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There is a bug in jQuery 1.4.2 that makes change event on select-element getting fired twice when using both DOM-event and a jQuery event, and this only on IE7/8. Here is the test code:

<html>

<head>
    <script src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery-1.4.2.js" type="text/javascript"></script>

    <script type="text/javascript">

       jQuery(document).ready(function() {

         jQuery(".myDropDown").change(function() {


         });

       });

    </script>

</head>

<body>
    <select class="myDropDown" onchange="alert('hello');">
          <option>1</option>
          <option>2</option>
          <option>3</option>
          <option>4</option>
        </select>
</body>

</html>

Update: Another view of the problem, actually this is the real problem we have with our application. Binding a live change event on a selector that isn't even touching the select-element with DOM-event also causes double firing.

<html>

<head>
    <script src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery-1.4.2.js" type="text/javascript"></script>

    <script type="text/javascript">

       jQuery(document).ready(function() {

         jQuery(".someSelectThatDoesNotExist").live("change", function() {


         });

       });

    </script>

</head>

<body>
    <select class="myDropDown" onchange="alert('hello');">
          <option>1</option>
          <option>2</option>
          <option>3</option>
          <option>4</option>
        </select>
</body>

</html>

Ticket to actual bug: http://dev.jquery.com/ticket/6593

This causes alot of trouble for us in our application cause we use both ASP.NET-events mixed with jQuery and once you hook up a change event on any element every select (dropdown) gets this double firing problem.

Is there anyone who knows a way around this in the meantime until this issue is fixed?

share|improve this question
    
Do you need the event to propagate? – Nick Craver Jun 17 '10 at 11:14
    
Unfortunately, if you need propagation behavior, etc...I don't think it's possible, this is a 1.4.2 core/IE8 bug that'll need an additional check in jQuery core to fix. – Nick Craver Jun 17 '10 at 11:40
    
@Nick: What do you mean by propagate? I want it to work like the other browsers, the event only firing once. – Marcus Jun 17 '10 at 12:26
    
@Marcus - Does the event need to bubble up, e.g. are you using .live() or .delegate() or any other bubble capture in a parent element? – Nick Craver Jun 17 '10 at 12:29
    
@Nick: The first thing I tried was using live/delegation instead of straightforward binding. The interesting thing is that it changes the order the events are fired, but it didn't fix the issue. I did manage one solution though. – Andy E Jun 17 '10 at 12:32
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I hate to raise this question from the dead but jquery finally fixed this bug in version 1.7 which was recently released.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice, thank you. Then you are the lucky one getting an answer checked :) – Marcus Nov 10 '11 at 13:28

I had a play around with the bug and there doesn't appear to be any obvious workaround. In my testing I found that the second change event is triggered by jQuery, so I managed to knock together a quick solution that involves removing the DOM 0 event handler and applying it again on a timer that executes immediately when the thread completes:

     jQuery(".myDropDown").change(function() {
         if ($.browser.msie) {
             var dd = $(this)[0], 
                 oc = dd.onchange;
             dd.onchange = null;
             window.setTimeout(function () {
               dd.onchange = oc;
             }, 0);
          }
     });

This works fine for me in IE8, just one "hello" alert appears, although you might want to add an IE check in there. Or not, it probably won't make a difference It definitely needs that check and I've added it to the sample. Here's my fiddle.

The only other solution would be to remove the DOM 0 handler and use the jQuery handler only.

share|improve this answer

Clone the control and add the clone immediately after the intended one and assign the event, then remove the control:

if ($.browser.msie && (parseInt($.browser.version, 10) == 8 || parseInt($.browser.version, 10) == 7)) {
    var btn2 = $(btn).clone();
    $(btn).after(btn2);
    $(btn).remove();
    $(btn2).bind("click", function () {
        //your function here
    });
}
share|improve this answer

something like this?

jQuery(".myDropDown").removeAttr('onchange').change(function() {

 alert(0);
});
share|improve this answer
    
Then it wouldn't fire at all :) – Nick Craver Jun 17 '10 at 11:17
    
ahhh... hmmm... can you please tell me why is that so nick?.... ;) well, I have not tried it though.. – Reigel Jun 17 '10 at 11:19
    
Sure :) Here's a demo, feel free to try your code: jsfiddle.net/jfjBH The onchange handler is what's firing twice, if you remove it, there's noting to fire. The current bug is he's getting 2 alerts in IE8. As a general rule, don't treat attributes as events (even though they're declared that way), they're not really related and it only works in IE IIRC. – Nick Craver Jun 17 '10 at 11:22
    
okay... thanks nick... I'm digging more on it.. ;) – Reigel Jun 17 '10 at 11:29

We actually solve the problem another way, since this is specific to IE, ASP.NET and select element, we use the following code:

$(function () {
if ($.browser.msie) {
    var prm = Sys.WebForms.PageRequestManager.getInstance();
    prm.add_pageLoaded(function() {
        $('select[onchange]:not(.iefixed)')
            .addClass('iefixed')
            .each(function () {
                var self = $(this), dd = self[0], action = self.attr('onchange');
                self.removeAttr('onchange').change(action);
                dd.onpropertychange = function() { dd.blur(); };
            });
    });
}
});
  1. This make sure that the fix is only applied to the select element that has autopostback set to true (onchange) once.
  2. Basically we rely on jQuery to fire the change event for us, but in order for IE to do that, we need to trigger element blur event when onpropertychange happens.
share|improve this answer

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