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I'm trying to create a generic repository for my models. Currently i've 3 different models which have no relationship between them. (Contacts, Notes, Reminders).

class Repository<T> where T:class
{
    public IQueryable<T> SearchExact(string keyword)
    {
        //Is there a way i can make the below line generic
        //return db.ContactModels.Where(i => i.Name == keyword)        
        //I also tried db.GetTable<T>().Where(i => i.Name == keyword)
        //But the variable i doesn't have the Name property since it would know it only in the runtime
        //db also has a method ITable GetTable(Type modelType) but don't think if that would help me
    }
}

In MainViewModel, I call the Search method like this:

Repository<ContactModel> _contactRepository = new Repository<ContactModel>();

public void Search(string keyword)
{
    var filteredList = _contactRepository.SearchExact(keyword).ToList();
}

Solution:

Finally went with Ray's Dynamic Expression solution:

public IQueryable<TModel> SearchExact(string searchKeyword, string columnName)
{
    ParameterExpression param = Expression.Parameter(typeof(TModel), "i");
    Expression left = Expression.Property(param, typeof(TModel).GetProperty(columnName));
    Expression right = Expression.Constant(searchKeyword);
    Expression expr = Expression.Equal(left, right);
}

query = db.GetTable<TModel>().Where(Expression.Lambda<Func<TModel, bool>>(expr, param));
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Interface solution

If you can add an interface to your object you can use that. For example you could define:

 public interface IName
 {
   string Name { get; }
 }

Then your repository could be declared as:

class Repository<T> where T:class, IName
{
  public IQueryable<T> SearchExact(string keyword)  
  {  
    return db.GetTable<T>().Where(i => i.Name == keyword);
  }
}  

Alternate interface solution

Alternatively you could put the "where" on your SearchExact method by using a second generic parameter:

class Repository<T> where T:class
{  
  public IQueryable<T> SearchExact<U>(string keyword) where U: T,IName
  {  
    return db.GetTable<U>().Where(i => i.Name == keyword);
  }
}  

This allows the Repository class to be used with objects that don't implement IName, whereas the SearchExact method can only be used with objects that implement IName.

Reflection solution

If you can't add an IName-like interface to your objects, you can use reflection instead:

class Repository<T> where T:class
{
  static PropertyInfo _nameProperty = typeof(T).GetProperty("Name");

  public IQueryable<T> SearchExact(string keyword)
  {
    return db.GetTable<T>().Where(i => (string)_nameProperty.GetValue(i) == keyword);
  }
}

This is slower than using an interface, but sometimes it is the only way.

More notes on interface solution and why you might use it

In your comment you mention that you can't use an interface but don't explain why. You say "Nothing in common is present in the three models. So i think making an interface out of them is not possible." From your question I understood that all three models have a "Name" property. In that case, it is possible to implement an interface on all three. Just implement the interface as shown and ", IName" to each of your three class definitions. This will give you the best performance for both local queries and SQL generation.

Even if the properties in question are not all called "Name", you can still use the nterface solution by adding a "Name" property to each and having its getter and setter access the other property.

Expression solution

If the IName solution won't work and you need the SQL conversion to work, you can do this by building your LINQ query using Expressions. This more work and is significantly less efficient for local use but will convert to SQL well. The code would be something like this:

class Repository<T> where T:Class
{
  public IQueryable<T> SearchExact(string keyword,
                                   Expression<Func<T,string>> getNameExpression)
  {
    var param = Expression.Parameter(typeof(T), "i");
    return db.GetTable<T>().Where(
                Expression.Lambda<Func<T,bool>>(
                  Expression.Equal(
                    Expression.Invoke(
                      Expression.Constant(getNameExpression),
                      param),
                    Expression.Constant(keyword),
                  param));
  }
}

and it would be called thusly:

repository.SearchExact("Text To Find", i => i.Name)
share|improve this answer
    
Thinking laterally, I like it. Linq2Sql will mean that they will probably need to use some post processing to apply the interface to the classes. –  Spence Jun 17 '10 at 6:49
    
Second approach (putting constraint on method) seems better to me, but would probably then go on to rename the method SearchExactName. –  David_001 Jun 17 '10 at 6:51
    
@Spence - there are two ways of doing this; you can either use partial classes to add the : IName, or you can edit the DBML and set the global base-type for entities (if all your types should implement it). –  Marc Gravell Jun 17 '10 at 6:51
    
Yes, I sometimes used partial classes for this when I had to use Linq2Sql. –  Ray Burns Jun 17 '10 at 6:53
    
@Ray Burns: Thanks for the quick reply. Nothing in common is present in the three models. So i think making an interface out of them is not possible. Instead can i give the scope like this where U : T, ContactModel, NoteModel, ReminderModel to achieve what i want? I'm really weak in reflections. Can you explain that part also? –  Amsakanna Jun 17 '10 at 6:58

Ray's method is quite good, and if you have the ability to add an interface definitely the superior however if for some reason you are unable to add an interface to these classes (Part of a class library you can't edit or something) then you could also consider passing a Func in which could tell it how to get the name.

EG:

class Repository<T>
{  
  public IQueryable<T> SearchExact(string keyword, Func<T, string> getSearchField)  
  {  
    return db.GetTable<T>().Where(i => getSearchField(i) == keyword);
  }
}

You'd then have to call it as:

var filteredList = _contactRepository.SearchExact(keyword, cr => cr.Name).ToList();

Other than these two options you could always look into using reflection to access the Name property without any interface, but this has the downside that there's no compile-time check that makes sure the classes you're passing actually DO have a Name property and also has the side-effect that the LINQ will not be translated to SQL and the filtering will happen in .NET (Meaning the SQL server could get hit more than is needed).

You could also use a Dynamic LINQ query to achieve this SQL-side effect, but it has the same non type-safe issues listed above.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for using the alternative functional approach, rather than OO approach of Ray's solution. –  David_001 Jun 17 '10 at 6:58
    
@Tim Schneider: +1 That should be the solution. Let me confirm today. –  Amsakanna Jun 17 '10 at 7:13
    
Yes, Func is another good way to do it. Note that it has the same disadvantage as reflection does in terms of translation: Because getSearchField is already a delegate (a pointer to actual machine code), LINQ2SQL has no way of parsing it, so again the filtering will happen in .NET. The interface approach will successfully translate to SQL, but to get this to translate you must arrange to pass in an Expression, but this will make local execution slower. –  Ray Burns Jun 17 '10 at 7:20
    
@Ray Burns/@Tim: one thing i'm very sure is that i need the translation to SQL. I want to query the db and hence i need to return a IQueryable<T>. I call up the enumerator by invoking the dispatcher and populating my listview asynchronously. Which solution would then work for me? –  Amsakanna Jun 17 '10 at 8:10
    
I added several paragraphs and one more solution to my answer to help answer this. I explain that the interface solution doesn't seem incompatible with anything you have said so far, and also give a new Expression solution that is much less efficient and more code, but will work if the interface solution is actually infeasible. –  Ray Burns Jun 17 '10 at 10:33

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