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I want to be able to call the following method after a specified delay. In objective c there was something like:

[self performSelector:@selector(DoSomething) withObject:nil afterDelay:5];

Is there an equivalent of this method in android with java? For example I need to be able to call a method after 5 seconds.

public void DoSomething()
{
     //do something here
}
share|improve this question

12 Answers 12

up vote 140 down vote accepted

It looks like the Mac OS API lets the current thread continue, and schedules the task to run asynchronously. In the Java, the equivalent function is provided by the java.util.concurrent package. I'm not sure what limitations Android might impose.

private static final ScheduledExecutorService worker = 
  Executors.newSingleThreadScheduledExecutor();

void someMethod() {
  ⋮
  Runnable task = new Runnable() {
    public void run() {
      /* Do something… */
    }
  };
  worker.schedule(task, 5, TimeUnit.SECONDS);
  ⋮
}
share|improve this answer
3  
This never calls the Runnable for me – Supuhstar Mar 17 '14 at 18:25
12  
As a side note: This also allows you to cancel the task later, which might be helpful in some situations. Simply store a reference to the ScheduledFuture<?> returned by worker.schedule() and call its cancel(boolean) method. – Dennis May 27 '14 at 12:14
    
I think this answer is outdated. .schedule doesn't seem to be a method of Runnable any longer...? :/ – beetree Jan 2 '15 at 0:20
5  
@beetree it's a method on ScheduledExecutorService. – erickson Jan 2 '15 at 1:01

Better version:

final Handler handler = new Handler();
handler.postDelayed(new Runnable() {
  @Override
  public void run() {
    //Do something after 100ms
  }
}, 100);
share|improve this answer
    
This worked perfectly and fit right into the method that I needed to do the call from. Thanks. – JT. Mar 28 '12 at 20:10
32  
This solution is usefull only on UI thread. Otherwise on normal thread, you need to implement looper which is not the best version I think – olivier_sdg Jan 10 '13 at 14:59
1  
@olivier_sdg why do you need to implement looper? – djechlin Mar 13 '13 at 16:37
11  
@djechlin A Handler must always be linked to a Looper, which will actually process the Runnable you post(). The UI thread already comes with a Looper, so you can just make a new Handler() on the UI thread and post() Runnables directly to it. These Runnables execute on the UI thread. To have Runnables execute on another thread, you need to make a new thread, then Looper.prepare(), make a new Handler() and then Looper.loop(). Any Runnables posted to this new Handler will execute on this new thread. If you don't do all this, the post() will throw an exception. – Dororo Mar 25 '13 at 21:48
4  
In case you need to, you can also cancel the execution as long as the Runnable is still in the message queue by calling removeCallbacks(Runnable r) on the Handler. – Dennis May 27 '14 at 12:24

I couldn't use any of the other answers in my case. I used the native java Timer instead.

new Timer().schedule(new TimerTask() {          
    @Override
    public void run() {
        // this code will be executed after 2 seconds       
    }
}, 2000);
share|improve this answer
21  
this is better than the ones that use Handler, because it doesn't have Looper issues when the Handler is not run on the UI thread. – Ben H Jun 27 '13 at 19:26
2  
When Android programming, I've seen articles that recommend using the Handler approach – the hulkster May 1 '14 at 19:51
8  
You should keep a reference to your timer in order to cancel it when it's not needed anymore since according to the Android doc: "When a timer is no longer needed, users should call cancel(), which releases the timer's thread and other resources. Timers not explicitly cancelled may hold resources indefinitely." – Pooks Jul 29 '14 at 8:46
    
yes yes yes .... like this answer – bebosh Sep 14 '14 at 13:37
1  
@vovahost that's only because you are updating UI components inside the timer block – Tim Castelijns Oct 28 '15 at 11:58

Thanks for all the great answers, I found a solution that best suits my needs.

Handler myHandler = new DoSomething();
Message m = new Message();
m.obj = c;//passing a parameter here
myHandler.sendMessageDelayed(m, 1000);

class DoSomething extends Handler {
    @Override
    public void handleMessage(Message msg) {
      MyObject o = (MyObject) msg.obj;
      //do something here
    }
}
share|improve this answer

you can use Handler inside UIThread:

runOnUiThread(new Runnable() {

    @Override
    public void run() {
         final Handler handler = new Handler();
         handler.postDelayed(new Runnable() {
           @Override
           public void run() {
               //add your code here
           }
         }, 1000);

    }
});
share|improve this answer

For executing something in the UI Thread after 5 seconds:

new Handler(Looper.getMainLooper()).postDelayed(new Runnable() {
    @Override
    public void run() {
        //Do something here
    }
}, 5000);
share|improve this answer
2  
Confirm, this is the best solution to prevent the call to looper.prepare and to place the whole thing into the UI thread. – Tobliug Mar 18 '15 at 2:28
    
Great! easy to use thank you – fullMoon Oct 3 '15 at 22:33

If you have to use the Handler, but you are into another thread, you can use runonuithread to run the handler in UI thread. This will save you from Exceptions thrown asking to call Looper.Prepare()

runOnUiThread(new Runnable() {
    @Override
    public void run() {
        new Handler().postDelayed(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                //Do something after 1 second
            }
        }, 1000);
    }
});

Looks quite messy, but this is one of the way.

share|improve this answer
2  
This works, I can't edit your post because of stupid SO rules with minimum 6 characters to edit, but there is '()' missing after 'new Handler' it should be 'new Handler()' – Jonathan Muller Feb 9 '15 at 16:17
    
@Koren thanks for pointing out the error. I've fixed it. – noob Feb 9 '15 at 18:48
    
Instead of placing everything into the UI thread, you can do : new Handler(Looper.getMainLooper()) – Tobliug Mar 18 '15 at 2:30

See this demo:

import java.util.Timer;
import java.util.TimerTask;

class Test {
     public static void main( String [] args ) {
          int delay = 5000;// in ms 

          Timer timer = new Timer();

          timer.schedule( new TimerTask(){
             public void run() { 
                 System.out.println("Wait, what..:");
              }
           }, delay);

           System.out.println("Would it run?");
     }
}
share|improve this answer

I perfer to use View.postDelayed() method, simple code below:

mView.postDelayed(new Runnable() {
    @Override
    public void run() {
        // Do something after 1000 ms
    }
}, 1000);
share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't it freeze the ui element itself, because it will be scheduled on the views handler? – JacksOnF1re Oct 19 '15 at 20:12
final Handler handler = new Handler(); 
Timer t = new Timer(); 
t.schedule(new TimerTask() { 
    public void run() { 
        handler.post(new Runnable() { 
            public void run() { 
                //DO SOME ACTIONS HERE , THIS ACTIONS WILL WILL EXECUTE AFTER 5 SECONDS...
            }
        }); 
    } 
}, 5000); 
share|improve this answer

I suggest the Timer, it allows you to schedule a method to be called on a very specific interval. This will not block your UI, and keep your app resonsive while the method is being executed.

The other option, is the wait(); method, this will block the current thread for the specified length of time. This will cause your UI to stop responding if you do this on the UI thread.

share|improve this answer
1  
Thread.sleep() is better than Object.wait(). Wait implies you expect to be notified and are synchronizing around some activity. Sleep indicates that you simply wish to do nothing for some specified time. Timer is the way to go if you want the action to happen asynchronously at some later point in time. – Tim Bender Jun 18 '10 at 18:51
    
That is true. Thats why I listed it as another option ;-) – Nate Jun 18 '10 at 19:02

A suitable solution in android:

private static long SLEEP_TIME = 2 // for 2 second
.
.
MyLauncher launcher = new MyLauncher();
            launcher.start();
.
.
private class MyLauncher extends Thread {
        @Override
        /**
         * Sleep for 2 seconds as you can also change SLEEP_TIME 2 to any. 
         */
        public void run() {
            try {
                // Sleeping
                Thread.sleep(SLEEP_TIME * 1000);
            } catch (Exception e) {
                Log.e(TAG, e.getMessage());
            }
            //do something you want to do
           //And your code will be executed after 2 second
        }
    }
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protected by Luksprog Mar 18 '13 at 8:46

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