Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'd like to make an ajax call as a POST, it's going to go to my servlet. I want to send parameterized data, like the following:

var mydata = 'param0=some_text&param1=some_more_text';

I supply this as the 'data' parameter of my jquery ajax() call. So this should be inserted in the body of the POST, right? (I mean, not appended to my 'mysite/save' url?):

$.ajax({
    url: 'mysite/save',
    type: 'POST',
    data: mydata
});

it appears to work correctly. In my servlet, I am just dumping all received parameters, and I see them all come through nicely:

private void printParams(HttpServletRequest req) {
    Enumeration paramNames = req.getParameterNames();
    while (paramNames.hasMoreElements()) { 
        // print each param key/val here.
    }
}

also, I should url encode my data string manually before use, right? Like:

var mydata = 'param0=' + urlencode('hi there!');
mydata += '&param1=' + urlencode('blah blah');
mydata += '%param2=' + urlencode('we get it');

Thanks!

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted

An easier way is to provide the data property as an object, like this:

$.ajax({
  url: 'mysite/save',
  type: 'POST',
  data: { param0:'hi there!', param1:'blah blah', param2:'we get it' }
});

Otherwise, yes you should encode it, as anything with an & for example would screw things up very quickly. Providing it as an object is a much cleaer/simpler approach though, in my opinion anyway.

You can also space it out, and retrieve properties from other places inline, like this:

$.ajax({
  url: 'mysite/save',
  type: 'POST',
  data: { 
          param0: $('#textbox0').val(), 
          param1: $('#textbox1').val(), 
          param2: $('#textbox2').val()
        }
});

Edit: If you're curious how jQuery does this encoding internally, it's using $.param() (which you can use directly as well) to encode the object to a string, called here, and the guts here.

share|improve this answer
    
Very cool, thanks. –  user246114 Jun 17 '10 at 22:41

If you have a form, you can also do var data = jQuery("#myForm").serialize(); which puts it in a form that jQuery.ajax can understand and use. Otherwise, use the object literal described in Nick's answer.

share|improve this answer

can this help you

function CallPageSync(url, data) {
    var response;
    $.ajax({
        async: false,
        url: url,
        data: data,
        timeout: 4000,
        success: function(result) {
            response = result;
        },
        error: function(XMLHttpRequest, textStatus, errorThrown) {
            response = "err--" + XMLHttpRequest.status + " -- " + XMLHttpRequest.statusText;
        }
    });
    return response;
}

and you can call it like

response = CallPageSync(checkPageURL, "un=" + username);
share|improve this answer
    
I think he wants to know how to build the data parameter and not how to use jQuery.ajax. –  Vivin Paliath Jun 17 '10 at 22:22
    
just write it as you write it in URL : "ID=10&Name=aaaaa" –  Amr Badawy Jun 17 '10 at 22:33

you don't need to URL encode POST vars. however if you are interacting with a db you will want to make sure your vars are injection attack protected.

What you have will work, however as Vivin mentioned, if it's a form the best way to do it is via .serialize() I use this a LOT personally for all my form submissions (done via ajax).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.