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Can you do this in PHP? I've heard conflicting opinions:

Something like:

Class bar {
   function a_function () { echo "hi!"; }
}

Class foo {
   public $bar;
   function __construct() {
       $this->bar = new bar();
   }
}
$x = new foo();
$x->bar->a_function();

Will this echo "hi!" or not?

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1  
Have you tried it, and did it work or not? –  ChrisF Jun 17 '10 at 14:34
    
Fatal error: Call to a member function a_function() on a non-object –  Sarfraz Jun 17 '10 at 14:34
2  
How's that a class within a class? It's an object within a class. –  Jan Kuboschek Jun 17 '10 at 14:37
2  
Conflicting opinions? A member variable can take any value. Maybe someone thought that you mean defining classes inside other classes (like private classes in Java)... –  Felix Kling Jun 17 '10 at 14:37
1  
Sorry, $bar = new bar(); should be $this->bar = new bar(); My mistake. I've updated the post –  Matt Jun 17 '10 at 14:39

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It's perfectly fine, and I'm not sure why anyone would tell you that you shouldn't be doing it and/or that it can't be done.

Your example won't work because you're assigning new Bar() to a variable and not a property, though.

$this->bar = new Bar();

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Thanks, realised that, and have changed the example –  Matt Jun 17 '10 at 14:48

Will this echo "hi!" or not?

No

Change this line:

$bar = new bar();

to:

$this->bar = new bar();

to output:

hi!
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Yeah :) sorry, forgot to do that Thanks –  Matt Jun 17 '10 at 14:39

In a class, you need to prefix all member variables with $this->. So your foo class's constructor should be:

function __construct() {
    $this->bar = new bar();
}

Then it should work quite fine...

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Yes, you can. The only requirement is that (since you're calling it outside both classes), in

$x->bar->a_function();

both bar is a public property and a_function is a public function. a_function does not have a public modifier, but it's implicit since you specified no access modifier.

edit: (you have had a bug, though, see the other answers)

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Thanks. Thats what I thought, but my code always seems to fail right after I start making these nested classes. anyway... I must be the problem. ;) –  Matt Jun 17 '10 at 14:48
    
@Matt PHP does not support nested classes. This is called object composition. See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Object_composition –  Artefacto Jun 17 '10 at 14:55
    
yeah i've caused a bit of confusion with my wording. I suppose what I really meant was nested objects. thanks for the help –  Matt Jun 17 '10 at 14:57

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