is used to do some magic with column names, but x is used to create final data.frame.
    For use of unevaluated ... argument look at write.csv code where match.call is used.

  2. As you write in comment result in Dirk answer is not a list of lists. Is a list of length 4, which elements are language type. First object is a symbol - list, second is expression 1:10 and so on. That explain why [-1L] is needed: it removes expected symbol from provided arguments in ... (cause it is always a list).
    As Dirk states substitute returns "parse tree the unevaluated expression".
    When you call my_ellipsis_function(a=1:10,b=11:20,c=21:30) then ... "creates" a list of arguments: list(a=1:10,b=11:20,c=21:30) and substitute make it a list of four elements:

    List of 4
    $  : symbol list
    $ a: language 1:10
    $ b: language 11:20
    $ c: language 21:30
    

    First element doesn't have a name and this is [[1]] in Dirk answer. I achieve this results using:

    my_ellipsis_function <- function(...) {
      input_list <- as.list(substitute(list(...)))
      str(input_list)
      NULL
    }
    my_ellipsis_function(a=1:10,b=11:20,c=21:30)
    
  3. As above we can use str to check what objects are in a function.

    my_ellipsis_function <- function(...) {
        input_list <- list(...)
        output_list <- lapply(X=input_list, function(x) {str(x);summary(x)})
        return(output_list)
    }
    my_ellipsis_function(a=1:10,b=11:20,c=21:30)
     int [1:10] 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
     int [1:10] 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
     int [1:10] 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
    $a
       Min. 1st Qu.  Median    Mean 3rd Qu.    Max. 
       1.00    3.25    5.50    5.50    7.75   10.00 
    $b
       Min. 1st Qu.  Median    Mean 3rd Qu.    Max. 
       11.0    13.2    15.5    15.5    17.8    20.0 
    $c
       Min. 1st Qu.  Median    Mean 3rd Qu.    Max. 
       21.0    23.2    25.5    25.5    27.8    30.0 
    

    It's ok. Lets see substitute version:

       my_ellipsis_function <- function(...) {
           input_list <- as.list(substitute(list(...)))
           output_list <- lapply(X=input_list, function(x) {str(x);summary(x)})
           return(output_list)
       }
       my_ellipsis_function(a=1:10,b=11:20,c=21:30)
        symbol list
        language 1:10
        language 11:20
        language 21:30
       [[1]]
       Length  Class   Mode 
            1   name   name 
       $a
       Length  Class   Mode 
            3   call   call 
       $b
       Length  Class   Mode 
            3   call   call 
       $c
       Length  Class   Mode 
            3   call   call 
    

    Isn't what we needed. You will need additional tricks to deal with these kind of objects (as in write.csv).

If you want use ... then you should use it as in Shane answer, by list(...).

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1  
+1 Fantastic discussion of the issues. –  Shane Jun 21 '10 at 15:51
    
Thank you for explaining the differences. –  Ryan Thompson Jun 21 '10 at 15:55
    
Great explanation, thanks! –  Ricardo Saporta Nov 13 '12 at 17:45

You can convert the ellipsis into a list with list(), and then perform your operations on it:

> test.func <- function(...) { lapply(list(...), class) }
> test.func(a="b", b=1)
$a
[1] "character"

$b
[1] "numeric"

So your get_list_from_ellipsis function is nothing more than list.

A valid use case for this is in cases where you want to pass in an unknown number of objects for operation (as in your example of c() or data.frame()). It's not a good idea to use the ... when you know each parameter in advance, however, as it adds some ambiguity and further complication to the argument string (and makes the function signature unclear to any other user). The argument list is an important piece of documentation for function users.

Otherwise, it is also useful for cases when you want to pass through parameters to a subfunction without exposing them all in your own function arguments. This can be noted in the function documentation.

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I know about using the ellipsis as a pass-through for arguments to subfunctions, but it is also common practice among R primitives to use the ellipsis in the way I have described. In fact, both the list and c functions work in this way, but both are primitives, so I can't easily inspect their source code to understand how they work. –  Ryan Thompson Jun 16 '10 at 22:07
1  
Ok, well using list() does exactly what you want, right? –  Shane Jun 17 '10 at 0:08
    
rbind.data.frame use this way. –  Marek Jun 17 '10 at 23:06
1  
If list(...) is sufficient, why do R builtins such as data.frame use the longer form as.list(substitute(list(...)))[-1L] instead? –  Ryan Thompson Jun 18 '10 at 0:29
    
As I didn't create data.frame, I don't know the answer to that (that said, I'm sure that there is a good reason for it). I use list() for this purpose in my own packages and have yet to encounter a problem with it. –  Shane Jun 18 '10 at 13:03

Just to add to Shane and Dirk's responses: it is interesting to compare

get_list_from_ellipsis1 <- function(...) list(...)
get_list_from_ellipsis1(a = 1:10, b = 2:20)

$a
 [1]  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10

$b
 [1]  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

with

get_list_from_ellipsis2 <- function(...) as.list(substitute(list(...)))[-1L]
get_list_from_ellipsis2(a = 1:10, b = 2:20)

$a
1:10

$b
2:20

As it stands, either version appears suitable for your purposes in my_ellipsis_function, though the first is clearly simpler.

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You gave half the answer already. Consider

R> my_ellipsis_function <- function(...) {
+   input_list <- as.list(substitute(list(...)))
+ }
R> print(my_ellipsis_function(a=1:10, b=2:20))
[[1]]
list

$a
1:10

$b
11:20

R> 

So this took two arguments a and b from the call and converted it to a list. Wasn't that what you asked for?

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Not quite what I want. That actually appears to return a list of lists. Notice the [[1]]. Also, I'd like to know how the magic incantation as.list(substitute(list(...))) works. –  Ryan Thompson Jun 16 '10 at 22:05
2  
The inner list(...) creates a list object based on the arguments. Then substitute() creates the parse tree for the unevaluated expression; see the help for this function. As well as a good advanced text on R (or S). This is not trivial stuff. –  Dirk Eddelbuettel Jun 16 '10 at 22:23
    
Ok, what about the [[-1L]] part (from my question)? Shouldn't it be [[1]]? –  Ryan Thompson Jun 16 '10 at 22:57
2  
You need to read up on indexing. The minus means 'exclude', i.e. print(c(1:3)[-1]) will print 2 and 3 only. The L is a new-fangled way to ensure it ends up as a integer, this is done a lot in the R sources. –  Dirk Eddelbuettel Jun 16 '10 at 23:24
1  
I don't need to read up on indexing, but I do need to pay closer attention to the output of the commands that you show. The difference between the [[1]] and the $a indices made me think that nested lists were involved. But now I see that what you actually get is the list I want, but with an extra element at the front. So then the [-1L] makes sense. Where does that extra first element come from, anyway? And is there any reason I should use this instead of simply list(...)? –  Ryan Thompson Jun 18 '10 at 0:50

This works as expected. The following is an interactive session:

> talk <- function(func, msg, ...){
+     func(msg, ...);
+ }
> talk(cat, c("this", "is", "a","message."), sep=":")
this:is:a:message.
> 

Same, except with a default argument:

> talk <- function(func, msg=c("Hello","World!"), ...){
+     func(msg, ...);
+ }
> talk(cat,sep=":")
Hello:World!
> talk(cat,sep=",", fill=1)
Hello,
World!
>

As you can see, you can use this to pass 'extra' arguments to a function within your function if the defaults are not what you want in a particular case.

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