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I need to figure out the operating system my program is running on during runtime.

I'm using Qt 4.6.2, MinGW and Eclipse with CDT. My program shall run a command-line QProcess on Windows or Linux. Now I need a kind of switch to run the different code depending on the operating system.

Thx

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6 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Actually the Operating System is defined by the Q_OS_... macros. Just saying. The Q_WS_... are windowing system. Not exactly the same. (I'm just reading what the author of the question wrote.... "operating system".)

These declarations are found in the qglobal.h file.

Use Q_OS_x with x being one of:

 DARWIN   - Darwin OS (synonym for Q_OS_MAC)
 SYMBIAN  - Symbian
 MSDOS    - MS-DOS and Windows
 OS2      - OS/2
 OS2EMX   - XFree86 on OS/2 (not PM)
 WIN32    - Win32 (Windows 2000/XP/Vista/7 and Windows Server 2003/2008)
 WINCE    - WinCE (Windows CE 5.0)
 CYGWIN   - Cygwin
 SOLARIS  - Sun Solaris
 HPUX     - HP-UX
 ULTRIX   - DEC Ultrix
 LINUX    - Linux
 FREEBSD  - FreeBSD
 NETBSD   - NetBSD
 OPENBSD  - OpenBSD
 BSDI     - BSD/OS
 IRIX     - SGI Irix
 OSF      - HP Tru64 UNIX
 SCO      - SCO OpenServer 5
 UNIXWARE - UnixWare 7, Open UNIX 8
 AIX      - AIX
 HURD     - GNU Hurd
 DGUX     - DG/UX
 RELIANT  - Reliant UNIX
 DYNIX    - DYNIX/ptx
 QNX      - QNX
 QNX6     - QNX RTP 6.1
 LYNX     - LynxOS
 BSD4     - Any BSD 4.4 system
 UNIX     - Any UNIX BSD/SYSV system

The window system definitions are like this:

Use Q_WS_x where x is one of:

 MACX     - Mac OS X
 MAC9     - Mac OS 9
 QWS      - Qt for Embedded Linux
 WIN32    - Windows
 X11      - X Window System
 S60      - Symbian S60
 PM       - unsupported
 WIN16    - unsupported

One of the main problems with using #ifdef is to make sure that if you compile on a "new" platform (never compiled that software on that platform) then you want to use #elif defined(...) and at least an #else + #error ...

#ifdef W_OS_LINUX
  std::cout << "Linux version";
#elif defined(W_OS_CYGWIN)
  std::cout << "Cygwin version";
#else
#error "We don't support that version yet..."
#endif
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In Qt the following OS macros are defined for compile time options

Qt/X11 = Q_WS_X11 is defined.
Qt/Windows = Q_WS_WIN is defined.
Qt/Mac OS X = Q_WS_MACX is defined

Then the QSysInfo class gives you the OS version and other options at runtime.

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QT-specific macros. Me like. +1 –  Randolpho Jun 17 '10 at 15:37
    
Ok, but then I have to deliver different version depending on the operating system? –  walle Jun 17 '10 at 15:38
1  
@walle: yes, definitely. This is not a bad thing. –  Randolpho Jun 17 '10 at 15:40
    
you should anyway compile for each target, so there's no problem at all. –  ShinTakezou Jun 17 '10 at 15:49
    
@walle - yes, without some sort of runtime system like python/java/c# the executable format is different on each OS. Qt just lets you write the same source file for each. You also generally need different installers on each platform –  Martin Beckett Jun 17 '10 at 16:30
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Qt offers QSysInfo if you really need to get at this at run-time. Useful for appending to a crash report but for anything else try to do it at compile time.

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Do it at compile time using #ifdef.

Under windows, WIN32 is defined.

So, do:

#ifdef WIN32
// Windows code here
#else
// UNIX code here
#endif
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This is typically done using precompiler directives to control what chunk of code is included/excluded from your build.

#ifdef WIN32
  // ...
#endif

This results in (arguably) uglier code, but targeted binaries.

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Since Qt5 macroses Q_WS_* are not defined!

You should use Q_OS_* macroses instead:

Q_OS_AIX
Q_OS_ANDROID
Q_OS_BSD4
Q_OS_BSDI
Q_OS_CYGWIN
Q_OS_DARWIN - Darwin-based OS such as OS X and iOS, including any open source version(s) of Darwin.
Q_OS_DGUX
Q_OS_DYNIX
Q_OS_FREEBSD
Q_OS_HPUX
Q_OS_HURD
Q_OS_IOS
Q_OS_IRIX
Q_OS_LINUX
Q_OS_LYNX
Q_OS_MAC - Darwin-based OS distributed by Apple, which currently includes OS X and iOS, but not the open source version.
Q_OS_NETBSD
Q_OS_OPENBSD
Q_OS_OSF
Q_OS_OSX
Q_OS_QNX
Q_OS_RELIANT
Q_OS_SCO
Q_OS_SOLARIS
Q_OS_ULTRIX
Q_OS_UNIX
Q_OS_UNIXWARE
Q_OS_WIN32 - 32-bit and 64-bit versions of Windows (not on Windows CE).
Q_OS_WIN64
Q_OS_WIN - all supported versions of Windows. That is, if Q_OS_WIN32, Q_OS_WIN64 or Q_OS_WINCE is defined.
Q_OS_WINCE
Q_OS_WINPHONE
Q_OS_WINRT

More details in documentation of QtGlobal

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