Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a piece of code which I am doubting it as a implementation of recursion by its definition. My understanding is that the code must call itself, the exact same function. I also question whether writing the code this way adds additional overhead which can be seen with the use of recursion. What are your thoughts?

class dhObject
{
public:
   dhObject** children;
   int numChildren;
   GLdouble linkLength; //ai 
   GLdouble theta; //angle of rot about the z axis
   GLdouble twist; //about the x axis
   GLdouble displacement; // displacement from the end point of prev along z
   GLdouble thetaMax;
   GLdouble thetaMin;
   GLdouble thetaInc;
   GLdouble direction;

   dhObject(ifstream &fin)
   {
      fin >> numChildren >> linkLength >> theta >> twist >> displacement >> thetaMax >> thetaMin;
      //std::cout << numChildren << std::endl;
      direction = 1;
      thetaInc = 1.0;
      if (numChildren > 0)
      {
         children = new dhObject*[numChildren];
         for(int i = 0; i < numChildren; ++i)
         {
            children[i] = new dhObject(fin);
         }
      }
   }

   void traverse(void)
   {
      glPushMatrix();
      //draw move initial and draw
      transform();
      draw();
      //draw children
      for(int i = 0; i < numChildren; ++i)
      {
         children[i]->traverse();
      }
      glPopMatrix();
   }

   void update(void)
   {
      //Update the animation, if it has finished all animation go backwards
      if (theta <= thetaMin)
      {
         thetaInc = 1.0;
      } else if (theta >= thetaMax)
      {
         thetaInc = -1.0;
      }
      theta += thetaInc;
      //std::cout << thetaMin << " " << theta << " " << thetaMax << std::endl;
      for(int i = 0; i < numChildren; ++i)
      {
         children[i]->update();
      }
   }

   void draw(void)
   {
      glPushMatrix();
      glColor3f (0.0f,0.0f,1.0f);
      glutSolidCube(0.1);
      glPopMatrix();
   }

   void transform(void)
   {
      //Move in the correct way, R, T, T, R
      glRotatef(theta, 0, 0, 1.0);
      glTranslatef(0,0,displacement);
      glTranslatef(linkLength, 0,0);
      glRotatef(twist, 1.0,0.0,0.0);
   }
};
share|improve this question
    
please check the indentation –  swegi Jun 17 '10 at 10:11
    
pls snip your code down to only the relevant parts in future –  danio Jun 17 '10 at 10:31

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Yes, since you have certain functions calling themselves. By definition that is direct recursion. You could also have indirect recursion if you had function A() calling function B(), function B() in turn (directly or indirectly) calling function A() again.

share|improve this answer
    
Are they really calling themselves though? –  IVlad Jun 17 '10 at 10:13
    
Where does he have functions calling themselves? He has another object that calls this function, but it is not this->callMyFuction(). –  Shaihi Jun 17 '10 at 10:14
    
In this case - yes, they are actually calling themselves, since this is of type dhObject*. –  sharptooth Jun 17 '10 at 10:14
1  
My C++ is not great, but even if the same exact function is called, it's called as part of a different object, so it doesn't really call itself as far as I can see. –  IVlad Jun 17 '10 at 10:17
6  
Every member function has an implicit this parameter. So although it is called as functionImpl( someOtherInstance, parameter ) instead of functionImpl( thisInstance, parameter ) is still calls itself, just the implicit parameter differs. –  sharptooth Jun 17 '10 at 10:21

This is a matter of definition/nitpicking. In this C function:

void traverse( tree * t ) {
    if ( t != 0 ) {
        traverse( t->right );
        traverse( t->left );
    }
}

Is the function recursive? I would say yes, even though it is being called on different objects. So I would say your code is also recursive. To take an even more extreme example:

unsigned int f( unsigned int n ) {
    if ( n = 0 ) {
       return 0; 
    }
    else {
       return f( n - 1 );   // XXX
    }
}

The thing the function is being called on at XXX is obviously not the same thing it was originally called on. But I think everyone would agree this is a recursive function.

share|improve this answer
    
for the definition of recursion it does not matter on which object the function is called or which parameters are passed. The only constraint is that you have to (directly or indirectly) call the same function again before you leave it. –  codymanix Jun 17 '10 at 10:30
    
I agree that your examples are recursive, but in my example, the functions exist in an entirely different object. Your example calls the exact same function, mine calls a function in a different object. Isn't the definition of recursive behaviour to call the exact same function? –  dekz Jun 17 '10 at 10:55
    
@dekz No they don't. In C++, functions belong to the class, not to objects. –  anon Jun 17 '10 at 10:56
    
@Neil, Oh I see, so the both functions are stored at the same memory adress? a->traverse() and b->traverse() would have the same memory address? If not then they semantically the same function? –  dekz Jun 17 '10 at 10:58
    
@dekz There is no "both" there is only one function "traverse" which exists at a single unique address. There are multiple calls to this function, but a function call is not a function. –  anon Jun 17 '10 at 11:02

Looks like recursion in the traverse() and update() methods with depth controlled by the physical geometry of your object collection.

If this is your actual class I would recommend a few things:

  1. Check the upper bound of numChildren before using it lest someone passes in a remarkably huge number by mistake.

  2. If this will be used in a threaded environment you might want to synchronize access to the child objects.

  3. Consider using containers instead of allocating an array. I don't see a destructor either so you'd leak the memory for the array storage and the children if this object gets deleted.

share|improve this answer
    
part of the object including the destructor was snipped as it wasn't relevant. –  dekz Jun 17 '10 at 11:08

If all you're worried about is the overhead of recursion then the important thing is to measure how deep your stack goes. It doesn't matter whether you're working recursively or not, if your stack is 100 calls deep.

share|improve this answer
    
It's about 4 total objects, each with 1-2 children. So I don't think there would be excessive overhead. Would you agree? –  dekz Jun 17 '10 at 11:07
    
Yes. The only problem with recursion is when you go really deep. –  Skilldrick Jun 17 '10 at 11:26

Calling one of these methods(traverse or update) will have the effect of calling that same method an every child. So, the methods are not recursive. Instead, it's a recursive algorithm: it is applied recursively on the logical tree of objects.

The depth of the call stack is directly determined by the structure of the data on which the algorithm operates.

What really happens is this(pseudo code):

Function Traverse(object o)
{
   [do something with o]

   Foreach(object child in o.Children)
       Traverse(child);

   [do something with o]
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.