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i have a list like this

["peter","1000","michell","2000","kelly","3000"]

and i would like to convert to

[("peter",1000),("michell", 2000),("kelly",3000)]

Please help. Thanks.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted
cnv :: [String] -> [(String, Integer)]
cnv [] = []
cnv (k:v:t) = (k, read v) : cnv t

If you want to handle odd-length just add cnv [x] = variant before last one

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1  
Can you explain this lines of code cnv (k:v:t) = (k, read v) : cnv t ? AFAIK, the k v t is a parameter from list k is the head and v is the tail and cnv t is next element as k. Is my understanding correct because previosuly i have function like this. convert :: [String] -> [(String, Integer)] convert [] = [] convert (x:y:xs) = (x, y)convert xs and why when i add :xs it is not working ? Are the k v t is represents a single element in list or whole list ? –  peterwkc Jun 18 '10 at 3:53
3  
Not quite: in k:v:t, k is the head, and v:t is the tail. Thus, k:v:t puts the first two items of the list into k and v and the remaining tail in t. Your code has two obvious problems: (a) (x,y) has type (String,String), not (String,Integer); and (b) there's no colon before convert xs. (You can't just do :xs, because you need [(String,Integer)] but xs has type [String].) Also, a formatting tip: indent lines with four blank spaces to get code blocks (or select your code and click the "101010" button), and surround code snippets with backticks (`...code...`). –  Antal S-Z Jun 18 '10 at 4:07
    
(x:xs) That means x is the head and remaining element is tail for xs. Thanks for your explanation. –  peterwkc Jun 18 '10 at 4:28
2  
@Antal S-Z is right. (k:v:t) equivalent to (k:(v:t)) because of declaration infixr 5 : in GHC.Types (as well data [] a = [] | a : [a] will tell you about meaning of (v:t) or []). –  ony Jun 18 '10 at 5:15
    
(or select your code and click the "101010" button), and surround code snippets with backticks (...code...). Any example. How to do that manually ? I don't understand what you say here. (k:v:t) equivalent to (k:(v:t)) because of declaration infixr 5 : in GHC.Types (as well data [] a = [] | a : [a] will tell you about meaning of (v:t) or []) –  peterwkc Jun 18 '10 at 6:43

ony's solution is a bit shorter, but here's a non-recursive version using splitEvery from the very handy split library:

cnv = map (\[name, amount] -> (name, read amount :: Int)) . splitEvery 2

The steps here are somewhat clearer (for me, at least) than in the recursive version.

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2  
This is definitely more natural. The split library doesn't get enough love. It's too bad, since it's incredibly useful. –  Antal S-Z Jun 18 '10 at 8:12

Exactly for a task like this I find it convenient to have a stride function to take every n-th element from the list:

stride _ [] = []
stride n (x:xs) = x : stride n (drop (n-1) xs)

It can be used to convert a list to pairs:

toPairs xs = zip (stride 2 xs) (stride 2 (drop 1 xs))

An example (note that the last element may be thrown away if it doesn't have pair):

ghci> stride 2 [1..5]
[1,3,5]
ghci> toPairs [1..7]
[(1,2),(3,4),(5,6)]

It can be even easily extended to triplets or longer tuples:

toTriplets xs = zip3 as bs cs
  where as = stride 3 xs
        bs = stride 3 $ drop 1 xs
        cs = stride 3 $ drop 2 xs

To perform conversion from String to integer in your example, you can map read function over the second stride:

let lst = ["peter","1000","michell","2000","kelly","3000"] in
zip (stride 2 lst) (map read . stride 2 . drop 1 $ lst) :: [(String,Int)]

which gives:

[("peter",1000),("michell",2000),("kelly",3000)]
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