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sql = """
        INSERT INTO [SCHOOLINFO] 
        VALUES(
            '""" + self.accountNo + """', 
            '""" + self.altName + """',
            '""" + self.address1 + """',
            '""" + self.address2 + """',
            '""" + self.city + """',
            '""" + self.state + """',
            '""" + self.zipCode + """',
            '""" + self.phone1 + """',
            '""" + self.phone2 + """',
            '""" + self.fax + """',
            '""" + self.contactName + """',
            '""" + self.contactEmail + """',
            '""" + self.prize_id + """',
            '""" + self.shipping + """',
            '""" + self.chairTempPass + """',
            '""" + self.studentCount + """'
        )
    """;

I have the following code and Python keeps throwing the error that it cannon concatenate strings and nonetype objects. The thing is I have verified every variable here is in fact a string and is not null. I have been stuck on this for quite some time today, and any help would be greatly appreciated.

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There's probably a better (and safer!) way of doing this. What library are you passing this sql to? MySQLdb? –  Eric Palakovich Carr Jun 17 '10 at 17:58
3  
requisite xkcd.com/327 for a school related sql injection attack –  Stephen Jun 17 '10 at 18:00
    
This somehow reminds me of this XKCD comic (xkcd.com/327), but I hope the OP sanitizes his input. –  Mad Scientist Jun 17 '10 at 18:01

5 Answers 5

Use bind variables instead. Here's the spec for working with DBs in Python: PEP 249: Python Database API Specification v2.0.

UPDATE: Based on the docs for pymssql, you need something like:

sql = """
    INSERT INTO [SCHOOLINFO] 
    VALUES(
        %s, %s, %s, %s, %s, %s, %s, %s, %s, %s, %s, %s, %d, %s, %s, %d
    )"""
cur.execute(sql, self.accountNo, self.altName, self.address1, self.address2, self.city, self.state, self.zipCode, self.phone1, self.phone2, self.fax, self.contactName, self.contactEmail, self.prize_id, self.shipping, self.chairTempPass, self.studentCount)
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Ha yes I do sanitize my input. These vars all come from a previous db which was of course already sanitized. I am using pymssql, because the the people I am working with do not like MySQL and PHP :( –  Chase Higgins Jun 17 '10 at 18:27
1  
My suggestion wasn't security-related. Rewriting this to use bind variables (assuming pymssql does its job) will result in faster execution and get rid of weird string concatenation errors like the one you posted. –  Hank Gay Jun 17 '10 at 18:37
    
I am looking at these bind variables but I really do not see how I am going to use these in this code.. These variables contain information from the database which I am inserting into another, not making comparisons.. –  Chase Higgins Jun 17 '10 at 18:49
    
Here's some docs to help you get started with pymssql and as an aside: you have a trailing semicolon in your example code, but you don't end lines with semicolons in Python. –  Hank Gay Jun 17 '10 at 19:03

All these answers so far focus not on your problem but on what is right to do. Yes, yes - bind variables is better and safer. And yes, using % for formatting is faster and likely better.

But on your question what gives you that error - it must be that one of the values is None at some point, there is no other explanation. Just put a debug print in front of that, something like:

for v in 'accountNo altName address1 address2 city state zipCode phone1 phone2 fax contactName contactEmail prize_id shipping chairTempPass studentCount'.split():
    if getattr(self, v) is None:
        print 'PANIC: %s is None' % v

I bet it will print something at some point ;-)

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Composing the SQL query like this is very dangerous, especially due to sql-injection

If using MySqldb a better alternative would be like this:

db.query("INSERT INTO [SCHOOLINFO] VALUES(%s, %s, %s, %s, %s, %s, %s, %s, %s, %s, %s, %s, %s, %s, %s, %s)",
[self.accountNo, self.altName, self.address1, self.address2, self.city, self.state, self.zipCode, self.phone1, self.phone2, self.fax, self.contactName, self.contactEmail, self.prize_id, self.shipping, self.chairTempPass, self.studentCount])
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I'm going to assume you're using a library like MySQLdb. The best way to handle these kind of statements is like so:

import _mysql

db = _mysql.connect("localhost","user","password","database_name")
cursor = db.cursor()

sql = """
    INSERT INTO [SCHOOLINFO] 
    VALUES(%s, %s, %s, %s, %s, %s, %s, %s, %s, %s, %s, %s, %s, %s, %s, %s)
"""
cursor.execute(sql, [self.accountNo, self.altName, self.address1, \
                     self.address2, self.city, self.state, self.zipCode, \
                     self.phone1, self.phone2, self.fax, self.contactName, \
                     self.contactEmail, self.prize_id, self.shipping, \
                     self.chairTempPass, self.studentCount])

This way the database library handles properly entering the values in the INSERT query. It'll even make None values be entered as NULL into the new row. Plus the original way you were doing it was pretty susceptible to SQL injection attacks.

If you aren't using mysql, your library probably has similar functionality.

EDIT -

If you're connecting to a SQL Server database, use the pyodbc library. You can get it at http://code.google.com/p/pyodbc/. Here's what the code would look like:

import pyodbc

conn = pyodbc.connect('DRIVER={SQL Server};SERVER=localhost;DATABASE=database_name;UID=user;PWD=password')
cursor = conn.cursor()

sql = """
    INSERT INTO [SCHOOLINFO] 
    VALUES(?, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?)
"""
cursor.execute(sql, self.accountNo, self.altName, self.address1, \
                     self.address2, self.city, self.state, self.zipCode, \
                     self.phone1, self.phone2, self.fax, self.contactName, \
                     self.contactEmail, self.prize_id, self.shipping, \
                     self.chairTempPass, self.studentCount)
conn.commit()
share|improve this answer
    
The mssql library doesn't like it in this format. :( –  Chase Higgins Jun 17 '10 at 18:56
    
Ah, please see my edit then. –  Eric Palakovich Carr Jun 17 '10 at 19:08
1  
Ok I will give this one a go. Thank you so much for all your help guys! –  Chase Higgins Jun 17 '10 at 19:10

You should not be concatenating values into SQL statements, because doing so leaves you wide open to (accidental or deliberate) SQL injection. Instead, you should be passing SQL statements with parameter markers where the values should go, and letting your database connector insert the values into the correct places.

All database connectors support this in some form. For example, psycopg2 (a PostgreSQL connector which follows the Python DB API) would accept something like this:

cursor.execute( "insert into schoolinfo (accountno, altname) values (%s, %s)",
    (self.accountNo, self.altName))

A side benefit of doing it this way: Values that are not strings (e.g. None) will be converted automatically and you won't get the error you described in your question.

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