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What will work faster? How strongly will it affect productivity?

$test = new Test();
$a1 = array();
$a2 = array();
$a3 = array();

$a1[1] = $test;
$a2['qwe'] = $test;
$a3[] = $test;
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i really don't understand your question, but i don't think there's a (noticable) performance difference … where should it be??? –  knittl Jun 18 '10 at 8:55
9  
sigh Write code that is the most understandable, works, and does what you want. If you are worried about performance, profile. Then decide how to "optimize". These "micro optimizations" are most always just a waste of time. –  user166390 Jun 18 '10 at 8:56
2  
Exactly. you can optimize later on, by using caches etc. The speed gain will be trivial, and understandability of the code affects how fast you can adapt it later so is more important. –  Tomasz Struczyński Jun 18 '10 at 9:00
    
I've turned the syntax around to the usual English word order. –  dmckee Jun 18 '10 at 15:47
2  
If you really want to measure the [programmer] productivity of this, picking any one at random will surely beat loosing a day or so spent on SO debating this... –  Wim Jun 18 '10 at 15:56

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

As no one answered, I've made some test

The code:

<?php

class O
{
}

$test = new O;
$a1 = array();
$a2 = array();
$a3 = array();

$start = microtime(true);
for ($k = 0; $k < 1000000; $k++)
    $a1[1] = $test;
$time[1] = microtime(true)-$start;

$start = microtime(true);
for ($k = 0; $k < 1000000; $k++)
    $a2['qwe'] = $test;
$time[2] = microtime(true)-$start;

$start = microtime(true);
for ($k = 0; $k < 1000000; $k++)
    $a3[] = $test;
$time[3] = microtime(true)-$start;


print_r($time);

The results:

Array ( [1] => 0.18384599685669 [2] => 0.19556093215942 [3] => 0.3099570274353 )

Third one is the slowest one, but mostly because it actually allocates million objects and first two overwrite object on each pass. When I modified first to $a1[$k] = $test;, the results were similar (although don't run it on a low memory limit, say below 128MB).

The conclusion: as we said before, it doesn't really matter. Focus on writing code which is readable and utilizes design patterns, not on some minor optimizations.

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1  
Pay attention, I assigned a MILLION objects (though small) on each test, and it took so little time. –  Tomasz Struczyński Jun 18 '10 at 9:13
1  
It actually depend on the number of iterations. One solution could be really faster on a $k < 100 for instance (I used to make optimizations once). –  Boris Delormas Jun 18 '10 at 9:16
1  
Yeah, but looking at the overall time of this operation... In 99.99% cases it doesn't really matter. –  Tomasz Struczyński Jun 18 '10 at 9:24
    
and in the other 0.01%, it really doesn't matter –  Wim Jun 18 '10 at 16:01

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