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To my surprise this code works fine:

int i = 2;
switch(i) {
case 1:
    String myString = "foo";
    break;
case 2:
    myString = "poo";
    System.out.println(myString);
}

But the String reference should never be declared? Could it be that all variables under every case always are declared no matter what, or how is this resolved?

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1  
Aren't all the declarations done at the beginning of the {...} block containing them ? –  Jules Olléon Jun 17 '10 at 8:00
    
I think Jules is right. Java has static scopes so control flow does not influence the creation (as opposed to initialization) of the variable. The place on the stack is allocated upon entering the switch block. But it still is kind of curios. GCC refuses to compile equivalent C code for the (I think) same reason Java refuses to compile if(someBool) String s = "foo"; –  musiKk Jun 17 '10 at 8:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Well, it's about brackets (i.e. scope).

It's better practice, arguably, to write your statements like so:

int i = 2;
switch(i) {
    case 1: {
        String myString = "foo";
        break;
    }
    case 2: {
        myString = "poo";
        System.out.println(myString);
    }
}

(I'm not near a Java compiler right now, but that shouldn't compile).

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I learned something new today! –  Abhinav Sarkar Jun 17 '10 at 8:04
2  
Indeed it doesn't compile. –  musiKk Jun 17 '10 at 8:06
    
@musikk: Thanks for confirming, it's not often I'm happy that something doesn't compile :) –  Noon Silk Jun 17 '10 at 8:07
    
It's interesting... you don't think about it much, but you can further limit the scope of certain variables arbitrarily by using braces... –  Tim Bender Jun 17 '10 at 8:47

The scope of the myString declaration is the switch block (where the { character is). If you were to write it like this, the declaration would be per-case:

int i = 2;
switch(i) {
    case 1: {
        String myString = "foo";
        break;
    }

    case 2: {
        String myString = "poo";
        System.out.println(myString);
    }
}
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