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On several of my usercontrols, I change the cursor by using

this.Cursor = Cursors.Wait;

when I click on something.

Now I want to do the same thing on a WPF page on a button click. When I hover over my button, the cursor changes to a hand, but when I click it, it doesn't change to the wait cursor. I wonder if this has something to do with the fact that it's a button, or because this is a page and not a usercontrol? This seems like weird behavior.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 132 down vote accepted

Do you need the cursor to be a "wait" cursor only when it's over that particular page/usercontrol? If not, I'd suggest using Mouse.OverrideCursor:

Mouse.OverrideCursor = Cursors.Wait;
try
{
    // do stuff
}
finally
{
    Mouse.OverrideCursor = null;
}

This overrides the cursor for your application rather than just for a part of its UI, so the problem you're describing goes away.

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Similar to my own answer, dated 3 years later(almost exactly!). I like the answers in this question, but the simplest one is always the most tempting :) –  Robin Maben Jul 31 '12 at 13:58
    
This solution will change the cursor to be a "wait" cursor but it will not disable any further mouse inputs. I tried using this solution and although the mouse changed to the wait cursor I am still able to click any UI element within my WPF application without any problem. Any ideas how I can prevent the user from actually using the mouse during the wait cursor is active? –  Thomas Huber Dec 4 '12 at 14:46
    
Old as it is and accepted as it is, it's NOT the proper answer. Overriding the app cursor is different than overriding a control cursor (and the second has problems in WPF all right). Overriding the app cursor can have nasty side effects, for instance, a popping up (error) message box might be forced to use the same overridden cursor erroneously while the intention was only to override while the mouse is hovering over the actual and active control. –  Gábor Jun 6 '14 at 18:48

One way we do this in our application is using IDisposable and then with using(){} blocks to ensure the cursor is reset when done.

public class OverrideCursor : IDisposable
{

  public OverrideCursor(Cursor changeToCursor)
  {
    Mouse.OverrideCursor = changeToCursor;
  }

  #region IDisposable Members

  public void Dispose()
  {
    Mouse.OverrideCursor = null;
  }

  #endregion
}

and then in your code:

using (OverrideCursor cursor = new OverrideCursor(Cursors.Wait))
{
  // Do work...
}

The override will end when either: the end of the using statement is reached or; if an exception is thrown and control leaves the statement block before the end of the statement.

Update

To prevent the cursor flickering you can do:

public class OverrideCursor : IDisposable
{
  static Stack<Cursor> s_Stack = new Stack<Cursor>();

  public OverrideCursor(Cursor changeToCursor)
  {
    s_Stack.Push(changeToCursor);

    if (Mouse.OverrideCursor != changeToCursor)
      Mouse.OverrideCursor = changeToCursor;
  }

  public void Dispose()
  {
    s_Stack.Pop();

    Cursor cursor = s_Stack.Count > 0 ? s_Stack.Peek() : null;

    if (cursor != Mouse.OverrideCursor)
      Mouse.OverrideCursor = cursor;
  }

}
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1  
Nice touch with the stack. -john –  jschroedl Sep 8 '09 at 13:59
    
Thanks John. It is very useful when you start to nest the cursor changes when there are multiple entry points. Also note the checks to prevent the cursor from flickering. It equates to basically the same IL as the selected answer. –  Dennis Sep 10 '09 at 10:53
2  
Nice solution with the using part. I actually wrote exactly the same in some of our projects (without the stack, that is). One thing you can simplify in the usage is to just write: using (new OverrideCursor(Cursors.Wait)) { //do stuff } instead of assigning it a variable you probably will not use. –  Olli May 18 '10 at 14:25
    
i think you need a not null check, or am not sure what happens if you set null for cursor! lemme check! Cursor cursor = s_Stack.Count > 0 ? s_Stack.Peek() : null; if (cursor!=null) && (cursor != Mouse.OverrideCursor) Mouse.OverrideCursor = cursor; –  ioWint Aug 11 '11 at 1:12
1  
Not needed. If you set Mouse.OverrideCursor to null it is unset and no longer overrides the system cursor. IF I was modifying the current cursor directly (i.e. not overriding) then there could be a problem. –  Dennis Aug 11 '11 at 9:32

You can use a data trigger (with a view model) on the button to enable a wait cursor.

<Button x:Name="NextButton"
        Content="Go"
        Command="{Binding GoCommand }">
    <Button.Style>
         <Style TargetType="{x:Type Button}">
             <Setter Property="Cursor" Value="Arrow"/>
             <Style.Triggers>
                 <DataTrigger Binding="{Binding Path=IsWorking}" Value="True">
                     <Setter Property="Cursor" Value="Wait"/>
                 </DataTrigger>
             </Style.Triggers>
         </Style>
    </Button.Style>
</Button>

Here is the code from the view-model:

public class MainViewModel : ViewModelBase
{
   // most code removed for this example

   public MainViewModel()
   {
      GoCommand = new DelegateCommand<object>(OnGoCommand, CanGoCommand);
   }

   // flag used by data binding trigger
   private bool _isWorking = false;
   public bool IsWorking
   {
      get { return _isWorking; }
      set
      {
         _isWorking = value;
         OnPropertyChanged("IsWorking");
      }
   }

   // button click event gets processed here
   public ICommand GoCommand { get; private set; }
   private void OnGoCommand(object obj)
   {
      if ( _selectedCustomer != null )
      {
         // wait cursor ON
         IsWorking = true;
         _ds = OrdersManager.LoadToDataSet(_selectedCustomer.ID);
         OnPropertyChanged("GridData");

         // wait cursor off
         IsWorking = false;
      }
   }
}
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3  
Please add a comment for your down vote to help me understand why. I used this code several times with good results. –  Zamboni Jun 10 '10 at 21:08
    
Although i think it's not the simplest solution, i also do not understand the down vote –  Luis Filipe Jun 22 '10 at 17:03
3  
I don't get the downvote either. This answer is useful when you're using MVvM (so no code-behind) and want to control the cursor for a specific control. Very useful. –  Simon Gillbee Sep 10 '10 at 16:07
2  
I'm leveraging the benefits of MVVM and this is the perfect answer. –  g1ga Jul 10 '12 at 22:20

If your application uses async stuff and you're fiddling with Mouse's cursor, you probably want to do it only in main UI thread. You can use app's Dispatcher thread for that:

Application.Current.Dispatcher.Invoke(() =>
{
    // The check is required to prevent cursor flickering
    if (Mouse.OverrideCursor != cursor)
        Mouse.OverrideCursor = cursor;
});
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