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I know I could do this with closures (var self = this) if object was a function...

<a href="#" id="x">click here</a>

<script type="text/javascript">
    var object = {
        y : 1,

        handle_click : function (e) {
            alert('handling click');

            //want to access y here

            return false;
        },

        load : function () {
            document.getElementById('x').onclick = this.handle_click;
        }
    };

    object.load();
</script>
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4 Answers 4

The simplest way to bind the call to handle_click to the object it is defined in would be something like this:

        var self=this;
        document.getElementById('x').onclick = 
           function(e) { return self.handle_click(e) };

If you need to pass in parameters or want to make the code look cleaner (for instance, if you're setting up a lot of similar event handlers), you could use a currying technique to achieve the same:

bind : function(fn)
{
   var self = this;
   // copy arguments into local array
   var args = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 0); 
   // returned function replaces first argument with event arg,
   // calls fn with composite arguments
   return function(e) { args[0] = e; return fn.apply(self, args); };
},

...

        document.getElementById('x').onclick = this.bind(this.handle_click, 
           "this parameter is passed to handle_click()",
           "as is this one");
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The problem isn't the setting of the onclick handler, that works fine. The problem is that when handle_click executes, there is no access to the value of the "y" variable. –  Jason Bunting Nov 20 '08 at 18:12
    
@Jason: what's wrong with this.y ? –  Shog9 Nov 20 '08 at 18:14
    
It doesn't work - I tested it and it comes back undefined because of how the event handler works, "this" becomes the element that fired the click event (at least it does in FF3). –  Jason Bunting Nov 20 '08 at 18:15
    
Ok, maybe i'm misunderstanding the problem? The code sw234 posted works fine - but as you noted, there's no access to 'y' from within 'handle_click'. I thought he was asking how to bind the handler such that it would provide access to 'y' via this... –  Shog9 Nov 20 '08 at 18:20
    
Well, maybe I am misunderstanding the problem as well - there are multiple ways of dealing with this, yours works as well. –  Jason Bunting Nov 20 '08 at 18:24

So, the event handler part wires up just fine (I tested it myself) but, as your comment indicates, you have no access to the "y" property of the object you just defined.

This works:

var object = { 
  y : 1, 
  handle_click : function (e) {
    alert('handling click');

    //want to access y here 
    alert(this.y); 

    return false; 
  }, 
  load : function () { 
    var that = this; 
    document.getElementById('x').onclick = function(e) {
      that.handle_click(e); // pass-through the event object
    }; 
  } 
}; 
object.load();

There are other ways of doing this too, but this works.

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Jason, you can change alert(y); to alert(this.y);, and the results are the same - you're already calling the handler in the context of object, no need to pass in y as an argument. –  Shog9 Nov 20 '08 at 18:23
    
Yeah, I see that. I need to refrain from posting when I am under the influence of pain killers. :P –  Jason Bunting Nov 20 '08 at 18:33
    
Updated to reflect that... –  Jason Bunting Nov 20 '08 at 18:33

I see how to do it with Jason's latest one. Any way to do it without the anonymous function?

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You're stuck with either a closure or a global variable. Why would you turn your nose up at a closure? They are one of the best features of JavaScript... –  Shog9 Nov 20 '08 at 22:45

We can directly pass an object with a handler method thanks to AddEventListener, and you will have access to its attributes: http://www.thecssninja.com/javascript/handleevent

Hope this will help those who, like me, will look for this topic some years after!

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