Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'd like to convert an array to a set in Java. There are some obvious ways of doing this (i.e. with a loop) but I would like something a bit neater, something like:

java.util.Arrays.asList(Object[] a);

Any ideas?

share|improve this question
2  
What, you think the Set constructor that takes a Collection or .addAll method doesn't do a loop? –  Paul Tomblin Jun 17 '10 at 18:29
16  
No, it's just that I would prefer not to write out the whole loop in my code (it's really ugly!). –  Peter Jun 17 '10 at 18:32
1  
Write your own:) –  Petar Minchev Jun 17 '10 at 18:38
    
possible duplicate of initialize java HashSet values by construction –  datakey May 22 at 10:57

8 Answers 8

up vote 320 down vote accepted

Like this:

Set<T> mySet = new HashSet<T>(Arrays.asList(someArray));
share|improve this answer
8  
+1 for generics. –  JavadocMD Jun 17 '10 at 18:29
4  
I would leave out the last <T>, otherwise nice oneliner! –  despot Jul 6 '11 at 10:06
2  
this is highly innefient. Why create a List to iterate over it to create a Set? Just iterate over the array yourself. –  dataoz Mar 2 '12 at 17:56
71  
@dataoz: Wrong; Arrays.asList is O(1). –  SLaks Jun 8 '12 at 18:34
14  
Note that if you use this method on an array of primitives such as int[] it will return a List<int[]> so you should use wrapper classes to get the intended behavior. –  T. Markle Sep 22 '12 at 4:53
Set<T> mySet = new HashSet<T>();
Collections.addAll(mySet, myArray);

That's Collections.addAll(java.util.Collection, T...) from jdk1.6.

share|improve this answer
3  
You can do that with java.util.Collections.addAll. Plus, I wouldn't recommend Commons Collections anymore, what with it not being generified and Guava existing . –  ColinD Jun 17 '10 at 18:40
    
Yeah I noticed that and altered the above before I read your comment. :) –  JavadocMD Jun 17 '10 at 18:42
11  
+1 for being more efficient than SLaks's answer, even though it's not a one-liner. –  Adrian Apr 10 '12 at 22:17
    
@Adrian I question that. I think addAll will be O(n). –  Steve Powell Oct 22 '13 at 15:35
3  
Per the Collections.addAll() javadoc (Java 6): "The behavior of this convenience method is identical to that of c.addAll(Arrays.asList(elements)), but this method is likely to run significantly faster under most implementations." –  Bert F Feb 3 at 22:50

With Guava you can do:

T[] array = ...
Set<T> set = Sets.newHashSet(array);
share|improve this answer
8  
also ImmutableSet.copyOf(array). (I like to point out also's, I guess.) –  Kevin Bourrillion Jun 17 '10 at 21:26
    
I love Guava. It's API is concise and epressive. –  oschrenk Dec 11 '11 at 20:41
    
+1 / makes for more readable and succinct code than java's collections. –  Jubbat Jan 7 '12 at 21:22
    
+1. I agree with Jubbat. The accepted answer is correct if limited to standard library, but this is far more elegant. Worth including Guava in your project. –  Chet Mar 27 '13 at 14:59

After you do Arrays.asList(array) you can execute Set set = new HashSet(list);

Here is a sample method, you can write:

public <T> Set<T> GetSetFromArray(T[] array) {
    return new HashSet<T>(Arrays.asList(array));
}
share|improve this answer
    
I was hoping for a method that returns a set directly from an array, does one exist? –  Peter Jun 17 '10 at 18:31
    
Honestly, I doubt:) –  Petar Minchev Jun 17 '10 at 18:31
1  
You can write your own, if you are so eager:) –  Petar Minchev Jun 17 '10 at 18:34
    
I know you meant Arrays.asList(array) instead of Arrays.List(array) in the first line –  dimitrisli Oct 25 '11 at 21:24
    
@dimitrisli - Thanks, of course:) –  Petar Minchev Oct 26 '11 at 6:20

Quickly : you can do :

// Fixed-size list
List list = Arrays.asList(array);

// Growable list
list = new LinkedList(Arrays.asList(array));

// Duplicate elements are discarded
Set set = new HashSet(Arrays.asList(array));

and to reverse

// Create an array containing the elements in a list
Object[] objectArray = list.toArray();
MyClass[] array = (MyClass[])list.toArray(new MyClass[list.size()]);

// Create an array containing the elements in a set
objectArray = set.toArray();
array = (MyClass[])set.toArray(new MyClass[set.size()]);
share|improve this answer
    
the most comprehensive answer! –  davidgale Oct 2 '13 at 18:37

In GS Collections, the following will work:

Set<Integer> set1 = Sets.mutable.of(1, 2, 3, 4, 5);
Set<Integer> set2 = Sets.mutable.of(new Integer[]{1, 2, 3, 4, 5});
MutableSet<Integer> mutableSet = Sets.mutable.of(1, 2, 3, 4, 5);
ImmutableSet<Integer> immutableSet = Sets.immutable.of(1, 2, 3, 4, 5);

Set<Integer> unmodifiableSet = Sets.mutable.of(1, 2, 3, 4, 5).asUnmodifiable();
Set<Integer> synchronizedSet = Sets.mutable.of(1, 2, 3, 4, 5).asSynchronized();

Note: I am a developer on GS Collections

share|improve this answer

Sometime using some standard libraries helps a lot. Try to look at the Apache Commons Collections. In this case your problems is simply transformed to something like this

String[] keys = {"blah", "blahblah"}
Set<String> myEmptySet = new HashSet<String>();
CollectionUtils.addAll(pythonKeywordSet, keys);

And here is the CollectionsUtils javadoc

share|improve this answer
2  
user might not use apache commons –  Adrian Jan 4 '12 at 17:17
    
if the user does not use apache commons, then that is his first mistake. –  Jeryl Cook Oct 4 '13 at 13:46

new HashSet<Object>(Arrays.asList(Object[] a));

But I think this would be more efficient:

final Set s = new HashSet<Object>();
for (Object o : a) { s.add(o); }
share|improve this answer
    
That wouldn't really be more efficient (at least not worth thinking about). –  ColinD Jun 17 '10 at 18:46
3  
With the constructor version, the initial capacity of the HashSet is set based on the size of the array, for instance. –  ColinD Jun 17 '10 at 18:55

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.