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How do you reverse a string in Ruby? I know about string#reverse. I'm interested in understanding how to write it in Ruby from scratch, preferably an in-place solution.

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3  
this is will be way slower than string#reverse btw. –  Rishav Rastogi Jun 16 '10 at 23:56
1  
@Rishav, how do you know this to be the case. What do you think is happening with the reverse? –  VoodooChild Jun 16 '10 at 23:59
    
@VoodooChild ruby-doc.org/ruby-1.9/classes/String.src/M000609.html - It's very unlikely that Ruby will be able to compete with C in the speed category. –  x1a4 Jun 17 '10 at 0:16
    
@VoodooChild string#reverse internals use C to calculate the reverse. –  Rishav Rastogi Jun 17 '10 at 0:17
    
By "in-place solution" do you mean the equivalent of string#reverse!? A function that modifies the string directly rather than a duplicate? –  PreciousBodilyFluids Jun 17 '10 at 0:23

13 Answers 13

There's already an inplace reverse method, called "reverse!":

$ a = "abc"
$ a.reverse!
$ puts a
cba

If you want to do this manually try this (but it will probably not be multibyte-safe, eg UTF-8), and it will be slower:

class String
  def reverse_inplace!
    half_length = self.length / 2
    half_length.times {|i| self[i], self[-i-1] = self[-i-1], self[i] }
  end
end

This swaps every byte from the beginning with every byte from the end until both indexes meet at the center:

$ a = "abcd"
$ a.reverse_inplace!
$ puts a
dcba
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2  
It should be multibyte safe in versions of Ruby where the normal replace is, shouldn't it? –  Chuck Jun 17 '10 at 2:54
    
Not sure, the linked C source above isn't (at least not the loop). I don't know what the "single_byte_optimizable" does... BTW: The ruby version isn't multibyte safe. I just tried... –  hurikhan77 Jun 17 '10 at 5:48
    
1.9.2 should be multibyte safe. 1.8 versions will probably not be. –  the Tin Man Dec 30 '10 at 23:58
    
"This swaps every byte from the beginning with every byte from the end until both indexes meet at the center" - pre-1.9.2 that would be true, as Ruby considered characters to be equivalent to bytes. In 1.9+ they could be multiple bytes but still be a single character. –  the Tin Man Dec 31 '10 at 2:20

Just for discussion, with that many alternates, it is good to see if there are major differences in speed/efficiency. I cleaned up the code a bit as the code showing output was repeatedly reversing the outputs.

# encoding: utf-8

require "benchmark"

reverse_proc = Proc.new { |reverse_me| reverse_me.chars.inject([]){|r,c| r.unshift c}.join }

class String
  def reverse # !> method redefined; discarding old reverse
    each_char.to_a.reverse.join
  end

  def reverse! # !> method redefined; discarding old reverse!
    replace reverse
  end

  def reverse_inplace!
    half_length = self.length / 2
    half_length.times {|i| self[i], self[-i-1] = self[-i-1], self[i] }
  end

end

def reverse(a)
  (0...(a.length/2)).each {|i| a[i], a[a.length-i-1]=a[a.length-i-1], a[i]}
  return a
end

def reverse_string(string) # method reverse_string with parameter 'string'
  loop = string.length       # int loop is equal to the string's length
  word = ''                  # this is what we will use to output the reversed word
  while loop > 0             # while loop is greater than 0, subtract loop by 1 and add the string's index of loop to 'word'
    loop -= 1                  # subtract 1 from loop
    word += string[loop]       # add the index with the int loop to word
  end                        # end while loop
  return word                # return the reversed word
end                        # end the method

lorum = <<EOT
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Praesent quis magna eu
lacus pulvinar vestibulum ut ac ante. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur
adipiscing elit. Suspendisse et pretium orci. Phasellus congue iaculis
sollicitudin. Morbi in sapien mi, eget faucibus ipsum. Praesent pulvinar nibh
vitae sapien congue scelerisque. Aliquam sed aliquet velit. Praesent vulputate
facilisis dolor id ultricies. Phasellus ipsum justo, eleifend vel pretium nec,
pulvinar a justo. Phasellus erat velit, porta sit amet molestie non,
pellentesque a urna. Etiam at arcu lorem, non gravida leo. Suspendisse eu leo
nibh. Mauris ut diam eu lorem fringilla commodo. Aliquam at augue velit, id
viverra nunc.
EOT

And the results:

RUBY_VERSION # => "1.9.2"

name = "Marc-André"; reverse_proc.call(name) # => "érdnA-craM"
name = "Marc-André"; name.reverse! # => "érdnA-craM"
name = "Marc-André"; name.chars.inject([]){|s, c| s.unshift(c)}.join # => "érdnA-craM"
name = "Marc-André"; name.reverse_inplace!; name # => "érdnA-craM"
name = "Marc-André"; reverse(name) # => "érdnA-craM"
name = "Marc-André"; reverse_string(name) # => "érdnA-craM"

n = 5_000
Benchmark.bm(7) do |x|
  x.report("1:") { n.times do; reverse_proc.call(lorum); end }
  x.report("2:") { n.times do; lorum.reverse!; end }
  x.report("3:") { n.times do; lorum.chars.inject([]){|s, c| s.unshift(c)}.join; end }
  x.report("4:") { n.times do; lorum.reverse_inplace!; end }
  x.report("5:") { n.times do; reverse(lorum); end }
  x.report("6:") { n.times do; reverse_string(lorum); end }
end

# >>              user     system      total        real
# >> 1:       4.540000   0.000000   4.540000 (  4.539138)
# >> 2:       2.080000   0.010000   2.090000 (  2.084456)
# >> 3:       4.530000   0.010000   4.540000 (  4.532124)
# >> 4:       7.010000   0.000000   7.010000 (  7.015833)
# >> 5:       5.660000   0.010000   5.670000 (  5.665812)
# >> 6:       3.990000   0.030000   4.020000 (  4.021468)

It's interesting to me that the "C" version ("reverse_string()") is the fastest pure-Ruby version. #2 ("reverse!") is fastest but it's taking advantage of the [].reverse, which is in C.

  • Edit by Marc-André Lafortune *

Adding an extra test case (7):

def alt_reverse(string)
  word = ""
  chars = string.each_char.to_a
  chars.size.times{word << chars.pop}
  word
end

If the string is longer (lorum *= 10, n/=10), we can see that the difference widens because some functions are in O(n^2) while others (mine :-) are O(n):

             user     system      total        real
1:      10.500000   0.030000  10.530000 ( 10.524751)
2:       0.960000   0.000000   0.960000 (  0.954972)
3:      10.630000   0.080000  10.710000 ( 10.721388)
4:       6.210000   0.060000   6.270000 (  6.277207)
5:       4.210000   0.070000   4.280000 (  4.268857)
6:      10.470000   3.540000  14.010000 ( 15.012420)
7:       1.600000   0.010000   1.610000 (  1.601219)
share|improve this answer
    
Nice test. Do lorum *= 10, n /= 10 and the results will show you that any solution using [] is not of the right order (i.e. O(n^2)) instead of O(n) for solutions with each_char. Also, using += like #6 also gives you #6. I edited my answer with another solution not using reverse. –  Marc-André Lafortune Dec 31 '10 at 16:47
    
I meant "also gives you O(n^2)" –  Marc-André Lafortune Dec 31 '10 at 16:54
    
@Marc-André Lafortune, Good points. Feel free to edit and append the tests with your changes since you've got the reputation. :-) –  the Tin Man Dec 31 '10 at 18:59

Here's one way to do it with inject and unshift:

"Hello world".chars.inject([]){|s, c| s.unshift(c)}.join
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Note that using unshift makes your solution O(n^2). See my solutions for O(n). –  Marc-André Lafortune Dec 31 '10 at 16:57

The Ruby equivalent of the builtin reverse could look like:

# encoding: utf-8

class String
  def reverse
    each_char.to_a.reverse.join
  end

  def reverse!
    replace reverse
  end
end

str = "Marc-André"
str.reverse!
str # => "érdnA-craM"
str.reverse # => "Marc-André"

Note: this assumes Ruby 1.9, or else require "backports" and set $KCODE for UTF-8.

For a solution not involving reverse, one could do:

def alt_reverse(string)
  word = ""
  chars = string.each_char.to_a
  chars.size.times{word << chars.pop}
  word
end                        

Note: any solution using [] to access individual letters will be of order O(n^2); to access the 1000th letter, Ruby must go through the first 999 one by one to check for multibyte characters. It is thus important to use an iterator like each_char for a solution in O(n).

Another thing to avoid is to build intermediate values of increasing length; using += instead of << in alt_reverse would also make the solution O(n^2) instead of O(n).

Building an array with unshift will also make the solution O(n^2), because it implies recopying all existing elements one index higher each time one does an unshift.

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Use

def reverse_string(string) # Method reverse_string with parameter 'string'.
  loop = string.length # int loop is equal to the string's length.
  word = '' # This is what we will use to output the reversed word.
  while loop > 0 # while loop is greater than 0, subtract loop by 1 and add the string's index of loop to 'word'.
    loop -= 1 # Subtract 1 from loop.
    word += string[loop] # Add the index with the int loop to word.
  end # End while loop.
  return word # Return the reversed word.
end # End the method.
share|improve this answer
6  
Looks like it was written by someone who knew more C than Ruby... –  Marc-André Lafortune Jun 17 '10 at 3:15
    
Downvoting because this is writing C in Ruby. –  Andrew Grimm May 13 '11 at 0:16
1  
thanks for the feedback. I decided to leave this answer as posted just incase anyone is interested. –  VoodooChild May 13 '11 at 18:56
str = "something"
reverse = ""
str.length.times do |i|
  reverse.insert(i, str[-1-i].chr)
end
share|improve this answer

Also, using Procs ...

Proc.new {|reverse_me| reverse_me.chars.inject([]){|r,c| r.unshift c}.join}.call("The house is blue")

=> "eulb si esuoh ehT"

Proc.new would be handy here because you could then nest your reversing algorithm (and still keep things on one line). This would be handy if, for instance, you needed to reverse each word in an already-reversed sentence:

# Define your reversing algorithm
reverser = Proc.new{|rev_me| rev_me.chars.inject([]){r,c| r.unshift c}.join}

# Run it twice - first on the entire sentence, then on each word
reverser.call("The house is blue").split.map {|w| reverser.call(w)}.join(' ')

=> "blue is house The"
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Consider looking at how Rubinius implements the method - they implement much of the core library in Ruby itself, and I wouldn't be surprised if String#reverse and String#reverse! is implemented in Ruby.

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Hard to read one-liner,

def reverse(a)
    (0...(a.length/2)).each {|i| a[i], a[a.length-i-1]=a[a.length-i-1], a[i]}
    return a
end
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1  
Ouch, my eyes... –  Ed S. Jun 17 '10 at 0:30
    
Not multibyte aware... BTW, the two last a.length can be removed –  Marc-André Lafortune Jun 17 '10 at 3:18
    
he didn't ask for pretty code, guys—this doesn't deserve a -1. –  Aaron Yodaiken Jun 17 '10 at 3:40
    
@Marc-André Lafortune, please explain why it is not multi-byte aware. It uses all multibyte-sensitive calls. –  the Tin Man Dec 31 '10 at 3:37
    
@the Tin Man: I meant it is not multibyte aware in Ruby 1.8: with $KCODE = "U", any multi-byte character will not reverse properly. In Ruby 1.9 it works fine. –  Marc-André Lafortune Dec 31 '10 at 5:28

Here's an alternative using the xor bitwise operations:

class String

  def xor_reverse
    len = self.length - 1
    count = 0

    while (count < len)
      self[count] ^= self[len]
      self[len] ^= self[count]
      self[count] ^= self[len]

      count += 1
      len -= 1
    end

  self
end

"foobar".xor_reverse
=> raboof
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btw, this won't work in 1.9 since the behavior of "a"[0] changed. –  patrick May 26 '11 at 18:54

In Ruby:

name = "Hello World"; reverse_proc.call(name) 

name = "Hello World"; name.reverse! 

name = "Hello World"; name.chars.inject([]){|s, c| s.unshift(c)}.join 

name = "Hello World"; name.reverse_inplace!; 

name = "Hello World"; reverse(name) 

name = "Hello World"; reverse_string(name) 
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I believe this would work also

def reverse(str)
  string = ''
   (0..str.size-1).each do |i|
    string << str[str.size - 1 - i]
   end
  string
end
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Wild or educated guess? –  Bernard Saucier Feb 13 at 12:57
    
Sorry thanks for pointing out my mistake, I've now corrected it –  SimplyJhay Mar 31 at 8:59
def palindrome(string)

  s = string.gsub(/\W+/,'').downcase

  t = s.chars.inject([]){|a,b| a.unshift(b)}.join

  return true if(s == t)

  false

end
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