Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've created a generic wrapper for using the Cache object:

public class Cache<T> where T : class
{
    public Cache Cache {get;set;}
    public CachedKeys Key {get;set;}

    public Cache(Cache cache, CachedKeys key){
        Cache = cache;
        Key = key;
    }

    public void AddToCache(T obj){
        Cache.Add(Key.ToString(),
            obj,
            null,
            DateTime.Now.AddMinutes(5),
            System.Web.Caching.Cache.NoSlidingExpiration,
            System.Web.Caching.CacheItemPriority.Normal,
            null);                   
    }

    public bool TryGetFromCache(out T cachedData) {
        cachedData = Cache[Key.ToString()] as T;
        return cachedData != null;
    }

    public void RemoveFromCache() {
        Cache.Remove(Key.ToString()); }
}

The CachedKeys enumeration is just a list of keys that can be used to cache data.

The trouble is, to call it is quite convuluted:

var cache = new Cache<MyObject>(Page.Cache, CachedKeys.MyKey);
MyObject myObject = null;

if(!cache.TryGetFromCache(out myObject)){
    //get data...
    cache.AddToCache(data); //add to cache
    return data;
}

return myObject;

I only store one instance of each of my objects in the cache.

Therefore, is there any way that I can create an extension method that accepts the type of object to Cache and uses (via Reflection) its Name as the cache key?

public static Cache<T> GetCache(this Cache cache, Type cacheType){
        Cache<cacheType> Cache = new Cache<cacheType>(cache, cacheType.Name);
    }

Of course, there's two errors here:

  • Extension methods must be defined in a non-generic static class
  • The type or namespace name 'cacheType' could not be found

This is clearly not the right approach but I thought I'd show my working. Could somebody guide me in the right direction?

share|improve this question
    
Is this method thread safe? –  Steve B Apr 25 '13 at 13:46
    
No - you could introduce double checked locking (even that isn't guaranteed) but to lazy-fill a cache I'd suggest that any locking would introduce unnecessary lag. You could fill the cache on a background thread running a timer (if you're happy with a thread being taken out of the threadpool to do this). I tend not to worry though - I don't think lazy-filling a cache needs to be thread safe. –  David Neale Apr 25 '13 at 14:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I ended up using generic extension methods:

public static class CacheExtensions
{
    public static void Remove<T>(this Cache cache) where T : class
    {
        cache.Remove(typeof(T).Name);
    }

    public static void AddToCache<T>(this Cache cache, object item) where T : class
    {
        T outItem = null;
        if (cache.TryGetItemFromCache<T>(out outItem))
            throw new ArgumentException("This item is already in the cache");

        cache.Insert(typeof(T).Name,
                item,
                null,
                DateTime.Now.AddMinutes(5),
                System.Web.Caching.Cache.NoSlidingExpiration,
                System.Web.Caching.CacheItemPriority.Normal,
                null);
    }

    public static bool TryGetItemFromCache<T>(this Cache cache, out T item) where T : class
    {
         item = cache.Get(typeof(T).Name) as T;
         return item != null;
    }
}

Called like:

MyObject myObject = null;
if(!Cache.TryGetItemFromCache(out myObject)){
     //get data
     Cache.AddToCache<MyObject>(data);
}

and..

Cache.Remove<MyObject>();
share|improve this answer

How about:

public static Cache<T> GetCache<T>(this Cache cache)
{
    return new Cache<T>(cache, typeof(T).Name);
}

This will of course have to be defined in another class.

share|improve this answer
    
That's basically what I already have in my Cache constructor (apart from using the Name property as a key, which is a bit of an after-thought). –  David Neale Jun 17 '10 at 13:23
    
But it does what you want, doesn't it? –  ErikHeemskerk Jun 17 '10 at 13:32
    
Yes true, I hadn't thought of simply making a generic method instead of a generic class. I've ended up simply adding generic extension methods to achieve the functionality now. –  David Neale Jun 17 '10 at 14:04

I think the following method needs to be changed:

 public static bool TryGetItemFromCache<T>(this Cache cache, out T item) where T : class
    {
         item = cache.Get(typeof(T).Name) as T;
         return item != null;
    }

If the item is not in the cache don't you want to put the item in the cache for later use or later retrieval.

Thanks,

share|improve this answer
    
That will be handled in the calling code. The Cache has no knowledge of where the data is coming from. –  David Neale Jun 17 '10 at 14:28

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.