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Is this defined by the language? Is there a defined maximum? Is it different in different browsers?

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16 Answers 16

up vote 347 down vote accepted

+/- 9007199254740992

ECMA Section 8.5 - Numbers

Note that all the positive and negative integers whose magnitude is no greater than 253 are representable in the Number type (indeed, the integer 0 has two representations, +0 and −0).

They are 64-bit floating point values, the largest exact integral value is 253, or 9007199254740992.

Note that the bitwise operators and shift operators operate on 32-bit ints.


Test it out!

var x = 9007199254740992;
var y = -x;
x == x + 1; // true !
y == y - 1; // also true !
// Arithmetic operators work, but bitwise/shifts only operate on int32:
x / 2;      // 4503599627370496
x >> 1;     // 0
x | 1;      // 1
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42  
This seems right, but is there someplace where this is defined, á la C's MAX_INT or Java's Integer.MAX_VALUE? –  TALlama Nov 20 '08 at 23:35
4  
according to IEEE_754 standard, 64-bit floating point uses 53 bits for the mantissa. As far as a javascript constant, I'm not aware of any. –  Jimmy Nov 21 '08 at 18:14
20  
4294967295 === Math.pow(2,32) - 1; –  CoolAJ86 Aug 23 '11 at 20:15
8  
So what's the smallest and largest integer we can use to assure exact precision? –  Pacerier Oct 15 '11 at 16:21
21  
Maybe worth noting that there is no actual (int) in javascript. Every instance of Number is (float) or NaN. –  Beetroot-Beetroot Aug 31 '12 at 13:09

From the reference:

alert([Number.MAX_VALUE, Number.MIN_VALUE]);
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14  
I've edited the question to be a bit more precise about wanting the max Integer values, not just the max Number value. Sorry for the confusion, here. –  TALlama Nov 20 '08 at 23:21
4  
Is the returned result guaranteed to be equal on all browsers? –  Pacerier Sep 21 '13 at 19:05
1  
Note that Number.MIN_VALUE is the smallest possible positive number. The least value (i.e. less than anything else) is probably -Number.MAX_VALUE. –  Michael Scheper Jun 10 at 23:19
    
This is the maximum floating point value. The question is about the highest integer value. And while Number.MAX_VALUE is an integer, you can't go past 2^53 without losing precision. –  Teepeemm Jul 22 at 22:01
7  
ES6 introduces Number.MIN_SAFE_INTEGER and Number.MAX_SAFE_INTEGER –  superlukas Aug 31 at 15:23

It is 253 == 9 007 199 254 740 992. This is because Numbers are stored as floating-point in a 52-bit mantissa.

The min value is -253.

This makes some fun things happening

Math.pow(2, 53) == Math.pow(2, 53) + 1
>> true

And can also be dangerous :)

var MAX_INT = Math.pow(2, 53); // 9 007 199 254 740 992
for (var i = MAX_INT; i < MAX_INT + 2; ++i) {
    // infinite loop
}

Further reading: http://blog.vjeux.com/2010/javascript/javascript-max_int-number-limits.html

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Good warnings.. –  Pacerier Oct 15 '13 at 10:05
    
Nice reference, thanks. –  David Cuccia Jan 5 at 23:46

In javascript, there is a number called Infinity

examples:

(Infinity>100)
=> true

//also worth noting
Infinity - 1 == Infinity
=> true

Math.pow(2,1024) === Infinity
=> true

This may be sufficient for some questions regarding this topic.

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3  
Something tells me infinity doesn't qualify as an integer. :) –  chaiguy Sep 19 '12 at 22:20
6  
But it's good enough to initialize a min variable when you're looking for a minimum value. –  djjeck Oct 23 '12 at 21:30
4  
Note that Infinity - 1 === Infinity –  H.Wolper Oct 18 '13 at 9:22
2  
also (Infinity<100) => false and Math.pow(2,1024) === Infinity –  Sijav Oct 30 '13 at 12:12
1  
Also worth nothing that it does handle negative Infinity too. So 1 - Infinity === -Infinity –  dmccabe Nov 5 at 21:51

Jimmy's answer correctly represents the continuous JavaScript integer spectrum as -9007199254740992 to 9007199254740992 inclusive (sorry 9007199254740993, you might think you are 9007199254740993, but you are wrong!).

However, there is no answer that finds/proves this programatically (other than the one CoolAJ86 alluded to in his answer that would finish in 28.56 years ;), so here's a slightly more efficient way to do that (to be precise, it's more efficient by about 28.559999999968312 years :), along with a test fiddle:

/**
 * Checks if adding/subtracting one to/from a number yields the correct result.
 *
 * @param number The number to test
 * @return true if you can add/subtract 1, false otherwise.
 */
var canAddSubtractOneFromNumber = function(number){
    var numMinusOne = number - 1;
    var numPlusOne = number + 1;

    return ((number - numMinusOne) == 1) && ((number - numPlusOne) == -1);
}

//Find the highest number
var highestNumber = 3;//Start with an integer 1 or higher

//Get a number higher than the valid integer range
while(canAddSubtractOneFromNumber(highestNumber)){
    highestNumber *= 2;
}

//Find the lowest number you can't add/subtract 1 from
var numToSubtract = highestNumber / 4;
while(numToSubtract >= 1){
    while(!canAddSubtractOneFromNumber(highestNumber - numToSubtract)){
        highestNumber = highestNumber - numToSubtract;
    }

    numToSubtract /= 2;
}        

//And there was much rejoicing.  Yay.    
console.log('HighestNumber = ' + highestNumber);
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1  
Way to 1-up me man! Haha! :-D –  CoolAJ86 Feb 12 '13 at 18:44
3  
@CoolAJ86: Lol, I'm looking forward to March 15, 2040. If our numbers match we should throw a party :) –  Briguy37 Feb 12 '13 at 22:15
    
var x=Math.pow(2,53)-3;while (x!=x+1) x++; -> 9007199254740991 –  MickLH Nov 17 '13 at 23:18
    
@MickLH: I get 9007199254740992 with that code. What JavaScript engine are you using to test? –  Briguy37 Nov 18 '13 at 15:52
    
You get 9007199254740992 with your own code, I did not use the final value of x, but the final evaulation of x++ for paranoid reasons. Google Chrome btw. –  MickLH Nov 18 '13 at 18:00

To be safe

var MAX_INT = 4294967295;

Reasoning

I thought I'd be clever and find the value at which x + 1 === x with a more pragmatic approach.

My machine can only count 10 million per second or so... so I'll post back with the definitive answer in 28.56 years.

If you can't wait that long, I'm willing to bet that

  • Most of your loops don't run for 28.56 years
  • 9007199254740992 === Math.pow(2, 53) + 1 is proof enough
  • You should stick to 4294967295 which is Math.pow(2,32) - 1 as to avoid expected issues with bit-shifting

Finding x + 1 === x:

(function () {
  "use strict";

  var x = 0
    , start = new Date().valueOf()
    ;

  while (x + 1 != x) {
    if (!(x % 10000000)) {
      console.log(x);
    }

    x += 1
  }

  console.log(x, new Date().valueOf() - start);
}());
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Why not follow the standard at stackoverflow.com/a/307200/632951 ? –  Pacerier Sep 21 '13 at 19:09
    
cant you just start it at 2^53 - 2 to test? (yes you can, I just tried it, even with -3 to be safe: var x=Math.pow(2,53)-3;while (x!=x+1) x++;) -> 9007199254740991 –  MickLH Nov 17 '13 at 23:14
    
Nice answer! Moreover, I know the value is settled, but why not use binary search for its finding? –  higuaro Mar 3 at 18:22
    
What's the fun in that? Besides, @Briguy37 beat me to it: stackoverflow.com/a/11639621/151312 –  CoolAJ86 Mar 4 at 19:04
    
note that this 'safe' MAX_INT based on 32 bits will not work when comparing with Date values. 4294967295 is so yesterday! –  Jerry May 20 at 22:08

The short answer is “it depends.”

If you’re using bitwise operators anywhere (or if you’re referring to the length of an Array), the ranges are:

Unsigned: 0…(-1>>>0)

Signed: (-(-1>>>1)-1)…(-1>>>1)

(It so happens that the bitwise operators and the maximum length of an array are restricted to 32-bit integers.)

If you’re not using bitwise operators or working with array lengths:

Signed: (-Math.pow(2,53))…(+Math.pow(2,53))

These limitations are imposed by the internal representation of the “Number” type, which generally corresponds to IEEE 754 double-precision floating-point representation. (Note that unlike typical signed integers, the magnitude of the negative limit is the same as the magnitude of the positive limit, due to characteristics of the internal representation, which actually includes a negative 0!)

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5  
Whoever downvoted, do you care to comment? –  danorton Jul 17 '11 at 14:24
    
This is the answer I wanted to stumble upon on how to convert X to a 32 bit integer or unsigned integer. Upvoted your answer for that. –  Charlie Affumigato Nov 24 '13 at 2:51

ECMAScript 6:

Number.MAX_SAFE_INTEGER = Math.pow(2, 53)-1;
Number.MIN_SAFE_INTEGER = -Number.MAX_SAFE_INTEGER;
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anything you want to use for bitwise operations must be between 0x80000000 (-2147483648 or -2^31) and 0x7fffffff (2147483647 or 2^31 - 1).

the console will tell you that 0x80000000 equals +2147483648, but 0x80000000 & 0x80000000 equals -2147483648

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Other may have already given the generic answer, but I thought it would be a good idea to give a fast way of determining it :

for (var x = 2; x + 1 !== x; x *= 2);
console.log(x);

Which gives me 9007199254740992 within less than a millisecond in Chrome 30.

It will test powers of 2 to find which one, when 'added' 1, equals himself.

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I did a simple test with a formula X-(X+1)=-1 and the largest value of X I can get to work on Safari, Opera and Firefox (tested on OSX) is 9e15. Here is the code I used for testing:

javascript: alert(9e15-(9e15+1));
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Note that 9e15 = 2^53 (see @Jimmy's answer). –  Wedge Nov 21 '08 at 0:39
4  
9e15 = 9000000000000000. 2^53 = 9007199254740992. Therefore to be pedantic, 9e15 is only approximately equal to 2^53 (with two significant digits). –  chaiguy Sep 19 '12 at 22:24
    
@chaiguy In 9000000000000000 there is 1 significant figure. in ` 9007199254740992` there are 15 significant figures. –  Royi Namir Nov 13 '13 at 6:36
    
@RoyiNamir Not wanting to start a pointless argument here, but 9000000000000000 has 16 significant digits. If you want only 1, it would have to be written as 9x10^15. –  chaiguy Nov 13 '13 at 18:01
    
@chaiguy No. 9000000000000000 as it is - has 1 SF. where 90*10^14 has 2. (sigfigscalculator.appspot.com) & mathsfirst.massey.ac.nz/Algebra/Decimals/SigFig.htm (bottom section) –  Royi Namir Nov 13 '13 at 18:17

In the Google Chrome built-in javascript, you can go to approximately 2^1024 before the number is called infinity.

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4  
that's the max floating point, not max int –  Lưu Vĩnh Phúc Aug 4 '13 at 10:29
    
Downvoted: 2^1024 is 1026. –  danorton Nov 8 '13 at 18:24
7  
That's because ^ in Javascript means XOR, not power. Maybe a good idea to solve your own ignorance before you downvote people. –  Travis Webb Dec 1 '13 at 21:07
1  
@TravisWebb, be nice. –  danorton Oct 18 at 21:43

I write it like this:

var max_int = 0x20000000000000;
var min_int = -0x20000000000000;
(max_int + 1) === 0x20000000000000;  //true
(max_int - 1) < 0x20000000000000;    //true

Same for int32

var max_int32 =  0x80000000;
var min_int32 = -0x80000000;
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maxInt = -1 >>> 1

in Firefox 3.6 it's 2^31 - 1.

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9  
Bitwise operations are working on 32 bits on Javascript. –  Vjeux May 4 '11 at 14:37
1  
@danorton: I'm not sure you understand what you are doing. ^means raised to the power. In the javascript console, ^ is XOR, not raised-to –  Kumar Harsh Dec 24 '13 at 11:09
1  
open Chrome/Firefox console. Type 5^2. In binary, 5 is 101 and 2 is 010. Now, if you Bitwise XOR them, you'll get 5(101) ^ 2(010) = 7(111) READ THIS IF YOU'RE CONFUSED What is being discussed here is Math.pow() not the ^ operator –  Kumar Harsh Dec 25 '13 at 15:22
2  
Again, I am not at all confused. I have commented and downvoted on what is written. If Math.pow() is what is meant, then that is what should be written. In an answer to a question about JavaScript, it is inappropriate to use syntax of a different language. It is even more inappropriate to use a syntax that is valid in JavaScript, but with an interpretation in JavaScript that has a different meaning than what is intended. –  danorton Dec 31 '13 at 18:56
4  
2^31 is how one writes two to the thirty-first power in English. It's not in a code block. Would you complain about someone using a ; in an answer, because that's a character with a different meaning in Javascript? –  lmm Mar 5 at 13:55

UPDATE: Node.js and google Chrome seem to both be using 1024 bit floating point values so:

Number.MAX_VALUE = 1.7976931348623157e+308

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1  
-1: the maximum representable (non-exact integral) number may be ~2^1024, but that doesn't mean they're deviating from the IEEE-754 64-bit standard. –  Roy Tinker Apr 3 '13 at 21:44
    
MAX_INT? Do you mean MAX_VALUE? –  Raul Guiu May 29 '13 at 9:54
    
Thanks Avempace..corrected. –  TinyTimZamboni May 29 '13 at 17:42
2  
that's maximum of a floating point value. It doesn't mean that you can store an int that long –  Lưu Vĩnh Phúc Aug 4 '13 at 10:30
    
Or more to the point, you can't reliably store an int that long without loss of accuracy. 2^53 is referred to as MAX_SAFE_INT because above that point the values become approximations, in the same way fractions are. –  IMSoP Jun 16 at 18:32

Firefox 3 doesnt seem to have a problem with huge numbers.

1e+200 * 1e+100 will calculate fine to 1e+300.

Safari seem to have no problem with it aswell. (For the record, this is on a Mac if anyone else decides to test this)

Unless I lost my brain at this time of day, this is way bigger than a 64-bit integer.

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13  
its not a 64 bit integer, its a 64-bit floating point number, of which 52/53 bits are the integer portion. so it will handle up to 1e300, but not with exact precision. –  Jimmy Nov 21 '08 at 18:11
1  
Jimmy is correct. Try this in your browser or JS command line: 100000000000000010 - 1 => 100000000000000020 –  Ryan Oct 7 '11 at 21:54

protected by antyrat Sep 26 at 16:33

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