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What is the shortest chunk of C++ you can come up with to safely clean up a vector or list of pointers? (assuming you have to call delete on the pointers?)

list<Foo*> foo_list;

I'd rather not use Boost or wrap my pointers with smart pointers.

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1  
It's really dangerous to rely on code outside of the container to delete your pointers. What happens when the container is destroyed due to a thrown exception, for example? I know you said you don't like boost, but please consider the boost pointer containers. –  Mark Ransom Nov 20 '08 at 23:14
    
i second you opinion –  Yogesh Arora Mar 22 '10 at 3:52
1  
Smart pointers (including Boost::shared_ptr) will delete your objects under circumstances where you'll have a great deal of difficult seeing that it's done manually. –  David Thornley Apr 19 '10 at 20:45
    
One of the pitfalls is that, perversely, the STL allows several important iterator operations to throw exceptions. This makes many "obvious" approaches using iteration through a container unsafe. See stackoverflow.com/questions/7902452/… –  Raedwald Oct 27 '11 at 12:21

13 Answers 13

up vote 39 down vote accepted

Since we are throwing down the gauntlet here... "Shortest chunk of C++"

static bool deleteAll( Foo * theElement ) { delete theElement; return true; }

foo_list . remove_if ( deleteAll );

I think we can trust the folks who came up with STL to have efficient algorithms. Why reinvent the wheel?

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I like it. I wrote a function template instead, but the remove_if idea is nice. –  twk Nov 24 '08 at 18:03
18  
achieves the purpose but seems very hacky... –  Yogesh Arora Mar 22 '10 at 3:51
21  
Is it just me or does it feel really wrong when a Predicate have side effects? –  Andre Rodrigues Dec 21 '11 at 17:02

For std::list<T*> use:

while(!foo.empty()) delete foo.front(), foo.pop_front();

For std::vector<T*> use:

while(!bar.empty()) delete bar.back(), bar.pop_back();

Not sure why i took front instead of back for std::list above. I guess it's the feeling that it's faster. But actually both are constant time :). Anyway wrap it into a function and have fun:

template<typename Container>
void delete_them(Container& c) { while(!c.empty()) delete c.back(), c.pop_back(); }
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2  
Technically correct, but it gets a lot longer if you use more common brace and indenting conventions. –  Mark Ransom Nov 20 '08 at 23:10
    
read it from left to right: While foo is not empty, delete the front of foo, and pop the front of foo :p newlines would only get into the way :/ –  Johannes Schaub - litb Nov 20 '08 at 23:26
4  
I'd recommend against using the comma (sequence) operator. Too many C++ devs have no idea what it does, and will mistake it for a semicolon. –  Kristopher Johnson Apr 19 '10 at 20:38
2  
@Johannes Schaub - is it necessary to call delete. Isn't calling pop_back() sufficient? When I read what pop_back does , I see that it also calls the removed elements destructor. - cplusplus.com/reference/stl/vector/pop_back. –  Eternal Learner Aug 8 '11 at 17:03
6  
@EternalLearner Calling the destructor doesn't de-allocate memory. You still need to call delete on the pointer so that the memory is de-allocated. –  a_m0d Oct 6 '11 at 19:56
for(list<Foo*>::const_iterator it = foo_list.begin(); it != foo_list.end(); it++)
{
    delete *it;
} 
foo_list.clear();
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Upvoted because it performs well and is short. I added a modified version of your answer that is quite a bit shorter (but relies on C++11). –  Adisak Feb 12 at 22:06

It's really dangerous to rely on code outside of the container to delete your pointers. What happens when the container is destroyed due to a thrown exception, for example?

I know you said you don't like boost, but please consider the boost pointer containers.

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i second you opinion –  Yogesh Arora Mar 22 '10 at 3:52
    
One of the pitfalls is that, perversely, the STL allows several important iterator operations to throw exceptions. This makes many "obvious" approaches using iteration through a container unsafe. See stackoverflow.com/questions/7902452/… –  Raedwald Oct 27 '11 at 12:21
    
@YogeshArora Me too, but this doesn't make this a valid answer in any way. –  Christian Rau Dec 5 '13 at 16:20
template< typename T >
struct delete_ptr : public std::unary_function<bool,T>
{
   bool operator()(T*pT) const { delete pT; return true; }
};

std::for_each( foo_list.begin(), foo_list.end(), delete_ptr<Foo>() );
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I'm not sure that the functor approach wins for brevity here.

for( list<Foo*>::iterator i = foo_list.begin(); i != foo_list.end(); ++i )
    delete *i;

I'd usually advise against this, though. Wrapping the pointers in smart pointers or using a specialist pointer container is, in general, going to be more robust. There are lots of ways that items can be removed from a list ( various flavours of erase, clear, destruction of the list, assignment via an iterator into the list, etc. ). Can you guarantee to catch them all?

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The functor approach may not win for brevity, but that's not much of a prize. By using a functor you avoid having to write your own for loop, which is a source of many defects in software. –  John Dibling Nov 21 '08 at 15:26
    
The question specifically asked about "shortest". I had no idea that manual for loops were a major source of defects, can you provide a reference? If a member of my team had a problem writing a bug free for loop, I'd rather not let him loose on a functor solution. –  Charles Bailey Nov 23 '08 at 11:55
    
The request was to "safely clean up" the container. But the safety of that code relies on several methods not throwing exceptions: begin(), end(), iterator::operator!=, iterator::operator*, iterator::operator++. Surpirsingly, such reliance is unsafe: stackoverflow.com/questions/7902452/… –  Raedwald Oct 27 '11 at 12:25

The following hack deletes the pointers when your list goes out of scope using RAII or if you call list::clear().

template <typename T>
class Deleter {
public:
  Deleter(T* pointer) : pointer_(pointer) { }
  Deleter(const Deleter& deleter) {
    Deleter* d = const_cast<Deleter*>(&deleter);
    pointer_ = d->pointer_;
    d->pointer_ = 0;
  }
  ~Deleter() { delete pointer_; }
  T* pointer_;
};

Example:

std::list<Deleter<Foo> > foo_list;
foo_list.push_back(new Foo());
foo_list.clear();
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I like that! It kind of works like the shared_ptr but for the container only and it is so minimal and elegant. I was looking at the boost smart pointers the other day and it is over 200K - incomprehensible - source code! –  Dimitris Aug 7 '12 at 11:58
    
That's really neat! If you overload the pointer dereference (*) and member selection (->) operator too you can make it entirely transparent I would have thought. –  lytnus Apr 15 '13 at 23:55

At least for a list, iterating and deleting, then calling clear at the end is a bit inneficient since it involves traversing the list twice, when you really only have to do it once. Here is a little better way:

for (list<Foo*>::iterator i = foo_list.begin(), e = foo_list.end(); i != e; )
{
    list<Foo*>::iterator tmp(i++);
    delete *tmp;
    foo_list.erase(tmp);
}

That said, your compiler may be smart enough to loop combine the two anyways, depending on how list::clear is implemented.

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+1 because of the stability workaround. I think a big problem of the c++ is that this code more complex already as a such list manipulation in the plain old C. –  Peter Horvath Feb 26 at 10:49

Actually, I believe the STD library provides a direct method of managing memory in the form of the allocator class

You can extend the basic allocator's deallocate() method to automatically delete the members of any container.

I /think/ this is the type of thing it's intended for.

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void remove(Foo* foo) { delete foo; }
....
for_each( foo_list.begin(), foo_list.end(), remove );
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You know that delete foo already checks if foo is nullptr, do you? –  Christian Rau Dec 5 '13 at 16:22
    
@ChristianRau I do now. Thank You –  kendotwill Dec 5 '13 at 17:21

If you allow C++11, you can do a very short version of Douglas Leeder's answer:

for(auto &it:foo_list) delete it; foo_list.clear();
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for(list<Foo*>::const_iterator it = foo_list.begin(); it != foo_list.end(); it++)
{
    delete *it;
} 
foo_list.clear();

There's a small reason why you would not want to do this - you're effectively iterating over the list twice.

std::list<>::clear is linear in complexity; it removes and destroys one element at a time within a loop.

Taking the above into consideration the simplest to read solution in my opinion is:

while(!foo_list.empty())
{
    delete foo_list.front();
    foo_list.pop_front();
}
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for (list<Foo*>::const_iterator i = foo_list.begin(), e = foo_list.end(); i != e; ++i)
    delete *i;
foo_list.clear();
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