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How can I check if a variable is empty in Shell?

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2  
Which kind of shell script? *nix? –  T.J. Crowder Jun 17 '10 at 11:03
6  
bash shell script –  Tree Jun 17 '10 at 11:59

7 Answers 7

up vote 151 down vote accepted

In bash at least:

if [[ -z "$var" ]]

the command man test is your friend.

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27  
double square brackets are useless here. it may be simple [ -z "$var" ] or even easier imho if test -z "var" .. anyway +1 :) –  Luca Borrione Aug 31 '12 at 20:15
1  
double square brackets are not useless, if I do not inlcude I ma getting ./test.ksh[8]: test: argument expected dunnot the reason but single bracket didn't work but the double one had it. –  gahlot.jaggs Oct 4 '13 at 7:24
2  
@LucaBorrione I think you mean if test -z "$var", right? –  neu242 Feb 20 at 7:28

Presuming bash:

var=""
if [ -n "$var" ]; then
    echo "not empty"
else
    echo "empty"
fi
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7  
The more direct answer is -z: [[ -z "$an_unset_or_empty_var" ]] && echo empty –  glenn jackman Jun 17 '10 at 12:02
    
@glenn jackman: good comment; it's true that -z is closer to what was asked. Jay has put this in his answer so I'll refrain from updating mine and leave this up as is. –  ChristopheD Jun 17 '10 at 19:10

I have also seen

if [ "x$variable" = "x" ]; then ...

which is obviously very robust and shell independent.

Also, there is a difference between "empty" and "unset". See How to tell if a string is not defined in a bash shell script?.

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if [ ${foo:+1} ]
then
    echo "yes"
fi

prints yes if the variable is set. ${foo:+1} will return 1 when the variable is set, otherwise it will return empty string.

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if [[ "$variable" == "" ]] ...
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[ "$variable" ] || echo empty
: ${variable="value_to_set_if_unset"}
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Great way to default out a var, plus 1 –  ehime Dec 10 '13 at 17:16

The question asks how to check if a variable is an empty string and the best answers are already given for that.
But I landed here after a period passed programming in php and what I was actually searching was a check like the empty function in php working in a bash shell.
After reading the answers I realized I was not thinking properly in bash, but anyhow in that moment a function like empty in php would have been soooo handy in my bash code.
As I think this can happen to others, I decided to convert the php empty function in bash

According to the php manual:
a variable is considered empty if it doesn't exist or if its value is one of the following:

  • "" (an empty string)
  • 0 (0 as an integer)
  • 0.0 (0 as a float)
  • "0" (0 as a string)
  • an empty array
  • a variable declared, but without a value

Of course the null and false cases cannot be converted in bash, so they are omitted.

function empty
{
    local var="$1"

    # Return true if:
    # 1.    var is a null string ("" as empty string)
    # 2.    a non set variable is passed
    # 3.    a declared variable or array but without a value is passed
    # 4.    an empty array is passed
    if test -z "$var"
    then
        [[ $( echo "1" ) ]]
        return

    # Return true if var is zero (0 as an integer or "0" as a string)
    elif [ "$var" == 0 2> /dev/null ]
    then
        [[ $( echo "1" ) ]]
        return

    # Return true if var is 0.0 (0 as a float)
    elif [ "$var" == 0.0 2> /dev/null ]
    then
        [[ $( echo "1" ) ]]
        return
    fi

    [[ $( echo "" ) ]]
}



Example of usage:

if empty "${var}"
    then
        echo "empty"
    else
        echo "not empty"
fi



Demo:
the following snippet:

#!/bin/bash

vars=(
    ""
    0
    0.0
    "0"
    1
    "string"
    " "
)

for (( i=0; i<${#vars[@]}; i++ ))
do
    var="${vars[$i]}"

    if empty "${var}"
        then
            what="empty"
        else
            what="not empty"
    fi
    echo "VAR \"$var\" is $what"
done

exit

outputs:

VAR "" is empty
VAR "0" is empty
VAR "0.0" is empty
VAR "0" is empty
VAR "1" is not empty
VAR "string" is not empty
VAR " " is not empty

Having said that in a bash logic the checks on zero in this function can cause side problems imho, anyone using this function should evaluate this risk and maybe decide to cut those checks off leaving only the first one.

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