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Lets say you have a property like:

Person person1;


public Person Captin{
    get{
        return person1;
    }
    set{
        person1 = value;
    }
}

public void SomeFunction(){
    Captin.name = "Hook"
}

In this case if you set the name on the property we know that the new name of Hook will get applied to the underlying value of person1. What if our implementation were a little different say:

public Person Captin{
    get{
        return ReadCaptinFromDisk();
    }
    set{
        WriteCaptinToDisk(value);
    }
}

public void SomeFunction(){
    Captin.name = "Hook"
}

In this case for the underlying value to get set properly we need to have the Captin's set code called as part of the assignment to Captin.name.

I am interested in knowing if the parameter set code will call the set on assignments of field or method calls on property references. especially for this kind of situation where the value needs to be propagated to disk (etc.).

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we know that the new name of Hook will get applied to the underlying value of person1 Well, if the type Person is a class, then the getter will return a reference to the Person object. That object will then be mutated. The private field person1 is another reference to the same object. But if Person were a struct then the getter would return a value which would be a copy of the value of person1. Therefore even your first code wouldn't work in case Person was a value-type. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Nov 19 '12 at 14:26

4 Answers 4

Each time you access your property Captin it will read from disk. But if you change the property 'name' it will not write to disk. It will only write to disk if you do something like

public void SomeFunction() {
   Person p = Captin;
   p.name = "Hook";
   Captin = p;
}
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As @Joe notes it will not write to the disk. I just wanted to add that it is because you are only using the getter, not the setter. @Joe's example uses both.

In my opinion, this is both a really bad use of a getter and violates separation of concerns. You should have a data layer that handles persisting the data. The logic of this should not be in your business object.

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I am mostly interested in using cached copies of objects –  minty Nov 20 '08 at 16:52

A class-type variable, parameter, field, return value, or other such storage location should be thought of as holding an "object id". If some object Foo has a property called Bar of some class type which is backed by field _Bar, and _Bar holds "object id#24601", then the statement Foo.Bar.Text = "George" will call the Text setter on object #24601 with a value of "George". Note that this statement will not modify object Foo itself (its field _Bar will have held "object id#24601" before the statement executes, and will still hold it after); it will likely, however, affect object #24601.

A struct-type storage location should be thought of as holding the contents of all its fields (both public and private). If Foo.Boz were a property of type Rectangle (which is a struct) and backing field _Boz, an access to Foo.Boz would create a new temporary instance of type Rectangle, all of whose fields would be copied from those of Foo._Boz. An attempt to read Foo.Boz.X would copy all the fields of _Boz to a temporary instance, and then access field X of that instance.

Note that some really old and evil C# compilers would interpret code like Foo.Boz.X = 5; as Rectangle temp; temp.X = 5;, discarding the resulting value of temp but not issuing any warning. Such compiler behavior caused some people to declare that structs should be "immutable" to ensure that such code will generate a compiler error rather than producing bogus behavior. Unfortunately, that belief persists to this day despite the fact that any decent compiler would forbid such code even if X was a mutable field.

Note that the proper idiomatic way to update a property of a mutable struct type is:

  Rectangle temp = MyListOFRectangles[5];
  temp.X = 5;
  MyListOFRectangles[5] = temp;

If Rectangle is known to have a public integer field named X, and MyListOfRectangles is a List<Rectangle>, one doesn't need to know about any of any of Rectangle's other properties, constructors, etc. to know that the above code will change MyListOfRectangles[5].X but not affect any other property of MyListOfRectangles[5], nor any property of MyListOfRectangles[4]. Nice, clear, and easy. Exposed-field structs allow piece-wise editing of values in a manner which is clear and consistent, unlike any other kind of data type.

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Upvoted. So you believe it's OK to write mutable structs (given that the compiler will know it can't mutate the immediate result of a method call, as in GetSomeStructValue().Name = "Hook"; which won't compile)? –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Nov 19 '12 at 14:33

The property's setter will only be called when someone actually assigns to it directly.

As for whether your code is okay or not: it's a matter of documentation.

Whenever you have a property which returns something mutable, you ought to indicate whether what mutations to it will do. Are you returning a copy of your "real" data, or is it the real data itself? This comes up very often when a property (or normal method) returns a collection of some kind - it is mutable? What will happen if I change it?

If you document your property explaining that the data returned is just a copy, and changes won't be reflected anywhere, that's fine. If you leave it ambiguous, that's when you'll get problems.

Immutability removes these concerns, of course...

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