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Is it possible to close a form while the constructor is executing (or simply to stop it showing at this stage)?

I have the following code:

public partial class MyForm : Form
{        
    public MyForm()
    {
        if (MyFunc())
        {
            this.Close();
        }
    }
}

Which throws an ObjectDisposedException in Main(), here:

    static void Main()
    {            
        ...

        // Following line errors
        Application.Run(new MyForm());
    }

I’ve tried checking the result of MyForm like this:

static void Main()
{            
    ...

    MyForm frm = new MyForm();
    if (frm != null)
    {
        // Following line errors
        Application.Run(frm);
    }
}

But that doesn’t seem to help. Can anyone tell me a way around this, please? Maybe a way to check the form to see if it still exists?

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What exception do you get? –  Arkain Jun 18 '10 at 7:42

8 Answers 8

up vote 10 down vote accepted

The only thing you could do it set a flag to close it in the constructor, and then closing it in the Shown event. Of course, if you're doing that, it makes sense to move the code to determine whether it should be closed there in the first place.

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Calling close from the constructor of the Form is not possible, as it will call Dispose on a Form that has not yet been created. To close the Form after construction, assign an anonymous event handler to the Load event that closes your Form before it is displayed for the first time:

public partial class MyForm : Form
{
    public MyForm()
    {
        if (ShouldClose())
        {
            Load += (s, e) => Close();
            return;
        }

        // ...
    }

    // ...
}
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4  
+1, just replace Shown with Load for no flicker and you have a winner –  Dialecticus Jun 4 '12 at 10:32
    
@Dialecticus: Thank you. Done! –  Christian Jun 5 '12 at 7:18

The following works well:

public partial class MyForm : Form
{        
    public MyForm()
    {
        if (MyFunc())
        {
            this.Shown += new EventHandler(MyForm_CloseOnStart);
        }
    }

    private void MyForm_CloseOnStart(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        this.Close();
    }
}
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When you call Close() on a form, internally it is disposing of the form and releasing any managed resources. When you do this:

Application.Run(new MyForm());

You'll likely get an ObjectDisposedException. What you need to do is set the Form's visibility through a property:

Application.Run(new MyForm() { Visible = false });

Just make sure you remove the call to Close() in the constructor, or even move the property assignment there too.

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Can you make MyFunc static? and then do something like:

static void Main() 
{             
    ... 
    if (MyForm.MyFunc())
    {
        Application.Run(new MyForm()); 
    }
} 

this would essentially give you the same control over whether the form is going to be constructed or not?

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Your form won't be opened from the constructor. What are you trying to achieve?

If you close this form then the code path will exit completely, leaving you with no obvious benefit (ie, Application.Run will exit). Someone else posted code about making the form hidden, seems more probable.

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I found adding a handler to the 'Load' event is better as this way the dialog is never displayed at all. With the 'Shown' event you might briefly see the dialog open and then close which may be confusing:

public partial class MyForm : Form
{        
    public MyForm()
    {
        if (MyFunc())
        {
            this.Load += MyForm_CloseOnStart;
        }
    }

    private void MyForm_CloseOnStart(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        this.Close();
    }
}
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I think it is not wise to close a form in the constructor. If you do this, users of your form wouldn't know whether to ShowDialog or not.

The following code would be quite normal use:

// in the parent form:
public void ShowMyForm()
{
    MyForm form = new MyForm();
    form.propertyA = ...;
    from.propertyB = ...;
    DialogResult dlgResult = form.ShowDialog(this);
    ProcessDialogResult(dlgResult);
}

You'll have to add special code to decide whether to ShowDialog and whether to Process the dialog result.

Besides are you sure that the properties will never influence whether the form is to be shown or not? Also after future changes?

During construction the form is not shown / opened yet. So I'm afraid Close() doesn't do what you expect.

The neat method is to do your checks in the Form_Load. Add the form load event handler and do your checks at that moment. Use the property DialogResult to indicate that you decided not to show the form.

private void FormMain_Load (object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    if (MyFunc())
    {
        this.DialogResult = System.Windows.Forms.DialogResult.Cancel;
        Close();
    }
}

The user of the code could check the result of the dialog:

// in the parent form:
public void ShowMyForm()
{
    MyForm form = new MyForm();
    form.propertyA = ...;
    from.propertyB = ...;
    DialogResult dlgResult = form.ShowDialog(this);
    switch (dlgResult)
    {
        case System.Windows.Forms.DialogResult.Cancel:
            ...
            break;
        case System.Windows.Forms.DialogResult.OK:
            ...
            break;
        // etc.
    }
}

However this won't work, because Close can only be called properly after Load is completed. So instead of calling Close(), you should BeginInvoke the Close() function, so the Close function will be called after loading is done:

The code to call Close() after loading is finished will be like follows:

private void FormMain_Load (object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    if (MyFunc())
    {
        CancelLoading();
    }
}

private delegate void InvokeDelegate();

private void CancelLoading()
{    // will cancel loading this form
    this.DialogResult = System.Windows.Forms.DialogResult.Cancel;
    this.BeginInvoke(new InvokeDelegate(CloseThisForm));
}

private void CloseThisForm()
{
    this.Close();
}

The nice thing is that during OnFormClosing and OnFormClosed you know exactly the status of the form: it is completely loaded, so you know what to do when closing.

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