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This is one of the minor CSS problems that plagues me constantly. How do folks around StackOverflow vertically align checkboxes and their labels consistently cross-browser? Whenever I align them correctly in Safari (usually using vertical-align: baseline on the input), they're completely off in Firefox and IE. Fix it in Firefox, and Safari and IE are inevitably messed up. I waste time on this every time I code a form.

Here's the standard code that I work with:

<form>
    <div>
        <label><input type="checkbox" /> Label text</label>
    </div>
</form>

I usually use Eric Meyer's reset, so form elements are relatively clean of overrides. Looking forward to any tips or tricks that you have to offer!

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74  
ho, this is one of the ugliest problems in layout –  vsync Jul 27 '11 at 15:03
1  
Put each checkbox and label within an <li> element. Add overflow:hidden to the <li> and float the label and checkbox left. Then they all align perfectly fine. Don't put the checkbox within the label element obviously. –  volume one Jan 18 at 18:37
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30 Answers 30

up vote 535 down vote accepted

After over an hour of tweaking, testing, and trying different styles of markup, I think I may have a decent solution. The requirements for this particular project were:

  1. Inputs must be on their own line
  2. Checkbox inputs need to align vertically with the label text similarly (if not identically) across all browsers
  3. If the label text wraps, it needs to be indented (so no wrapping down underneath the checkbox)

Before I get into any explanation, I'll just give you the code:

<form>
    <div>
        <label><input type="checkbox" /> Label text</label>
    </div>
</form>

<style type="text/css">
label {
    display: block;
    padding-left: 15px;
    text-indent: -15px;
}
input {
    width: 13px;
    height: 13px;
    padding: 0;
    margin:0;
    vertical-align: bottom;
    position: relative;
    top: -1px;
    *overflow: hidden;
}
</style>

Here is the working example in JSFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/t8EGn/6/

This code assumes that you're using a reset like Eric Meyer's that doesn't override form input margins and padding (hence putting margin and padding resets in the input CSS). Obviously in a live environment you'll probably be nesting/overriding stuff to support other input elements, but I wanted to keep things simple.

Things to note:

  • The *overflow declaration is an inline IE hack (the star-property hack). Both IE 6 and 7 will notice it, but Safari and Firefox will properly ignore it. I think it might be valid CSS, but you're still better off with conditional comments; just used it for simplicity.
  • As best I can tell, the only vertical-align statement that was consistent across browsers was vertical-align: bottom. Setting this and then relatively positioning upwards behaved almost identically in Safari, Firefox and IE with only a pixel or two of discrepancy.
  • The major problem in working with alignment is that IE sticks a bunch of mysterious space around input elements. It isn't padding or margin, and it's damned persistent. Setting a width and height on the checkbox and then overflow: hidden for some reason cuts off the extra space and allows IE's positioning to act very similarly to Safari and Firefox.
  • Depending on your text sizing, you'll no doubt need to adjust the relative positioning, width, height, and so forth to get things looking right.

Hope this helps someone else! I haven't tried this specific technique on any projects other than the one I was working on this morning, so definitely pipe up if you find something that works more consistently.

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6  
note. You should probably put a "for" attribute on your label, to ensure it works for all browsers and text readers. ( I realize you probably left it off for simplicity) –  Armstrongest Nov 26 '08 at 21:34
199  
Good grief, I hadn't realized how many people were ignorant of this: if you are wrapping the input in the label tag, the "for" attribute is unnecessary. Feel free to see for yourself: w3.org/TR/html401/interact/forms.html#h-17.9.1 –  One Crayon Nov 28 '08 at 17:33
16  
Wow, I plead guilty here as well. Labels surrounding input controls FTW! Going to do this from now on... –  cowgod Jan 30 '09 at 14:50
9  
I disagree with the suggestion about using conditional comments. Keep the *foobar CSS hack. That works well, is used by frameworks like YUI, and allows you to keep together what belongs together. –  ebruchez Jan 30 '09 at 17:54
9  
Tried this is out in Chrome 28, Mac OSX, and the checkbox is visibly lower than the text –  MusikAnimal Aug 19 '13 at 17:42
show 20 more comments

Sometimes vertical-align needs two inline (span, label, input, etc...) elements next to each other to work properly. The following checkboxes are properly vertically centered in IE, Safari, FF, and Chrome, even if the text size is very small or large.

They all float next to each other on the same line, but the nowrap means that the whole label text always stays next to the checkbox.

The downside is the extra meaningless SPAN tags.

<style type="text/css">
.checkboxes label {
    display: block;
    float: left;
    padding-right: 10px;
    white-space: nowrap;
}
.checkboxes input {
    vertical-align: middle;
}
.checkboxes label span {
    vertical-align: middle;
}
</style>

<form>
    <div class="checkboxes">
        <label for="x"><input type="checkbox" id="x" /> <span>Label text x</span></label>
        <label for="y"><input type="checkbox" id="y" /> <span>Label text y</span></label>
        <label for="z"><input type="checkbox" id="z" /> <span>Label text z</span></label>
    </div>
</form>

Now, if you had a very long label text that needed to wrap without wrapping under the checkbox, you'd use padding and negative text indent on the label elements:

.checkboxes label {
    display: block;
    float: left;
    padding-right: 10px;
    padding-left: 22px;
    text-indent: -22px;
}
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5  
Thanks! The "vertical-align: middle" on both the input and the span worked great for me. –  William Gross Aug 12 '10 at 14:42
    
This works great with bootstrap 3.0 css. –  angelokh Nov 15 '13 at 7:20
1  
display: block; float: left; seems to be redundant –  PHPst Dec 18 '13 at 14:18
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working off of One Crayon's solution, I have something that works for me and is simpler:

input[type=checkbox], input[type=radio] {
    vertical-align: middle;
    position: relative;
    bottom: 1px;
}
input[type=radio] {
    bottom: 2px;
}

renders pixel-for-pixel the same in safari (whose baseline I trust) and both firefox and IE7 check out as good. it also works for various label font sizes, big and small. now, for fixing IE's baseline on selects and inputs.....

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7  
Just a note for others: this won't work in IE6 because it doesn't support the [type=checkbox] CSS targeting. –  One Crayon Apr 8 '09 at 0:18
    
great Fix, thank you! –  user2952265 Jul 9 at 7:24
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Try my solution, I tried it in IE 6, FF2 and Chrome and it renders pixel by pixel in all the three browsers.

<style type="text/css">
* {
    padding: 0px;
    margin: 0px;
}
#wb {
    width: 15px;
    height: 15px;
    float: left;
}
#somelabel {
    float: left;
    padding-left: 3px;
}
</style>

<div>
    <input id="wb" type="checkbox" />
        <label for="wb" id="somelabel">Web Browser</label>
</div>
share|improve this answer
1  
Interesting; I like the idea of floating both elements; that elegantly fixes the wrapping issue. I am attached to wrapping input with label, but that code is a heck of a lot cleaner than the solution I arrived at. –  One Crayon Jan 31 '09 at 3:54
    
in this example the checkbox input and label should be also have property display: block and in such case they will be treated as normal DIV's that can be aligned easily –  se_pavel Apr 17 '09 at 7:27
2  
this has a problem, what happens if the label doesn't fit into the available space? the label and checkbox are separated (the checkbox is up-right, and the label down-left). If you wrap the checkbox inside your label you don't have this problem. –  Enrique Apr 17 '11 at 23:58
    
It did not work to the pixel, but it was decent enough to get things to look better on the 3 major browsers. I suppose I could have spent another hour to see that it would work better... –  Alexis Wilke Jan 7 at 6:02
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One easy thing that seems to work well is to apply a adjust the vertical position of the checkbox with vertical-align. It will still be vary across browsers, but the solution is uncomplicated.

input {
    vertical-align: -2px;
}

Reference: http://www.cssdesignpatterns.com/Chapter%2012%20-%20ALIGNING%20CONTENT/Vertical-offset%20Content/example.html

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try vertical-align: middle

also your code seems like it should be:

<form>
    <div>
        <input id="blah" type="checkbox" /><label for="blah">Label text</label>
    </div>
</form>
share|improve this answer
    
<label for="blah"> is only necessary if you're using something where it doesn't make sense for the label to wrap (like a textbox; I'll generally use <label for="blah">Foo</label><input id="blah" type="text" /> in that instance). With checkboxes I find it's less markup to wrap it. –  One Crayon Nov 20 '08 at 18:13
9  
Not exactly true: The Label-for will allow users to click the label in order to check the checkbox, in addition to simply clicking the checkbox itself. It's quite handy for tying the two elements together. –  EndangeredMassa Nov 20 '08 at 18:30
14  
If an input is nested inside a label, then clicking the label with activate/give focus to the input; the for attribute is solely for the case when the input is not nested. –  One Crayon Nov 20 '08 at 18:34
2  
That's true One Crayon, but it's still good practice to use the "for" attribute, or you will have problems with some browsers that don't recognize this syntax cough IE. –  Armstrongest Nov 26 '08 at 21:33
    
if you don't want your checkbox to have an ID then you need to wrap the checkbox inside the label –  Simon_Weaver Jan 30 '09 at 12:02
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I usually use line height in order to adjust the vertical position of my static text:

<form>
   <div>
      <label><input type="checkbox" /> Label text</label>
   </div>
</form>

<style type="text/css">
label {
   line-height: 18px;
}
input {
   width: 13px;
   height: 18px;
   font-size: 12px;
   line-height: 12px;
}
</style>

Hope that helps.

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I've never had a problem with doing it like this:

<form>
  <div>
    <input type="checkbox" id="cb" /> <label for="cb">Label text</label>
  </div>
</form>
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3  
As I've said to previous posters who recommended that: I don't like it because it requires unnecessary markup. Also, I tried that markup but it was difficult to prevent the label from wrapping beneath the input (while still having label/input group each on their own lines). –  One Crayon Nov 20 '08 at 19:56
4  
So, instead of "unecessary" markup (used by probably almost everyone), you'd rather have unecessary CSS? –  Robert C. Barth Jan 30 '09 at 6:49
9  
The problem with wrapping stands. But in general, yes I'd rather have extraneous CSS than markup since the CSS is cached, but the markup may have to be loaded anew for every new page. –  One Crayon Jan 31 '09 at 3:49
2  
Compare: 1 instance of extra CSS -vs- many instances of extra markup. –  Greg Aug 17 '11 at 21:27
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If you use ASP.NET Web Forms you don't need to worry about DIVs and other elements or fixed sizes. We can align the <asp:CheckBoxList> text by setting float:left to the CheckboxList input type in CSS.

Please check the following example code:

.CheckboxList
{
    font-size: 14px;
    color: #333333;
}
.CheckboxList input
{
    float: left;
    clear: both;
}

.ASPX code:

<asp:CheckBoxList runat="server" ID="c1" RepeatColumns="2" CssClass="CheckboxList">
</asp:CheckBoxList>
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This works well for me:

fieldset {
    text-align:left;
    border:none
}
fieldset ol, fieldset ul {
    padding:0;
    list-style:none
}
fieldset li {
    padding-bottom:1.5em;
    float:none;
    clear:left
}
label {
    float:left;
    width:7em;
    margin-right:1em
}
fieldset.checkboxes li {
    clear:both;
    padding:.75em
}
fieldset.checkboxes label {
    margin:0 0 0 1em;
    width:20em
}
fieldset.checkboxes input {
    float:left
}
<form>
    <fieldset class="checkboxes">
        <ul>
            <li>
                <input type="checkbox" name="happy" value="yep" id="happy" />
                <label for="happy">Happy?</label>
            </li>
            <li>
                <input type="checkbox" name="hungry" value="yep" id="hungry" />
                <label for="hungry">Hungry?</label>
            </li>
        </ul>
    </fieldset>
</form>
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7  
bless you for using ems instead of pxs. –  IDisposable Jan 31 '09 at 6:45
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Just wanted to add to the discussion about the 'for' attribute on labels (slightly offtopic):

Please do supply it, even when it's not necessary, because it's so very convenient to use from javascript:

var label = ...
var input = document.getElementById(label.htmlFor);

That's a lot more convenient than trying to figure out wheter the label has the input nested, or wheter the input is before the label, or after.. etc. And it never hurts to supply it.. so.

Just my 2 cents.

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then you lose the accessibility goodness it grants screen readers. –  albert Dec 30 '10 at 20:41
    
The for attribute in this particular case (when the input element is inside of the label element) is not needed as per the standards. You can use the for in this case if you have a need such as described by the answer or if you want to support old, non-standards compliant browsers. –  Alex Jorgenson Sep 30 '12 at 21:10
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I have not completely tested my solution, but it seems to work great.

My HTML is simply:

<label class="checkbox"><input type="checkbox" value="0000">0000 - 0100</label>

I then set all checkboxes to 24px for both height and width. To make the text aligned I make the label's line-height also 24px and assign vertical-align: top; like so:

EDIT: After IE testing I added vertical-align: bottom; to the input and changed the label's CSS. You may find you need a conditional IE css case to sort out padding - but the text and box are inline.

input[type="checkbox"] {
    width: 24px;
    height: 24px;
    vertical-align: bottom;
}
label.checkbox {
    vertical-align: top;
    line-height: 24px;
    margin: 2px 0;
    display: block;
    height: 24px;
}

If anyone finds that this doesn't work, please kindly let me know. Here is it in action (in Chrome and IE - apologies as screenshots were taken on retina and using parallels for IE):

screenshot of checkboxes: Chrome screenshot of checkboxes: IE

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<form>
    <div>
        <label style="display: inline-block">
            <input style="vertical-align: middle" type="checkbox" />
            <span style="vertical-align: middle">Label text</span>
         </label>
    </div>
</form>

The trick is to use vertical-align only in table cells or inline-block if using label tag.

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With an input type checkbox wrapped inside the label and floated to the left like so:

<label for="id" class="checkbox">
    <input type="checkbox" id="id">
    <span>The Label</span>
</label>

this worked for me:

label.checkbox {
    display: block;
}
.checkbox input {
    float: left;
    height: 18px;
    vertical-align: middle;
}
.checkbox span {
    float: left;
    line-height: 18px;
    margin: 0 0 0 20px;
}

Make sure the height of the is identical to the line-height of the (blocklevel) .

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I think this is the easiest way

input {
    position: relative;
    top: 1px;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/t8EGn/3677/

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I usually leave a checkbox unlabeled and then make its "label" a separate element. It's a pain, but there's so much cross-browser difference between how checkboxes and their labels are displayed (as you've noticed) that this is the only way I can come close to controlling how everything looks.

I also end up doing this in winforms development, for the same reason. I think the fundamental problem with the checkbox control is that it is really two different controls: the box and the label. By using a checkbox, you're leaving it up to the implementers of the control to decide how those two elements are displayed next to each other (and they always get it wrong, where wrong = not what you want).

I really hope someone has a better answer to your question.

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If you're using Twitter Bootstrap, you can just use the checkbox class on the <label>:

<label class="checkbox">
    <input type="checkbox"> Remember me
</label>
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CSS:

.threeCol .listItem {
    width:13.9em;
    padding:.2em;
    margin:.2em;
    float:left;
    border-bottom:solid #f3f3f3 1px;
}
.threeCol input {
    float:left;
    width:auto;
    margin:.2em .2em .2em 0;
    border:none;
    background:none;
}
.threeCol label {
    float:left;
    margin:.1em 0 .1em 0;
}

HTML:

<div class="threeCol">
    <div class="listItem">
        <input type="checkbox" name="name" id="id" value="checkbox1" />
        <label for="name">This is your checkBox</label>
    </div>
</div>

The above code will place your list items in threecols and just change widths to suit.

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input {
    margin: 0;
}

actually does the trick

share|improve this answer
    
also need to add vertical-align:top or vertical-align:bottom. Depends.. on the position where it needs to get aligned –  maxspan Mar 5 at 22:26
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Yay thanks! This too has been driving me nuts forever.

In my particular case, this worked for me:

input {
    width: 13px;
    height: 13px;
    padding: 0;
    margin:0;
    vertical-align: top;
    position: relative;
    *top: 1px;
    *overflow: hidden;
}
label {
    display: block;
    padding: 0;
    padding-left: 15px;
    text-indent: -15px;
    border: 0px solid;
    margin-left: 5px;
    vertical-align: top;
}

I am using the reset.css which might explain some of the differences, but this seems to work well for me.

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<fieldset class="checks">
    <legend>checks for whatevers</legend>
    <input type="" id="x" />
    <label for="x">Label</label>
    <input type="" id="y" />
    <label for="y">Label</label>
    <input type="" id="z" />
    <label for="z">Label</label>
</fieldset>

You should wrap form controls grouped together in their own fieldsets anyways, here, it plays the wrappa. set input/label do display:block, input float left, label float right, set your widths, control spacing with left/right margins, align label text accordingly.

so

fieldset.checks {
    width:200px
}
.checks input, .checks label {
    display:block;
}
.checks input {
    float:right;
    width:10px;
    margin-right:5px
}
.checks label {
    float:left;
    width:180px;
    margin-left:5px;
    text-align:left;
    text-indent:5px
}

you probably need to set border, outline and line-height on both as well for cross-browser/media solutions.

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position: relative; has some issues in IE with z-index and animations like jQuery's slideUp/slideDown.

CSS:

input[type=checkbox], input[type=radio] {
    vertical-align: baseline;
    position: relative;
    top: 3px;
    margin: 0 3px 0 0;
    padding: 0px;
}
input.ie7[type=checkbox], input.ie7[type=radio] {
    vertical-align: middle;
    position: static;
    margin-bottom: -2px;
    height: 13px;
    width: 13px;
}

jQuery:

$(document).ready(function () {
    if ($.browser.msie && $.browser.version <= 7) {
        $('input[type=checkbox]').addClass('ie7');
        $('input[type=radio]').addClass('ie7');
    }
});

The styling probably needs tweaks depending on the font-size used in <label>

PS:
I use ie7js to make the css work in IE6.

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The chosen answer with 400+ upvotes did not work for me in Chrome 28 OSX, probably because it wasn't tested in OSX or that it did work in whatever was around in 2008, when this question was answered.

The times have changed, and new CSS3 solutions are now feasible. My solution uses pseudoelements to create a custom checkbox. So the stipulations (pros or cons, however you look at it) are as follows:

  • Only works in modern browsers (FF3.6+, IE9+, Chrome, Safari)
  • Relies on a custom designed checkbox, that will be rendered exactly the same in every browser/OS. Here I've just chose some simple colours, but you could always add linear gradients and such to give it more of a bang.
  • Is geared to a certain font/font size, which if changed, you'd simply change the positioning and size of the checkbox to make it appear vertically aligned. If tweaked correctly, the end result should still be near to exactly the same in all browser / operating systems.
  • No vertical-alignment properties, no floats
  • Must use the provided markup in my example, it will not work if structured like the question, however the layout will essentially look the same. If you want to move things around, you'll have to also move the associated CSS

Your HTML:

<form>
    <div class="checkbox">
        <input id="check_me" type=checkbox />
        <label for="check_me">Label for checkbox</label>
    </div>
</form>

Your CSS:

div.checkbox {
    position: relative;
    font-family: Arial;
    font-size: 13px;
}
label {
    position: relative;
    padding-left: 16px;
}
label::before {
    content :"";
    display: inline-block;
    width: 10px;
    height: 10px;
    background-color: white;
    border: solid 1px #9C9C9C;
    position: absolute;
    top: 1px;
    left: 0px;
}
label::after {
    content:"";
    width: 8px;
    height: 8px;
    background-color: #666666;
    position: absolute;
    left: 2px;
    top: 3px;
    display: none;
}
input[type=checkbox] {
    visibility: hidden;
    position: absolute;
}
input[type=checkbox]:checked + label::after {
    display: block;
}
input[type=checkbox]:active + label::before {
    background-color: #DDDDDD;
}

This solution hides the checkbox, and adds and styles pseudoelements to the label to create the visible checkbox. Because the label is tied to the hidden checkbox, the input field will still get updated and the value will be submitted with the form.

jsFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/SgXYY/6/

And if you're interested, here's my take at radio buttons: http://jsfiddle.net/DtKrV/2/

Hope someone finds this useful!

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This is not the best way of going about solving the issue

vertical-align: middle

Adding style="position:relative;top:2px;" to the input box would move it down 2px. So depending on your font size, you can move it along.

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Maybe some folk are making the same mistake I did? Which was... I had set a width for the input boxes, because they were mostly of type 'text' , but then forgotten to over-ride that width for checkboxes - so my checkbox was trying to occupy a lot of excess width and so it was tough to align a label beside it.

.checkboxlabel {
    width: 100%;
    vertical-align: middle;
}
.checkbox {
    width: 20px !important;
}
<label for='acheckbox' class='checkboxlabel'>
    <input name="acheckbox" id='acheckbox' type="checkbox" class='checkbox'>Contact me</label>

Gives clickable labels and and proper alignment as far back as IE6 (using a class selector) and in late versions of Firefox, Safari and Chrome

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try this code

input[type="checkbox"] {
    -moz-appearance: checkbox;
    -webkit-appearance: checkbox;
    margin-left:3px;
    border:0;
    vertical-align: middle;
    top: -1px;
    bottom: 1px;
    *overflow: hidden;
    box-sizing: border-box; /* 1 */
    *height: 13px; /* Removes excess padding in IE 7 */
    *width: 13px;
    background: #fff;
}
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I found out one way to do it that gives the same result in almost all browsers. At the very least up-to-date browsers. It works in Firefox, Chrome, Safari, Opera. In IE it will just look almost as if there were no rules applied for inputs or labels (i.e., it'll still have the label a few pixels below the input), so I think it's excusable.

HTML

<label class="boxfix"><input type="radio">Label</label>

CSS

.boxfix {
    vertical-align: bottom;
}
.boxfix input {
    margin: 0;
    vertical-align: bottom;
    position: relative;
    top: 1.999px; /* the inputs are slightly more centered in IE at 1px (they don't interpret the .999 here), and Opera will round it to 2px with three decimals */
}
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For consistency with form fields across browsers we use : box-sizing: border-box

button, checkbox, input, radio, textarea, submit, reset, search, any-form-field {
    -moz-box-sizing: border-box;
    -webkit-box-sizing: border-box;
    box-sizing: border-box;
}
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So I know this has been answered many times, but I feel I have a way more elegant solution then those that have been provided already. And not only 1 elegant solution, but 2 separate solutions to tickle your fancy. With that said, everything you need to know and see are contained in 2 JS Fiddle's, with comments.


Solution #1 relies on the native "Checkbox" of the given browser, though with a twist.. Its contained in a div which is easier to position cross browser, with a overflow: hidden to chop the excess of a 1px steched checkbox (this is so you cant see the ugly borders of FF)

Simple HTML: (follow the link to review the css with comments, code block is to satisfy stackoverflow) http://jsfiddle.net/KQghJ/

<label><div class="checkbox"><input type="checkbox" /></div> Label text</label>

Solution #2 uses the "Checkbox Toggle Hack" to toggle the css state of a DIV, which has been properly positioned across browser, and setup with a simple sprite for the checkbox unchecked and checked states. All that is needed is to adjust the background-position with said Checkbox Toggle Hack. This, in my opinion, is the more elegant solution as you have more control over your checkboxes & radios, and can guarantee they look the same across browser.

Simple HTML: (follow the link to review the css with comments, code block is to satisfy stackoverflow) http://jsfiddle.net/Sx5M2/

<label><input type="checkbox" /><div class="checkbox"></div>Label text</label>

If anyone disagree's with these methods, please leave me a comment, I would love to hear some feedback on why others have not come across these solutions, or if they have, why I see no answers here regarding them? If anyone sees one of these methods fail, it would be nice to see that too, but these have been tested in the latest browsers and rely on html / css methods that are quite old, and universal as far as I have seen.

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protected by Robert Harvey Jul 11 '12 at 21:44

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