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Let's say I have a background worker like this:

private void backgroundWorker1_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
        {
             while(true)
             {
                  //Kill zombies
             }
        }

How can I make this background worker start and stop using a button on a WinForm?

share|improve this question
    
Hmm, for the answer you accepted, beware - you are worrying all about an effect that will only cause it not to stop an iteration or two later, but forgetting you are going to be BUSYING UP a whole processor just spinning! At least put a sleep in there. It will look like it's working but to great detriment. Some of the other answers solve all those problems they way you are 'supposed' to solve them. –  FastAl Jun 18 '10 at 15:53

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted
private bool _performKilling;

private void backgroundWorker1_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
{
     while(true)
     {
         if (_performKilling)
         {
             //Kill zombies
         }
     }
}

private void StartKilling()
{
    _performKilling = true;
}

private void StopAllThatKilling()
{
    _performKilling = false;
}

Now call StartKilling and StopAllThatKilling from a button click handler or any other appropriate location.

You could start to worry about thread safety here, given that the _performKilling field is updated and accessed on different threads. However, accessing (and updating) a bool is an atomic operation, so it should require no extra locking mechanisms.

Update
Following the discussion around atomicity, freshness of data and order of access, here is an updated code sample that will address those issues by adding a lock around all read and write operations of the flag:

private bool _performKilling;
private object _lock = new object();

private void backgroundWorker1_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
{
     while(true)
     {
         bool runLoop;
         lock (_lock)
         {
             runLoop = _performKilling;
         }
         if (runLoop)
         {
             //Kill zombies
         }
     }
}

private void StartKilling()
{
    lock (_lock)
    {
        _performKilling = true;
    }
}

private void StopAllThatKilling()
{
    lock (_lock)
    {
        _performKilling = false;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Works just fine :D –  sooprise Jun 17 '10 at 21:36
    
"Accessing and updating a bool is an atomic operation". Is this because of the memory barrier? –  Josh Smeaton Jun 17 '10 at 21:43
    
No, atomic means that the value true or false will be written in one go. A memory barrier dictates the order that writes or reads of the value are seen by another thread. There's nothing which says that the value written to _performKilling will ever be visible in another thread without such a mechanism. Atomicity means that the value read will always either be true or false, it does not mean that the background thread will ever see the most recently written value. –  Pete Kirkham Jun 17 '10 at 21:48
1  
They are atomic but to be on the safe side I would likely mark it volatile. This tight loop doesn't take breather either. It's constantly building data as fast as it can go, I wouldn't post any invalidate calls from this loop for instance. –  Steve Sheldon Jun 17 '10 at 21:51
    
Definitely mark the flag volatile otherwise you might see heisenbugs. –  spender Jun 17 '10 at 22:53

Maybe you can use a manualresetevent like this, I didn't debug this but worth a shot. If it works you won't be having the thread spin its wheels while it's waiting

ManualResetEvent run = new ManualResetEvent(true);

private void backgroundWorker1_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e) 
{ 
     while(run.WaitOne()) 
     { 
         //Kill zombies 
     } 
} 

private void War() 
{ 
    run.Set();
} 

private void Peace() 
{ 
    run.Reset();
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Its great to see another soul that really understands .NET threading. ;) I think the use of a WaitHandle is always the better choice in these situations, as they intrinsically take care of atomicity and other multithreading issues for you (assuming you choose the right kind of WaitHandle). –  jrista Jun 18 '10 at 5:18
    
while (true) { if (run.WaitOne()) { } }? Seems a little redundant, doesn't it? Why not while (run.WaitOne()) { }? –  Dan Tao Jun 18 '10 at 5:22
    
It is indeed, I thought that myself after posting, i'll update it –  Steve Sheldon Jun 18 '10 at 5:26

Use the CancelAsync method.

backgroundworker1.CancelAsync();

In your loop inside the worker thread.

if (backgroundWorker.CancellationPending) return;

This doesn't happen immediately.

share|improve this answer
4  
+1: I don't get why everybody's saying to check while (_someCustomBoolean) when the BackgroundWorker class already has this functionality built in. –  Dan Tao Jun 18 '10 at 5:19
    
Once cancellation pending is set, I think the general protocol is for the background worker to stop and complete. In this situation I believe the questions was asking for a way to start and stop. The background worker can trip you up as well. If you use its oncompleted event, this gets posted through the .net generic ThreadPool, I have seen this deadlock before depending on what else gets thrown on there. –  Steve Sheldon Mar 12 '12 at 19:56

By stop do you really mean stop or do you mean pause? If you mean stop, then this is a piece of cake. Create a button click event handler for the button you want to be responsible for starting the background worker and a button click event handler for the one responsible for stopping it. On your start button, make a call to the background worker method that fires the do_work event. Something like this:

private void startButton_Click(System.Object sender, 
    System.EventArgs e)
{
    // Start the asynchronous operation.
    backgroundWorker1.RunWorkerAsync();
}

On your stop button, make a call to the method that sets the background worker's CancellationPending to true, like this:

private void cancelAsyncButton_Click(System.Object sender, 
    System.EventArgs e)
{   
    // Cancel the asynchronous operation.
    this.backgroundWorker1.CancelAsync();
}

Now don't forget to check for the CancelationPending flag inside your background worker's doWork. Something like this:

   private void KillZombies(BackgroundWorker worker, DoWorkEventArgs e)
   {
        while (true)
        {
            if (worker.CancellationPending)
           {   
              e.Cancel = true;
           }
        }
   }

And your doWork method:

private void backgroundWorker1_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
        {
             BackgroundWorker worker = sender as BackgroundWorker;
             KillZombies(worker, e);
        }

I hope this can steer you in the right direction. Some further readings:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/b2zk6580(v=VS.90).aspx

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.componentmodel.backgroundworker.aspx

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/waw3xexc.aspx

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I haven't tested this, I have code somewhere that I'll have to see exactly what I did, but something like this is an adaptation of Fredrik's answer:

private bool _performKilling;
private object _lockObject = new object();

private void backgroundWorker1_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
{
     while(true)
     {

         if (_performKilling)
         {
             //Kill zombies
         }
         else
         { //We pause until we are woken up so as not to consume cycles
             Monitor.Wait(_lockObject);
         }
     }
}

private void StartKilling()
{
    _performKilling = true;
    Monitor.Pulse(_lockObject);
}

private void StopAllThatKilling()
{
    _performKilling = false;
]
share|improve this answer
    
Ah, of course; nice solution. I must be tired not coming up with it from the start myself ;) –  Fredrik Mörk Jun 17 '10 at 21:30

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