Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have a Public Static Class and I am trying to access appsettings from my app.config file in C# and I get the above error

public static class employee
{
NameValueCollection appSetting = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings;    

}

How do I get this to work? PS: I pasted just a few lines of code.

thanks

share|improve this question
    
make NameValueCollection static.. – Srinivas Reddy Thatiparthy Jun 17 '10 at 16:14
7  
Do you understand what static means? From your question, I don't think you do. You should perhaps re-familiarize yourself with it's definition, especially with regards to c# classes. See: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/98f28cdx(VS.71).aspx – i_am_jorf Jun 17 '10 at 16:15
4  
This has got to be my first time seeing a static employee class. – BoltClock Jun 17 '10 at 16:16
1  
@BoltClock has a very good point; are you sure you want your employee class to be static? You almost certainly don't want that behaviour. You'd probably be better off removing the static constraint from the class and the members. – John Weldon Jun 17 '10 at 16:18
6  
maybe it's a one man band? – Pharabus Jun 17 '10 at 16:19
up vote 50 down vote accepted

If the class is declared static, all of the members must be static too.

static NameValueCollection appSetting = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings;

Update

Important enough that I copied the comment here:

@BoltClock has a very good point; are you sure you want your employee class to be static? You almost certainly don't want that behaviour. You'd probably be better off removing the static constraint from the class and the members.

share|improve this answer
1  
is there any reason why we have to explicitly declare static class members as static .. if they have to be static why isn't each member assumed to be static, saves precious typing time. – Sherlock Mar 18 '13 at 20:29
2  
good question @Sherlock, to (approximately) quote Eric Lippert; it's probably because someone would have had to have prioritized and implemented that behaviour... :) – John Weldon Mar 18 '13 at 21:14

It is not legal to declare an instance member in a static class. Static class's cannot be instantiated hence it makes no sense to have an instance members (they'd never be accessible).

share|improve this answer

It says what it means:

make your class non-static:

public class employee
{
  NameValueCollection appSetting = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings;    
}

or the member static:

public static class employee
{
  static NameValueCollection appSetting = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings;    
}
share|improve this answer

Have you tried using the 'static' storage class similar to?:

public static class employee
{
    static NameValueCollection appSetting = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings;    
}
share|improve this answer

As John Weldon said all members must be static in a static class. Try

public static class employee
{
     static NameValueCollection appSetting = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings;    

}
share|improve this answer
public static class Employee
{
    public static string SomeSetting
    {
        get 
        {
            return ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["SomeSetting"];    
        }
    }
}

Declare the property as static, as well. Also, Don't bother storing a private reference to ConfigurationManager.AppSettings. ConfigurationManager is already a static class.

If you feel that you must store a reference to appsettings, try

public static class Employee
{
    private static NameValueCollection _appSettings=ConfigurationManager.AppSettings;

    public static NameValueCollection AppSettings { get { return _appSettings; } }

}

It's good form to always give an explicit access specifier (private, public, etc) even though the default is private.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.