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Is it time to start using HTML5?

We are just starting out with a project and do not know how to work with the possibilities around HTML 5. But we are hearing a lot of people starting to talk about it. Any advise would be much appreciated.

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marked as duplicate by Dean Harding, Reed Copsey, Robusto, artlung, Greg Hewgill Jun 18 '10 at 1:54

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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This has been asked many times (e.g. Is it time to start using HTML5?). The basic consensus is that while you can probably use parts of HTML5 (with fallbacks for certain browsers maybe) you can't use all of it just yet... –  Dean Harding Jun 17 '10 at 1:37
    
codeka, that comment should be an answer. :) –  Jeremy Visser Jun 17 '10 at 4:32

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One thing you need to realize is that you're severely limiting your market if you do so. Sure, all newer browsers (FireFox 3.5+, newer Chrome versions, newer Safari and Opera versions, IE 9) will support it, but they make up a very small portion of the internet right now. Considering that IE still dominates, if you want a wide audience you'll need to do one of two things: Not use HTML5, or implement the site twice (HTML5 and some other tech like Flash).

But it all depends on your market. If you're targeting geeks, chances are pretty good that most of them will have an HTML5 enabled browser. If you're targeting business people, chances are pretty good that they won't (considering many companies rely on IE).

So it's not an easy answer. As time goes on, the adoption will only increase... So while it may be "cool" to be an early adopter, it may not make business sense (depending on intended audience)...

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Thanks a lot man. Really really appreciate you taking the time to answer it so lucidly. –  Manu Jun 17 '10 at 1:41
    
“Considering that IE still dominates, if you want a wide audience you'll need to do one of two things: Not use HTML5, or implement the site twice (HTML5 and some other tech like Flash).” — That depends which part of HTML5 you’re using. You can switch to the HTML5 doctype immediately, for example, and you can use JavaScript to enable/emulate the new structural elements like <section> and the new form features. It sounds like you’re talking about <canvas>, which can just about be emulated in IE using JavaScript — see explorercanvas. –  Paul D. Waite Jun 17 '10 at 13:45
    
@Paul D. Waite, yes you are correct. You can emulate at least some of the new behaviors with JS/CSS. However the point is that it's bloody slow to emulate the application tags (like <canvas>). If you're building a full blown application (which it sounds like the OP was), it's not going to be fast enough (IMHO at least, based on my testing) for anything remotely complex. –  ircmaxell Jun 17 '10 at 13:54
    
“it's bloody slow to emulate the application tags (like <canvas>)” Very true — as far as <canvas> goes, your answer is dead on. There’s just a lot more to HTML5 than <canvas> alone. –  Paul D. Waite Jun 17 '10 at 14:51
    
Quite true and that's a valid point. Are there any compatibility layers that exist to "backport" the rest of 5 into a non-5 browser (or implement missing pieces) so people don't need to experiment and hack one together themselves? –  ircmaxell Jun 17 '10 at 15:51

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