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I have a simple foundation tool that exports every frame of a movie as a .tiff file. Here is the relevant code:

NSString* movieLoc = [NSString stringWithCString:argv[1]];
QTMovie *sourceMovie = [QTMovie movieWithFile:movieLoc error:nil];
int i=0;

while (QTTimeCompare([sourceMovie currentTime], [sourceMovie duration]) != NSOrderedSame) {
    // save image of movie to disk  
    NSAutoreleasePool *arp = [[NSAutoreleasePool alloc] init];

    NSString *filePath = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"/somelocation_%d.tiff", i++];
    NSData *currentImageData = [[sourceMovie currentFrameImage] TIFFRepresentation];
    [currentImageData writeToFile:filePath atomically:NO];
    NSLog(@"%@", filePath);

    [sourceMovie stepForward];
    [arp release];
}

[pool drain];
return 0;

As you can see, we create and destroy an autoreleasepool with every run through the loop, which should dispose of the various autoreleased objects created each run.

However, over the course of stepping through a movie, memory usage gradually increases. Instruments is not detecting any memory leaks per se, but the object trace shows certain General Data blocks to be increasing in size.

[Edited out reference to slowdown as it doesn't seem to be as much of a problem as I thought.]

Edit: let's knock out some parts of the code inside the loop & see what we find out...

Test 1

while (banana) {
    NSAutoreleasePool *arp = [[NSAutoreleasePool alloc] init];
    NSString *filePath = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"/somelocation_%d.tiff", i++];
    NSLog(@"%@", filePath);

    [sourceMovie stepForward];
    [arp release];
}

Here we simply loop over the whole movie, creating the filename and logging it.

Memory usage: stable 15MB for the duration.

Test 2

while (banana) {
    NSAutoreleasePool *arp = [[NSAutoreleasePool alloc] init];
    NSImage *image = [sourceMovie currentFrameImage];

    [sourceMovie stepForward];
    [arp release];
}

Here we add back in the creation of the NSImage from the current frame.

Memory usage: gradually increases. RSIZE is at 60MB by frame 200; 75MB by f300.

Test 3

while (banana) {
    NSAutoreleasePool *arp = [[NSAutoreleasePool alloc] init];
    NSImage *image = [sourceMovie currentFrameImage];
    NSData *imageData = [image TIFFRepresentation];

    [sourceMovie stepForward];
    [arp release];
}

We've added back in the creation of an NSData object from the NSImage.

Memory usage: gradually increases. 62MB at f200; 75MB at f300. In other words, largely identical.

My guess is it’s a slight memory leak in the underlying system QTMovie uses when currentFrameImage is invoked.

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Autorelease pools themselves shouldn't be any problem; it's deallocated at [arp release]; you're not using [arp autorelease]. Have you tried Instruments to directly see what is leaking? –  Yuji Jun 17 '10 at 15:36
    
Thanks Yuji, you're right, of course. I'll edit the question to remove that idea! Instruments shows no memory leaks per se but various "GeneralBlock"s are gradually increasing in memory. Since the code appears "correct" from a retain-release standpoint at least, I'm wondering if this may simply be something that occurs when you stepForward through a QTMovie very many times. –  Benji XVI Jun 17 '10 at 16:10
    
Some form of caching, for instance. Or an internal leak that I'm not likely to have much control over but which someone might know about. –  Benji XVI Jun 17 '10 at 16:14
1  
I ran the same program here; indeed there seems to be a pile-up of objects inside QTKit. Weird... –  Yuji Jun 17 '10 at 16:24
    
Thanks for the verification Yuji. I've run into a number of Very Strange Behaviours with QTKit (and threading) over the past day and as always it only takes a tiny bit of independent confirmation to hugely reduce the resulting desire to stab and maim! –  Benji XVI Jun 17 '10 at 17:23

3 Answers 3

The easiest way to find a memory leak is to run your program under a profiler. Xcode includes excellent profiling tools, the one you need is under Run->Start with Performance Tool->Leaks. It is pretty simple to use, too.

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Thanks for the tip. No leaks are being found, though the object allocation trace appears to be growing in some parts, I have absolutely no clue where when it comes to interpreting long lists of calls from deep inside QuickTime, for instance! –  Benji XVI Jun 17 '10 at 16:02
    
I mean, if there was a classic leak, caused by incorrect memory management, we would expect it to be obvious in the code here, wouldn't we, what with it being so simple. So I was really wondering if there was some deeper behaviour, originally perhaps related to ARPs, but also maybe QTMovie behaviour, that someone could shed light on! That latter one is quite the specialized request, now I come to think of it :) –  Benji XVI Jun 17 '10 at 16:17

Had the same issue. Try a local autorelease pool within the loop. This helped in my case. See here: http://developer.apple.com/library/mac/#documentation/Cocoa/Conceptual/MemoryMgmt/Articles/mmAutoreleasePools.html

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1  
Thanks – interesting to hear that helped you. However, all the code examples above already use local autorelease pools in their loops...? –  Benji XVI Jan 6 '12 at 10:40

This does indeed look like a memory leak internal to QTKit.

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PS if anyone has a better answer, I will gladly accept it instead of this lousy one! –  Benji XVI Jun 30 '10 at 21:27

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