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I would like to know how I can find the length of an integer in C.

For instance:

  • 1 => 1
  • 25 => 2
  • 12512 => 5
  • 0 => 1

and so on.

How can I do this in C?

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1  
What's the definition of "length" if the integer is 0? Negative? –  KennyTM Jun 18 '10 at 9:11
16  
I like the "is this even possible in C" part.. –  Blindy Jun 18 '10 at 9:17
1  
See stackoverflow.com/questions/679602/…. It's almost a duplicate, but not exact as it's a .NET question. –  ChrisF Jun 18 '10 at 9:36
7  
the right question is not the length of the integer, but which is the minimal number of decimal digits needed to represent that number (held into a C int). log10 is your friend: log10(10000) = 4, +1 the number of digits (log10 must be truncated)... if the num is neg, you need one more for the - symbol, if you want to count it, and log10(-num) (since log of a neg number is "problematic". –  ShinTakezou Jun 18 '10 at 9:41
1  
Hmm. Experiment shows that log10(10**n) yields the exact value for powers of 10 from 1 to 2**19, at least with gcc and glibc. But I wouldn't count on it for all implementations. (** denotes exponentiation; there's no such operator in C.) –  Keith Thompson Aug 29 '11 at 6:02

16 Answers 16

up vote 43 down vote accepted

Why not just take the base-10 log of the absolute value of the number, round it down, and add one? This works for positive and negative numbers that aren't 0, and avoids having to use any string conversion functions.

The log10, abs, and floor functions are provided by math.h. For example:

int nDigits = floor(log10(abs(the_integer))) + 1;

You should wrap this in a clause ensuring that the_integer != 0, since log10(0) returns -HUGE_VAL according to man 3 log.

Additionally, you may want to add one to the final result if the input is negative, if you're interested in the length of the number including its negative sign.


N.B. The floating-point nature of the calculations involved in this method may cause it to be slower than a more direct approach. See the comments for Kangkan's answer for some discussion of efficiency.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually you should use floor and add 1 instead. Math.Ceil(Math.Log(99)) = 2 but Math.Ceil(Math.Log(10)) = 1. Math.Floor(Math.Log(99)) + 1 = 2 and Math.Floor(Math.Log(10)) = 2 –  Sani Huttunen Jun 18 '10 at 9:20
    
The question isn't entirely clear on the definition of length (so you could possibly have thought 'number of digits excluding leading zeros'), but I would expect 0 and -1 to return 1 and 2 as the length of their character representation rather than -2147483648 and 1. –  Pete Kirkham Jun 18 '10 at 9:40
    
@Pete Thanks for reminding me about log's domain limitation and the negative number case - I've edited my answer. –  Jordan Lewis Jun 18 '10 at 9:51
2  
+1. Every programmer should know basic math. –  el.pescado Jun 18 '10 at 10:38
1  
+1 nice & short - this is my preferred answer, even if it's the slowest - after all, the speed difference isn't huge and this kind of code is very unlikely to be a perf. bottleneck anyhow. –  Eamon Nerbonne Jun 18 '10 at 13:20

If you're interested in a fast and very simple solution, the following might be quickest (this depends on the probability distribution of the numbers in question):

int lenHelper(unsigned x) {
    if(x>=1000000000) return 10;
    if(x>=100000000) return 9;
    if(x>=10000000) return 8;
    if(x>=1000000) return 7;
    if(x>=100000) return 6;
    if(x>=10000) return 5;
    if(x>=1000) return 4;
    if(x>=100) return 3;
    if(x>=10) return 2;
    return 1;
}

int printLen(int x) {
    return x<0 ? lenHelper(-x)+1 : lenHelper(x);
}

While it might not win prizes for the most ingenious solution, it's trivial to understand and also trivial to execute - so it's fast.

On a Q6600 using MSC I benchmarked this with the following loop:

int res=0;
for(int i=-2000000000;i<2000000000;i+=200) res+=printLen(i);

This solution takes 0.062s, the second-fastest solution by Pete Kirkham using a smart-logarithm approach takes 0.115s - almost twice as long. However, for numbers around 10000 and below, the smart-log is faster.

At the expense of some clarity, you can more reliably beat smart-log (at least, on a Q6600):

int lenHelper(unsigned x) { 
    // this is either a fun exercise in optimization 
    // or it's extremely premature optimization.
    if(x>=100000) {
        if(x>=10000000) {
            if(x>=1000000000) return 10;
            if(x>=100000000) return 9;
            return 8;
        }
        if(x>=1000000) return 7;
        return 6;
    } else {
        if(x>=1000) {
            if(x>=10000) return 5;
            return 4;
        } else {
            if(x>=100) return 3;
            if(x>=10) return 2;
            return 1;
        }
    }
}

This solution is still 0.062s on large numbers, and degrades to around 0.09s for smaller numbers - faster in both cases than the smart-log approach. (gcc makes faster code; 0.052 for this solution and 0.09s for the smart-log approach).

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6  
I shudder to think what the second version would look like written entirely with the ternary operator... –  Eamon Nerbonne Jun 18 '10 at 13:22
2  
+1 - Great answer! –  Alex Reynolds May 19 '13 at 7:00
    
If this was used to munch through long lists of numbers the amount of branching code would cause havoc with the CPUs branch prediction and not produce the fastest execution Im afraid. –  Lloyd Crawley Oct 23 '13 at 8:52
    
In my benchmark it's still the fastest solution - note that all other integral solutions also require several branches, and the only real alternative is an int-to-double conversion with a floating point log (which as it turns out isn't cheap either). –  Eamon Nerbonne Oct 23 '13 at 16:15
1  
@earthdan: that solution is fine, but quite slow due to the divisions. It also always uses more branches that the second version of this code, and more on average than the first solution posted here. Also, that solution is quite clever (in a bad way) in that the reason it works isn't entirely obvious. If you want a short+obvious solution, use stackoverflow.com/a/3068412/42921; if you want a fast and obvious solution use this. Can't imagine the use case for stackoverflow.com/a/6655759/2382629 (though it's of course a fun intellectual exercise!) –  Eamon Nerbonne Mar 17 at 12:55
int get_int_len (int value){
  int l=1;
  while(value>9){ l++; value/=10; }
  return l;
}

and second one will work for negative numbers too:

int get_int_len_with_negative_too (int value){
  int l=!value;
  while(value){ l++; value/=10; }
  return l;
}
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2  
I like this. No temporary character buffers with assumptions about the size. –  Noufal Ibrahim Jun 18 '10 at 9:13
    
Quick and elegant, however, this won't work for negative numbers. Don't know if that's a concern for the question poster –  Jamie Wong Jun 18 '10 at 9:16
    
my answer is similar but works for negative numbers –  Graphics Noob Jun 18 '10 at 9:19
1  
The second version won't work for 0. –  Eamon Nerbonne Jun 18 '10 at 13:31
1  
it will. give it a try. it will return 1 –  zed_0xff Jun 19 '10 at 10:10

You can write a function like this:

unsigned numDigits(const unsigned n) {
    if (n < 10) return 1;
    return 1 + numDigits(n / 10);
}
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4  
This is unnecessarily inefficient - why use up to around 18 recursive function calls when you can do it with one call to log10? –  Jordan Lewis Jun 18 '10 at 9:27
6  
@Jordan Lewis calling this 20 million times takes 1.8s on my netbook; calling your code takes 6.6 seconds (gcc -O3 for both). One call to log10 is very much slower than all the recursive calls this makes. –  Pete Kirkham Jun 18 '10 at 9:46
2  
@Pete I see .001s for the log10 version and .44s for the recursive version on my Intel i7, for 20 million times with -O3. –  Jordan Lewis Jun 18 '10 at 9:59
1  
@Jordan I added if ( x < 0 ) return 1 + printed_length ( -x ); to the start of it –  Pete Kirkham Jun 18 '10 at 10:46
4  
@Pete I must have made a mistake causing the compiler to optimize out the actual calls before. I now observe a gap like yours - .26 seconds for the recursive version, and 1.68 seconds for the floating point arithmetic version. Interesting! –  Jordan Lewis Jun 18 '10 at 11:07

length of n:

length =  ( i==0 ) ? 1 : (int)log10(n)+1;
share|improve this answer
    
You should probably avoid rounding via casting and instead go or a more explicit (a.k.a. portable and consistent) rounding approach. –  Chris Lutz Jun 18 '10 at 9:18
    
how is casting implemented? how a function like floor can be implemented? (we are assuming a processor with ieee in hardware, or through a math coprocessor, or the availability of software function to perform the same function normally present on fp-capable processors)... at the end (int) is portable and consistent in most cases (I dare say, all the cases we normally care of) –  ShinTakezou Jun 18 '10 at 9:48
    
As mentioned in other posts, this will fail when n = 0 –  Jamie Wong Jun 18 '10 at 9:59
    
@Lutz: what kind of portability are you buying by assuming casting from double to int is undefined? Is there actually a relevant platform where this is the case? –  Eamon Nerbonne Jun 18 '10 at 13:34
    
@Chris Lutz If it's a standards compliant C implementation, then it obeys When a finite value of real floating type is converted to an integer type other than _Bool, the fractional part is discarded (i.e., the value is truncated toward zero). –  Pete Kirkham Jun 18 '10 at 17:44

Yes, using sprintf.

int num;
scanf("%d",&num);
char testing[100];
sprintf(testing,"%d",num);
int length = strlen(testing);

Alternatively, you can do this mathematically using the log10 function.

int num;
scanf("%d",&num);
int length;
if (num == 0) {
  length = 1;
} else {    
  length = log10(fabs(num)) + 1;
  if (num < 0) length++;
}
share|improve this answer
    
No, that's actually rather dangerous and prone to errors. You should use snprintf() so you don't have to write (and risk overflowing) anything. –  Chris Lutz Jun 18 '10 at 9:11
    
Assuming he was referring to a C integer (not a bignum type) there won't be any issues with overflows. –  Jamie Wong Jun 18 '10 at 9:15
1  
There will be issues when computers get bigger. Sure, you'll need a 512 bit computer to break your code, but they'll probably make one someday. –  Chris Lutz Jun 18 '10 at 9:17
    
no, likely 128 bit will be the last frontier... there won't be any reason to go beyond (exagerating, I say there's no reason for going beyond 64 bits, but I am almost already wrong, but currently no real 128bit processor are available yet, and they hardly will be, at least in consumer computing... I hope, since the they will need them, it would mean O.S. will be too fat and we'll remember these days as better days) –  ShinTakezou Jun 18 '10 at 9:54

The most efficient way could possibly be to use a fast logarithm based approach, similar to those used to determine the highest bit set in an integer.

size_t printed_length ( int32_t x )
{
    size_t count = x < 0 ? 2 : 1;

    if ( x < 0 ) x = -x;

    if ( x >= 100000000 ) {
        count += 8;
        x /= 100000000;
    }

    if ( x >= 10000 ) {
        count += 4;
        x /= 10000;
    }

    if ( x >= 100 ) {
        count += 2;
        x /= 100;
    }

    if ( x >= 10 )
        ++count;

    return count;
}

This (possibly premature) optimisation takes 0.65s for 20 million calls on my netbook; iterative division like zed_0xff has takes 1.6s, recursive division like Kangkan takes 1.8s, and using floating point functions (Jordan Lewis' code) takes a whopping 6.6s. Using snprintf takes 11.5s, but will give you the size that snprintf requires for any format, not just integers. Jordan reports that the ordering of the timings are not maintained on his processor, which does floating point faster than mine.

The easiest is probably to ask snprintf for the printed length:

#include <stdio.h>

size_t printed_length ( int x )
{
    return snprintf ( NULL, 0, "%d", x );
}

int main ()
{
    int x[] = { 1, 25, 12512, 0, -15 };

    for ( int i = 0; i < sizeof ( x ) / sizeof ( x[0] ); ++i )
        printf ( "%d -> %d\n", x[i], printed_length ( x[i] ) );

    return 0;
}
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1  
If you're going to use snprintf(), why not snprintf(NULL, 0, "%d", x) and not write anything? (At the very least, use a static buffer in your function.) –  Chris Lutz Jun 18 '10 at 9:20
    
because I haven't had enough coffee yet this morning, and was thinking about the first leg of the answer. –  Pete Kirkham Jun 18 '10 at 9:26
    
Should split your replies in two posts, I'd +1 the first one but not the 2nd. –  Blindy Jun 18 '10 at 9:30
2  
It rather depends why you want the length - if you want to know how many chars snprintf will require, you're better off using snprintf; if you want silly optimised code, you might want the first one. –  Pete Kirkham Jun 18 '10 at 9:49
1  
" C99 allows str to be NULL in this case [the case of n==0], and gives the return value (as always) as the number of characters that would have been written in case the output string has been large enough" so it is ok, why not –  ShinTakezou Jun 18 '10 at 10:00

The number of digits of an integer x is equal to 1 + log10(x). So you can do this:

#include <math.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    int x;
    scanf("%d", &x);
    printf("x has %d digits\n", 1 + (int)log10(x));
}

Or you can run a loop to count the digits yourself: do integer division by 10 until the number is 0:

int numDigits = 0;
do
{
    ++numDigits;
    x = x / 10;
} while ( x );

You have to be a bit careful to return 1 if the integer is 0 in the first solution and you might also want to treat negative integers (work with -x if x < 0).

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A correct snprintf implementation:

int count = snprintf(NULL, 0, "%i", x);
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Quite simple

int main() {
    int num = 123;
    char buf[50];

    // convert 123 to string [buf]
    itoa(num, buf, 10);

    // print our string
    printf("%s\n", strlen (buf));

    return 0;
}
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3  
itoa() isn't standard C. –  Chris Lutz Jun 18 '10 at 9:13
1  
Sure, Thx for the comment –  Mauro Jun 18 '10 at 9:22
    
it can be easily written however –  ShinTakezou Jun 18 '10 at 9:55
sprintf(s, "%d", n);
length_of_int = strlen(s);
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keep dividing by ten until you get zero, then just output the number of divisions.

int intLen(int x)
{
  if(!x) return 1;
  int i;
  for(i=0; x!=0; ++i)
  {
    x /= 10;
  }
  return i;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is incorrect. This will return an arbitrary number if x = 0. –  Jamie Wong Jun 18 '10 at 9:19
    
Bet it won't... It will however return the wrong value for 0. –  Blindy Jun 18 '10 at 9:26
    
@phleet, I'm pretty sure the semicolon after i=0 is a sequence point, but zero is still the wrong output. It's fixed now though. –  Graphics Noob Jun 18 '10 at 9:36

I think I got the most efficient way to find the length of an integer its a very simple and elegant way here it is:

int PEMath::LengthOfNum(int Num)
{
int count = 1;  //count starts at one because its the minumum amount of digits posible
if (Num < 0)
{
    Num *= (-1);
}

for(int i = 10; i <= Num; i*=10)
{
     count++;
}      
return count;
                // this loop will loop until the number "i" is bigger then "Num"
                // if "i" is less then "Num" multiply "i" by 10 and increase count
                // when the loop ends the number of count is the length of "Num".
}
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1  
Num *= (-1) seems a bit heavy handed, although your compiler will probably optimize it to the much more efficient Num = -Num. Note that multiplication is often an expensive operation whereas negating an integer is pretty trivial. –  Arunas Oct 9 '13 at 22:46

In my opinion the shortest and easiest solution would be:

int length , n;

printf("Enter a number: ");

scanf("%d", &n);

length = 0;

while (n > 0) {
   n = n / 10;
   length++;
}

printf("Length of the number: %d", length);
share|improve this answer
    
If (n) equals 0, this will return length of (n) as 0. Use do...while so loop is executed once when (n) equals 0. –  Kevin Fegan Jan 11 at 2:18

My way:

Divide as long as number is no more divisible by 10:

u8 NumberOfDigits(u32 number)
{
    u8 i = 1;
    while (number /= 10) i++;

    return i;
}

I don't know how fast is it in compared with other propositions..

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int intlen(int integer){
    int a;
    for(a = 1; integer /= 10; a++);
    return a;
}
share|improve this answer

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