Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have a master table called "parent" and a related table called "childs"

Now I run a query against the master table to update some values with the sum from the child table like this.

UPDATE master m SET
    quantity1 = (SELECT SUM(quantity1) FROM childs c WHERE c.master_id = m.id),
    quantity2 = (SELECT SUM(quantity2) FROM childs c WHERE c.master_id = m.id),
    count =  (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM childs c WHERE c.master_id = m.id)
WHERE master_id = 666;

Which works as expected but is not a good style because I basically make multiple SELECT querys on the same result. Is there a way to optimize that? (Making a query first and storing the values is not an option.

I tried this:

UPDATE master m SET (quantity1, quantity2, count) = (
    SELECT SUM(quantity1), SUM(quantity2), COUNT(*)
       FROM childs c WHERE c.master_id = m.id
) WHERE master_id = 666;

but that doesn't work.

Update: Here is the solution, thanks to everbody:

You can do something like this:

UPDATE master m
  INNER JOIN childs c ON m.master_id = c.master_id
SET master.quantity1 = c.quantity1,
    master.count = 1

If you have only one child record at a time. However if you want to use a group function like SUM() in the joined table that doesn't work. Either you get a "Invalid use of group function" if you leave the "group by" part or a "You have an error in your sql syntax if you use "GROUP BY c.master_id"

-- This doesnt work :(
UPDATE master m
  INNER JOIN childs c ON m.master_id = c.master_id
SET master.quantity1 = SUM(c.quantity1),
    master.count = COUNT(c.*)
GROUP by c.master_id

The solution is to use JOIN with a subquery:

UPDATE master m
  INNER JOIN 
  (
    SELECT   master_id,
             SUM(quantity1) as quantity1,
             COUNT(*) as count
    FROM     childs c 
    GROUP BY master_id
  ) c
  ON c.master_id = m.master_id
SET m.quantity1 = c.quantity1,
    m.count = c.count
WHERE   m.master_id = 666;

But since this pulls every row from the childtable the overhead would likely be bigger than using more subqueries like in the original sql. So you should add a WHERE clause to the joined table to get only the rows you need.

Another interesting approach is this syntax, which does the same as the JOIN with the WHERE clause but you should only use if if you want to update all rows with the same values and your subquery only returns one row, since the result from the subquery gets appended to the result and can be used like any column.

UPDATE master m,
    (
      SELECT SUM(c.quantity1) as sum_of_quantity,
      COUNT(*) as rowcount FROM child c WHERE c.master_id = 666
    ) as c
SET m.quantity1 = c.sum_of_quantity,
    m.count = c.rowcount
WHERE m.master_id = 666;
share|improve this question
    
have you tried doing your Count before the update and store it ina variable to pass into your update? – Neil Knight Jun 17 '10 at 11:22
    
Which error do you have? Your update is correct. – ksogor Jun 17 '10 at 11:31
    
It looks like you have a couple of answers that should work below, but just want to point out that this seems like a very denormalized design between the repeating columns and the duplicated data. – Tom H Jun 17 '10 at 13:55
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Rewriting Lieven's solution to MySQL:

UPDATE master m 
JOIN (
    SELECT  master_id
            , SUM(quantity1) as quantity1
            , SUM(quantity2) as quantity2 
            , COUNT(*) as count
    FROM    childs c 
    GROUP BY
            master_id
) c
ON c.master_id = m.master_id
SET
  m.quantity1 = c.quantity1
  ,m.quantity2 = c.quantity2
  ,m.count = c.count
WHERE   m.master_id = 666;
share|improve this answer
    
Works like a charm but (look at the updates in my question) don't forget to add a where clause to the subquery or you will pull millions of rows from the DB just to join one record ;) – Jürgen Steinblock Jun 21 '10 at 11:13

I don't know if it is allowed in MySQL, but SQL Server allows you to use the result of a select in an update.

UPDATE master m SET
  quantity1 = c.quantity1
  , quantity2 = c.quantity2
  , count = c.count
FROM  master m
      INNER JOIN (
        SELECT  master_id
                , quantity1 = SUM(quantity1)
                , quantity2 = SUM(quantity2)
                , count = COUNT(*) 
        FROM    childs c 
        WHERE   master_id = 666
        GROUP BY
                master_id
      ) c ON c.master_id = m.master_id
share|improve this answer
    
+1, that is exactly how I'd do it – KM. Jun 17 '10 at 11:58
    
If you copy / paste the correct syntax for MySQL from my answer I'll delete that one. – Wrikken Jun 17 '10 at 12:03
    
@Wrikken, if you are certain this doesn't work with MySQL, by all means, OP should accept your answer. – Lieven Keersmaekers Jun 17 '10 at 12:13
    
Well, let's say it's a combined effort then (was erroring myself at first trying to do a direct join & a group by, of course that wouldn't work, what was I thinking...) – Wrikken Jun 17 '10 at 13:06
    
+1 Because this was the first one. However Wrikken is right. For MySQL the SET ... part has be be after the JOIN. – Jürgen Steinblock Jun 21 '10 at 11:11

You could select your data into a temporary table, and then update using that data.

If you also want to insert "new" data in the same roundtrip, look into INSERT INTO ... SELECT FROM ... ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE ...

If you already are doing inserts if row doesn't exist, then that would be redundant with this example.

example:

INSERT INTO master m (id, quantity1, quantity2, count)
SELECT master_id, SUM(quantity1) q1, SUM(quantity2) q1, COUNT(*) c
   FROM childs
   GROUP BY master_id
ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE 
   m.quantity1 = q1,
   m.quantity2 = q2,
   m.count = c

NOTE! This is untested code, but I think it should be possible to backreference the select result in the UPDATE.

Syntax reference: http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/insert.html

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.